Promised Land, Crusader State: The American Encounter with the World Since 1776

In an entertaining and iconoclastic fashion Philadelphia Inquirer , the celebrated historian reinterprets the traditions that have shaped U.S foreign policy from 1776 to the present McDougall has written a lively and provocative book Wall Street Journal that is a rich study of the American experience Los Angeles Times.
Promised Land Crusader State The American Encounter with the World Since In an entertaining and iconoclastic fashion Philadelphia Inquirer the celebrated historian reinterprets the traditions that have shaped U S foreign policy from to the present McDougall has writ

  • Title: Promised Land, Crusader State: The American Encounter with the World Since 1776
  • Author: Walter A. McDougall Walter A. McDonald
  • ISBN: 9780395901328
  • Page: 147
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Promised Land, Crusader State: The American Encounter with the World Since 1776”

    1. Even if you don't agree with all of his arguments, this well-written book offers astute observations of American foreign policy

    2. Excellent review of American foreign policy, but it seems he might have left out the fact that, at least since WWII, America has trained our partner nations' militaries.

    3. This is better than his follow-up/rewrite, "The Tragedy of US Foreign Policy," if only because this book doesn't engage in pro-Nixon conspiracy theories, unlike that one.It's very good. But, it's not fantastic. And, had I read it years ago, I might have three-starred it to offset some of the five-star reviews. On second thought, I'm going to do that anyway, but not just for that reason.First, I'm not sure if the Old Testament/New Testament split plays as concisely as McDougall claims. I mean, th [...]

    4. Interesting look at American History, with some interesting views on the "isms" of American Foreign Policy. Had to give it one star for whereas the "old" and "new" testament sections of the books provide reasonable support for the arguments presented the last chapter offers little support, presents shortsighted arguments, draws false historical analogies, ignores system level changes, and fails to consider restraints on the achievement of outcomes. (oh, yeah and Canadian Providences are never go [...]

    5. Wow! Written in 1997, this book predates all the debates about the loss of liberty at home, yet predicts just such events while examining the past traditions of American Foreign Policy. I would enjoy an updated version from Mr. McDougall. His historical analysis does leave some questions but is very convincing overall (to me). I strongly recommend this to anyone looking for answers / options to what the US should / could do in the arena of foreign policy.

    6. While the man had very good points to make there were a few that I think were a little out of date (the book was written in 1997). I don't believe his views apply as fully today as they might have back then. However, it was extremely informative and educational, but a little bit of a 'should' read as opposed to a reading for enjoyment. Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed it, but it's one of those learning books you really read to learn more than anything else. :)

    7. An eminently readable, deliberately provocative and yet thought provoking re-interpretation of many of the classic themes in the US history of foreign policy. A valuable contribution to any serious "re-assessment" of the US' role in international affairs and valuable addition to the seminal debates of the late 1990s.

    8. This book does a very good job over viewing the various strands of American foreign policy over the last 200+ years. Some very interesting facts as well. His thesis is laid out fairly well even if one disagrees in part or whole.

    9. This is an excellent survey of the diplomatic history of the United States. It goes off the rails in the last two chapters. McDougall's reading of Vietnam is way off, and his recommendations in the final chapter are mostly just nuts. But the rest is pure gold.

    10. Introduces 8 paradigms (principles), which explain all major thrusts of American history. Challenges your perception of US history.His "biblical" organizing principle is um, annoying? brilliant? Worth a read.

    11. The best concise history of United States foreign policy I have come across. This book shaped my outlook on our foreign affairs. I look forward to re-reading this.

    12. My very brief, perhaps somewhat colored review: interesting in some places (especially the discussions of Wilson and Vietnam), tendentious in others.

    13. Best (concise) history/understanding of American foreign policy and the schemata through which Americans interpret said policy.Awesome book

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