Sunstroke and Other Stories

A Picador Paperback OriginalTessa Hadley s stories trace the currents of desire, desperation, and mischief that that lie hidden inside domestic relationships.A mother hears her son s confession that he s cheating on his girlfriend a student falls in love with a professor and initiates an affair with a man who looks just like him A boy on a seaside vacation realizes thatA Picador Paperback OriginalTessa Hadley s stories trace the currents of desire, desperation, and mischief that that lie hidden inside domestic relationships.A mother hears her son s confession that he s cheating on his girlfriend a student falls in love with a professor and initiates an affair with a man who looks just like him A boy on a seaside vacation realizes that a grown up woman is pressing dangerously close.In Tessa Hadley s Sunstroke and Other Stories, everyone conspires to hold the loving and stable surface of family life together, as old secrets and new appetites threaten to blow it apart.
Sunstroke and Other Stories A Picador Paperback OriginalTessa Hadley s stories trace the currents of desire desperation and mischief that that lie hidden inside domestic relationships A mother hears her son s confession that h

  • Title: Sunstroke and Other Stories
  • Author: Tessa Hadley
  • ISBN: 9780312425999
  • Page: 294
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Sunstroke and Other Stories”

    1. i picked this up after enjoying a story of hers ("married love") in the new yorker, but after reading this and finding an earlier version of the same "new" story already published, i've come to believe she has nothing to say and rewrites this nothing often. wow, that sounds harsh. i just meant to say this book was a disappointment.

    2. This is an extraordinarily accomplished collection of stories with no weak or even mediocre links and two or three classic tales--and I say this as someone who typically is less interested in short story collections. I tend to clumsily divide writers into those who plot or think well and those who write well--naturally better writers do both. Hadley is obviously one of these. Each story is supremely well-conceived; the prose is classic. For me, reading her stories felt like one of those instance [...]

    3. I'm in the middle of this one right now and I have to take a break in between each story because they all pack such a wallup. Wow. Hadley might be my new favorite author. Highly recommended!

    4. J'ai découvert cet auteure galloise par hasard sur (vous savez quand vous regardez un livre et il vous dit "les acheteurs de ce livre ont également regardé ces livres") et quelle bonne surprise ! Une qualité au niveau du style et du détail, et de la manière dont Hadley réussit à reproduire l'esprit humain, les tracas, nos interrogations et surtout de ne jamais aller là où on l'attend.Une analyse très fine de l'esprit.

    5. As with most short story collections, the first ones are best. As the book winds on the stories start to get a little ragged around the edges, and Hadley's "agenda" (that sort of specifically British class self-consciousness socialist/'60s/feminist aesthetic) shows through unattractively. However, I found the title story, which ran in the New Yorker a few years back, almost unbearably touching and heartbreaking.

    6. This was a good collection. Problem is that I'm reading Hadley like stuffing handfuls of popcorn in my mouthI'm sort of obsessed and need to give it a rest for a while.

    7. Still think Hadley is the best writer out there. From the title short story, where adultery is envisioned, to the final story when mother and daughter remember the past differently, she takes the reader in just a few pages into feelings so familiar.Her descriptions are wonderful: "It's a summer day with the same blue sky and unserious puffs of creamy clouds as on the postcards.There are a lot of people holidaying . pink shorts and sunglasses, with troops of children, they buy locally made ice cr [...]

    8. I previously read The Past and gave it 4 stars. Towards the end of the year I downgraded it to 3 stars against other things I'd read because the story seemed too inconsequential despite the quality of the writing. Her short stories though are brilliant. Small snapshots of lives but everything about them rings so true. Her description of a young woman's fantasies are just so real - and the review of them from middle age is poignant and clear eyed. It's a little book and even if you don't generall [...]

    9. 3.7. I'm seeking out all her books. Almost as good as Married Love and Bad Dreams. Mostly great. Couldn't pinpoint what I didn't like quite as much Just a few stories felt a little bit blah, not as strong, but mostly really food.

    10. Beautiful.Every story was exactly perfect, and that last one? I don’t know what to say. It just plain killed me.

    11. I really enjoyed this collection of short stories by the British writer Tessa Hadley. The stories take place in England and Wales. Hadley's writes about different women coping with changes in their lives. The writing is superb. For example, Hadley writes of 2 characters "They are both in their early thirties, at that piquant moment of change when the outward accidents of flesh are beginning to be sharpened from inside by character and experience." And "There is no tedium like the tedium of twent [...]

    12. I can’t remember what I read about Tessa Hadley’s collection of short fiction, Sunstroke and Other Stories, that inspired me to check out a copy. And after reading the collection, I still have no idea.Hadley is a fine writer and carefully crafts her short stories, which take place in Britain, often in the 1960s and 70s. I enjoyed her writing, but her perspective on life was overall much bleaker than I subscribe to and enjoy.The stories take an unromanticized look at life, love, relationships [...]

    13. I do like Hadley's elegant and perceptive writing, so attuned to the way people think and act - it is classy and timeless - but having now read both of her story collections I find I vastly prefer her as a novelist. It is hard to fault her shorter work: her observations are always astute, she chooses words with care and deploys them with pinpoint accuracy, and I am always left with something to think about. But the academic settings and the socialist/feminist themes become repetitive and the sto [...]

    14. Except for the first story, I thoroughly enjoyed every short story in this collection of Tessa Hadley Each story contains flawed characters at a point of change in their lives, big or small, apparent or internal. Hadley manages to capture the emotional rumble underneath the surface with such succinct, poignant prose that makes you blush as you remember a time/situation when you felt echoes of the characters' thought patterns: their anxieties, squeamish/squirming moments, embarassments, awkward s [...]

    15. I'm always interested in stories that work with "ordinary people" and lives. What I really admired in this collection is the thorough descriptions of the characters, appearances but also mannerisms. It makes them vivid to the reader - really inspired me to be conscious of how this places the reader in the story, and certainly something I need to improve in my own writing.Some very powerful stories and well worth reading. I would have rated it higher but I started to feel that several themes were [...]

    16. I liked the short stories in this book, mainly because they were set in England and everything is better in England. My two favorite stories were "The Surrogate" about a college girl pining for her professor and finding a look-alike on which to play out her fantasies and "Exchanges" about two women who have come to a certain age and secretly want what the other has. "Matrilineal" was also very good about a girl who remembers a night when her mother left her father, but the mother denies that nig [...]

    17. This collection of stories are sososo pretty. Characters flutter in and out of each other's lives, grasping onto fleshy bodies in order to connect and disconnect. I like the subtle and sometimes not-so-subtle symbolization of eggs, and the weird doubling/patterning that materializes in the strangest ways. I was introduced to Tessa Hadley, like most others, from the New Yorker, and I adore the gasping, imperceptibly nuanced way she writes. It contains an exquisite movement to it and it's almost s [...]

    18. An overall above average collection, although I may have rated a few stories higher than they probably should be in my rating system. I thought there were a couple of duds (The Enemy, The Eggy Stone), but most of the others were pretty good. I particularly liked the first two (Sunstroke, Mother's Son), and the last five with the exception of The Eggy Stone. I thought The Surrogate, originally published in The New Yorker, was the best of the bunch.Overall: 3.71(2+),2(2+),3(2),4(2),5(1),6(3),7(2+) [...]

    19. “They only began writing a year ago: but it has taken hold of them both with a ferocity and a destructive importance.”*Tessa Hadley’s stories are about women and the quiet yet significant moments that catalyze life-changing decisions. My favorite in the collection is “The Surrogate,” about a girl with a crush on her college lecturer — who meets and starts an affair with a guy who looks like her crush. I didn’t love all the stories, but there were places in many that really made me [...]

    20. I owe a debt to Curtis Sittenfeld (who I haven't yet read but clearly now should) whose recommendation of Sunstroke prompted me to borrow it from the library last week. I ran hot and cold on the stories themselves, but not on the writing, which is decisive and dense with meaning but never feels effortful. I'll be picking up one of her novels next.

    21. Really good stories these are. Hadley is not very well known in The Netherlands, I think, but she deserves to be. Her stories may not have the force, scope and subtlety of the very best short story writers (William Trevor and Alice Munro come to mind), but they are very successful on their own terms. Nuanced portraits of (predominantly) women, often at some crossroads in their love life or family relationships.

    22. A great surprise. She's a crafty craftsman who can spin a tale. "The Eggy Stone" was my favorite story. Anyone who loves and desires to write short stories NEEDS to read this book. You have to pilfer everything she does lol. Only downside is the topic of infidelity gets a bit obtrusive after a couple of stories, yet it can be overlooked because her characters are so engaging.

    23. Tessa Hadley's stories unfold with unflinching candor and clarity, yet with a gentle undercurrent that softens the edges and pulls them back from bleakness. The collection has its weak spots ("The Eggy Stone," in particular, feels thin against the rich layering of the other tales), but as a whole, it's arrestingly lovely.

    24. I thought the stories were masterfully written. The observations and character descriptions were really well astute. but somehow the subject matter left me a little dry. i think its because the themes of the stories were so similar.

    25. I wasn't sure I was going to like this one since I had just finished The Master Bedroom which I didn't particularly like. I was pleasantly surprised. These short stories explored rather ordinary life events, and how people may not be saying what they really mean.

    26. Beautiful stories with strange endings that generally provide little to no closure. Lovely prose, though, and plenty of memorable characters. My favorite story in this collection was "Bloodbath", about two sisters venturing into adulthood.

    27. Perceptive and well-written stories, some of which appeared in The New Yorker. Handley has a knack for intuitive glimpses of her characters. Most of the stories are told from a woman’s perspective, several flash-forward to lend an ironic look at a prior circumstance.

    28. Why do people do what they do, think what they think? Who better than Tessa hadley to tell us what they think. Flawed, fat, old, misunderstood; each character in the story comes to life in his/her relationship with the breath of life from Tessa's desciptions. An extaordinary collection.

    29. I had mixed reactions to the stories, though they they share a style and themes. I felt most interested in the characters who had experiences similar to my own; she didn't help me connect with the other characters. (Or maybe I'm just a lazy reader.)

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