The Mainspring of Human Progress

For six thousand years men died of hunger Why don t we This is the basic question dealt with in Mainspring, but the attempt to find the answer leads into a wide range of subjects .
The Mainspring of Human Progress For six thousand years men died of hunger Why don t we This is the basic question dealt with in Mainspring but the attempt to find the answer leads into a wide range of subjects

  • Title: The Mainspring of Human Progress
  • Author: Henry Grady Weaver
  • ISBN: 9780910614023
  • Page: 127
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Mainspring of Human Progress”

    1. This what Henry Grady Weaver had to say about the Decalogue:The Ten CommandmentsFinally, as a last resort, Moses reduced the teachings of Abraham to a written code of moral law. Known as the "Ten Commandments," it stands today as the first and greatest document of individual freedom in the recorded history of man. Each of the Ten Commandments is addressed to the individual as a self-controlling person responsible for his own thoughts, words, and acts. And each of them recognizes liberty and free [...]

    2. I debated about how many stars to give this book. On the one hand, Weaver expresses some things brilliantly, pointing out how freedom is essential to human progress. Ask yourself: Why did the human condition remain largely unchanged for thousands of years, and suddenly make such amazing technological leaps after the creation of the United States of America?On the other hand, he portrays medieval Islamic culture in a way that was a complete surprise to me. In his world, Islam was a peaceful, free [...]

    3. An interesting but very superficial analysis of history. If it wasn't for the fact that I agreed with much of the author's thesis (the importance of freedom to human progress and prosperity) I would not have found it worthwhile. His characterization of the Saracens was candy-coated to the extreme, which then put the rest of his history into question. It has sat on my book shelf for over 25 years, so it was about time for me to read it. There were a few gems--which I will note if I can get around [...]

    4. This was a relatively short read that I thought was okay. The premise is that human freedom is what leads to prosperity. I basically agree with the sentiment, but the authors way of argument is essentially a whirlwind tour of world history, and how people trying to force arbitrary plans have ruined it for everyone else until the USA was founded. I think it suffers from some of the history seeming to be only "sorta true," if I remember my history right, and glossing over some negative details. It [...]

    5. This is a book I read and reread every few years to remind me of the gift I have been given to have been educated on what if means to be free.

    6. Book Review: The Mainspring of Human Progress by Henry Grady WeaverBy William H. Peterson“There can be no progress except through the more effective use of our individual energies.” The emblazonment of this quotation on the front cover of the new edition of Henry Grady Weaver’s classic is timely. For the thought gets to the heart of the Austrian concept of methodological individualism, a counterpoint to the Keynesian macroeconomic approach that requires national planners in Washington to m [...]

    7. Interesting Quotes:"Moses reduced the teachings of Abraham to a written code of moral law. Known as the 'Ten Commandments,' it stands today as the first and greatest document of individual freedom in the recorded history of man. Each of the Ten Commandments is addressed to the individual as a self-controlling person responsible for his own thoughts, words, and acts. And each of them recognizes liberty and freedom as inherent in the nature of man . . ."The first commandment tells the individual t [...]

    8. For most of the history of mankind, says Weaver, we have labored under the delusion that our interests are best served by an elite, and this view has severely suppressed human development.Only an individual human being can control the energy he generates.It is only when people are free that they begin to look for labor-saving methods.It is only when men are free that they begin to place a value on their time; and when men begin to place a value on human time, they begin to realize the importance [...]

    9. So this is more like a text-book type book, but I am a passionate American/history/freedom/politics person so I loved it. Actually it's a really easy read that is set up to move at a fast pace. The basic idea of the whole book is to look at the history of the world and see how mankind progresses when they are free to use their creativity. There's some very interesting world history that one doesn't normally learn about that was intriguing. He looks into different social and political groups over [...]

    10. This book is about FREEDOM -- and how freedom brings about greater human progress than anything else.I knew about how freedoms were virtually non-existent during the "dark ages", yet did not know that while most of Europe were suffering during that time, there were many areas around the Mediterranean Sea where great cities of light, beauty, and knowledge abounded, thanks to followers of Mohammed a thousand years ago. Nor was I aware of their many great contributions to our current society (unive [...]

    11. This book is an amazing piece of work that applies just as much in our day. The proper use of human energy can only see progress whre there is freedom. Yet freedom can be abolished as we become more reliant on the government or others who are more "competent." And as we become more susceptible to feelings of entitlement, we tend to give up our freedom because we want others to "take care of us." The author stresses the importance of personal responsibility and self-reliance.

    12. This book totally surprised me. I had absolutely no expectation for it, figuring it'd be some sort of history, retell the facts, textbook like book. But not only did it startle me with a voice of its own, but it was actually rather intriguing, pulling me right in. There is a lot of wisdom in this book, and I've learned things that will help me in my present life and definitely in my future life.

    13. William Grady Weaver is not a professional academic or intellectual but nonetheless makes a compelling case for individual liberty and free enterprise as prerequisites to human progress. This is a fantastic "gateway" book for people new to or curious about the liberty movement, particularly if you subscribe to the Judeo-Christian framework of ethics.

    14. This book is full of true principles that make the book worth the read - if it is the only political book you'll ever read. It also has a lot of roughly-truisms, hasty generalizations, and annoying informal language. If you are going to read Wealth of Nations, Human Action, and Common Sense - don't bother with this one. Weaver is written for the barely-educated, but willing to learn crowd.

    15. Very informative, but argumentative theory on what has made America the strongest nation. Written for the layman of history, it lays out an overview of the history of the concepts that America was founded on.

    16. An inspiring and uplifting book! I bought this title for all my friends and family =) It's super easy to read, and provides this great insight: human beings do not consume resources, they create resources. A must read for any person who has thoughts about global history.

    17. We read this in the eighth grade. What I remember most is the quote - all power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely - being said by Mr. Jones in his booming voice. I am including this on my children's shelf because it's funny to me that we read such a serious book back then!

    18. This is the best book I've found that lays out the principle's behind mankind's motivations, why past civilizations have risen or fallen by adhering to or denying these principles, and why we enjoy the freedoms and prosperity being in the U.S.

    19. A marvelous picture of why America progressed economically. Even though this book was written in the 1940's and therefore not current, I did learn from the author's overview of economics historically. This is not an academic read, but a profound one nonetheless.

    20. This is a great book. I loved reading about the reasons behind mankinds ingenuity. When you read it the truth of it really hits you. Everyone needs to read this book!

    21. This is a quick history of the US and lays out the reasons behind American progress. It is about human freedom to use their own energies as they see fit

    22. Very good, I'd recommend this one. It's very eye opening as far as world history goes, and how humankind has progressed because of freedom. You'll learn a ton from reading this

    23. I don't know of any better book. There is a section of this book which applies to all situations that could arise.

    24. I read this book more than 20 years ago and I am still thinking about it. It isn't particularly well written, but it seems to articulate some ideas that seem to be True.

    25. This is my FAVORITE book that I've read so far on a basic history of the world and especially the United States. LOVED IT!!!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *