Picturing Black New Orleans: A Creole Photographer's View of the Early Twentieth Century

Florestine Perrault Collins 1895 1988 lived a fascinating and singular life She came from a Creole family that had known privileges before the Civil War, privileges that largely disappeared in the Jim Crow South She learned photographic techniques while passing for white She opened her first studio in her home, and later moved her business to New Orleans s black businFlorestine Perrault Collins 1895 1988 lived a fascinating and singular life She came from a Creole family that had known privileges before the Civil War, privileges that largely disappeared in the Jim Crow South She learned photographic techniques while passing for white She opened her first studio in her home, and later moved her business to New Orleans s black business district Fiercely independent, she ignored convention by moving out of her parents house before marriage and, later, by divorcing her first husband.Between 1920 and 1949, Collins documented African American life, capturing images of graduations, communions, and recitals, and allowing her subjects to help craft their images She supported herself and her family throughout the Great Depression and in the process created an enduring pictorial record of her particular time and place Collins left behind a visual legacy that taps into the social and cultural history of New Orleans and the South It is this legacy that Arth Anthony, Collins s great niece, explores in Picturing Black New Orleans Anthony blends Collins s story with those of the individuals she photographed, documenting the profound changes in the lives of Louisiana Creoles and African Americans Balancing art, social theory, and history and drawing from family records, oral histories, and photographs rescued from New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, Anthony gives us a rich look at the cultural landscape of New Orleans nearly a century ago.
Picturing Black New Orleans A Creole Photographer s View of the Early Twentieth Century Florestine Perrault Collins lived a fascinating and singular life She came from a Creole family that had known privileges before the Civil War privileges that largely disappeared in the Jim

  • Title: Picturing Black New Orleans: A Creole Photographer's View of the Early Twentieth Century
  • Author: Arthe A. Anthony
  • ISBN: 9780813041872
  • Page: 133
  • Format: Hardcover
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    1 thought on “Picturing Black New Orleans: A Creole Photographer's View of the Early Twentieth Century”

    1. In a time when most people frowned upon women working outside of the home and Separate but Equal was the law of the land, Florestine Perrault Collins ran several independent photography studios. From roughly 1921 until the late 1940s, Collins documented soldiers, Catholic communicants, wedding parties, future leaders (like Ambassador Andrew Young, there's a naked baby picture of him in here!) and, most intimately, her friends and family. The book was written and edited by her great-niece, Arthe [...]

    2. My Review from Library Journal [Xpress Reviews, December 21, 2012]:reviewsbraryjournal/201Here is a perspective on New Orleans from 1920 to 1049, as recorded by the cameras of Florestine Perrault Collins (1895–1988), a Creole woman who broke barriers by becoming a professional photographer in a time when neither women nor minorities were a strong presence on that side of the camera. Through her photographs and the words of her great-niece, author Anthony (American studies, Occidental Coll.), r [...]

    3. It was a really great book and I loved all of the beautiful pictures. It gave you a sense of what a small part of New Orleans was like during the 1930s and 1940s.

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