The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language

The Sunday Times Number One bestseller and Radio 4 Book of the Week in paperback for the first time.What is the actual connection between disgruntled and gruntled What links church organs to organised crime, California to the Caliphate, or brackets to codpieces The Etymologicon springs from Mark Forsyth s Inky Fool blog on the strange connections between words It s aThe Sunday Times Number One bestseller and Radio 4 Book of the Week in paperback for the first time.What is the actual connection between disgruntled and gruntled What links church organs to organised crime, California to the Caliphate, or brackets to codpieces The Etymologicon springs from Mark Forsyth s Inky Fool blog on the strange connections between words It s an occasionally ribald, frequently witty and unerringly erudite guided tour of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language, taking in monks and monkeys, film buffs and buffaloes, and explaining precisely what the Rolling Stones have to do with gardening.
The Etymologicon A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language The Sunday Times Number One bestseller and Radio Book of the Week in paperback for the first time What is the actual connection between disgruntled and gruntled What links church organs to organised

  • Title: The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language
  • Author: Mark Forsyth
  • ISBN: 9781848314535
  • Page: 349
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Etymologicon A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Fulfillment by FBA is a service we offer sellers that lets them store their products in s fulfillment centers, and we directly pack, ship, and provide customer service for these products. Etymology Words, Language Grammar Books Online shopping for Etymology Words, Language Grammar from a great selection at Books Store. Etymology Define Etymology at Dictionary Etymology definition, the derivation of a word See noun, plural etymologies the derivation of a word a chronological account of the birth and development of a particular word or element of a word, often delineating its spread from one language to another and its evolving changes in form and meaning. Inky Fool I ve used the phrase time is of the essence all my life without realising that it has a quite precise legal meaning.I just thought that it meant something like get your skates on or show a leg or hurry up.But it is much stronger than that Time is of the essence because it s essential to the contract. Lion Eating Poet in the Stone Den Forsyth, Mark The etymologicon a circular stroll through the hidden connections of the English language.London Icon Books ISBN External links The Three NOTs of Hanyu Pinyin has a similar but different text, and it explains that Yuen Ren Chao s intention was not to oppose Chinese Romanization. Deregulering definities Encyclo Deregulering Deregulering is het verminderen van officile regelingen, wetten en bemoeienissen van overheidswege Een voorbeeld is de deregulering in het Wegenverkeersreglement in Nederland in de jaren van de twintigste eeuw die tot doel had het volume aan regels te verminderen door een beroep te doen op het gezond verstand van de weggebruiker. . Dagon Dagon Phoenician , translit D g n Hebrew , Tib d gon or Dagan Sumerian , translit d da gan is an Mesopotamian and ancient Canaanite deity He appears to have been worshipped as a fertility god in Ebla, Assyria, Ugarit and among the Amorites. The Hebrew Bible mentions him as the national god of the Philistines with temples at Ashdod Etimologia In linguistica, l etimologa dal greco , tymos, intimo significato della parola, e , lgos, studio indaga l origine e la storia delle parole.

    1 thought on “The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language”

    1. This is an entertaining survey of etymological examples, written in a breezy style, and constructed according to a clever rule: there is an etymological link between every chapter and the next, and the last chapter links to the first. Hence the title "a circular stroll." It is also a useful bathroom book, ideal for keeping the mind busy while the body is otherwise engaged.But Forsyth tries too hard. He is a genuinely amusing writer, but by the end of the book I began to sense that he really didn [...]

    2. Words are the strangest of things. And that is because they aren’t really things at all. Not things, at least, with fixed and final essences. They change and they morph and they even turned into their own opposites in ways that ‘things’ generally don’t. Well, unless they are caterpillars and butterflies – butterflies even rate a mention in this wonderful and endlessly amusing book. You are going to have to get hold of this, you know.We’ve become fooled, you see, by the OED – the fa [...]

    3. I’m sorry to say that as time went on I found this book very boring. It is written in a serpentine fashion, with the origin of one word slipping kind of seamlessly into the origin of the next, and it is written in a rather chummy down-the-pub kind of language ”when John grew up he began telling people that they were naughty and chucking them in a river. Now if you or I tried a stunt like that we’d be brought up by the police pretty sharpish. But John got away with it and, if you can believ [...]

    4. There can be few better recommendations for any book than that you continuously feel the need to read excerpts out to those around you, no matter what they are doing (or what else they are trying to read themselves). "Oh, this one is great."; "Just this one and I'll stop."; "Ah, wait, this one is really good too.". I've only felt the need to do this with two books this year — this one because I was really enjoying it, the other because it was just so ridiculous in places.The Etymologicon is a [...]

    5. As someone who really loves words and their meanings and histories I can't say enough how much I loved this book. I did not want it to end and now I want to find more books just like it. Some things I knew but I learned a lot. The joy is in finding them out so I won't give any away on here. This book was great from start to finish and for anyone with a love of words it is a must-read.

    6. A quite wonderful little book.This got onto my long-list because of these glowing reviews from James, Nikki and Paul.As James says:There can be few better recommendations for any book than that you continuously feel the need to read excepts out to those around you, no matter what they are doing (or what else they are trying to read themselves). "Oh, this one is great."; "Just this one and I'll stop."; "Ah, wait, this one is really good too."I did the same myself, at length.Did you know that avoc [...]

    7. Excellent book, great fun and very informative, witty and interesting - recommended to anyone who likes words and knowing weird, random facts about them. Additional point for being the best toilet book I´ve had in ages.

    8. If you are hungry for a feast of mildly interesting linguistic factoids with which to gorge yourself and potentially vomit all over everyone around you, never fear - this book offers a bounteous buffet. In the introduction, Forsyth admits that the reason the book exists is to give him an outlet for all of his rambling and useless etymological knowledge, so that he need not continue to torment acquaintances with it. "Unlike me," he says, "a book could be left snugly on the bedside table or beside [...]

    9. This is like stand-up comedy about etymology. I absolutely adored it. The book had me laughing within the first five minutes, and from there I was frequently giggling with quite a few bouts of raucous laughter. There is no real discussion of the science of etymology like you would find in McWhorter’s books, but the same amount of passion is there. It is the most aptly named work of nonfiction- it really is a circular stroll. One thought about a word flows seamlessly to the next and all the sud [...]

    10. This was amazing. Granted, I'm a word nerd, but this was really paced and organized in the most charming way, while still teaching me so much about common phrases and sayings. Forsyth is really clever and witty, and erudite on top of it all. It's a rare book that will make me chuckle and also teach me valuable and new words! Such a fan of this one.

    11. I love this book. [love (v.) Old English lufian "to love, cherish, show love to; delight in, approve," from Proto-Germanic *lubojan (cognates: Old High German lubon, German lieben), from root of love (n.). Related: Loved; loving. ]Right from the beginning it took off in a delightfully pedantic direction, with a casual encounter in a cafe turning from innocent etymological question into an explanation of the history and origin of every word ever, spawning the idea for this book. [pedantic (adj.) [...]

    12. Is it too geeky to have wanted more detail? Just a little too much repetition at times while a little light on some of the explainations. Still an enjoyable little read.

    13. I sometimes get sent to read a book that doesn't fit with popularscience but that I want to tell the world about. Such a book is The Etymologicon.I ought to get a disclaimer out of the way - this title is published by Icon, the same people who publish my Inflight Science, but don't worry, I've slagged off their books in the past.As the name sort of suggests, this is a book about where words come from, which as a writer I'm a sucker for - but anyone should find it fun. It's light, entertaining an [...]

    14. The subtitle sums it up pretty nicely: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language. Forsyth, the man behind the blog Inky Fool, is obsessed with where words come from and with wit takes you on a roundabout journey through his obsession. I started reading this fully thinking that I'd pick it up here and there when I needed a break from my current fiction in progress. But I pretty much read this book straight through and enjoyed it very much. The target audience is def [...]

    15. I fear my burgeoning interest in etymology has turned me into a crashing bore. I can’t get through a conversation these days without a digression into the history of a particular word. My mum was showing me her lovely in-bloom garden the other day and all I was able to contribute was, ‘You know, foxgloves were originally called Folks’ gloves, because Folks were what people called fairies…’ (Cue polite ‘oh, really?’)Apart from the health warning that this book will inhibit your abil [...]

    16. I normally don't pick up audio booksI have a difficult time with understanding and remembering. However my husband had this on Audible and since I love learning "where did that word come from" and "why do they call it that?", I gave it a try. Running the exact amount of time it took for us to travel to our destination and back was a big bonus.I think I need to get the actual book for future reference.

    17. This book is a giant adventure playground for language. Sometimes I felt a tad dizzy and needed to sit quietly for a bit.

    18. Sorry. I can only give it three stars because it was a lot of work to read and I don't think I'll remember anything from it tomorrow. Reading it was like binge-watching Jeopardy or something. And I did take frequent breaks, to try to absorb more.I will say that I disagree with the reviewers who felt that the humor was too strained or heavy. I am sensitive to that, and often make a similar complaint about other books, but I found Forsyth deft. In fact, I do like his writing style and will try to [...]

    19. The Etymologicon might sound dry, in theory: a book which takes you through a load of connections between words in the English language. But it's funny and the connections are well chosen to give you a moment of what-the-heck which really does make you want to read on. Some of it would be well loved by schoolboys, really, with conclusions about how we're orbiting the sun on a giant testicle. (Read it if you don't believe me.)It was a very good read to dip in and out of while sat in A&E waiti [...]

    20. Not the quickest read, nor the one I was exactly expecting, but pleasurable. I did learn a lot (lost a lot too, but of an overload of information) and Forsyth's voice as adorable. It was a good read, not especially noteworthy or too eye-opening after a while. Perhaps I would enjoy it in a smaller scale; I know there is a podcast for that.

    21. Although i found a few parts in the book a tedious read, the overall experience for me was a delectable one. Like i have been doing with books on Etymology, i have summarised a few points that i found informative. I shall post them here 'sharpish', and i would like to inform the reader that this book was my second in Etymology, and a multifold improvement over Bill Bryson's 'Mother Tongue' (For which i have written a summary, you can skip the book and read my gist haha). So here they are:1. A 't [...]

    22. Informative, and mostly entertaining. However, I read another book by Forsyth and enjoyed it much more. The "humourous" style starts to irritate after a while - its a bit like listening to an old fashioned comedian real off one quick fire gag after another. More a book to be dipped into now and again for an insight into words rather than read end-to-end

    23. I loved this book. So often I buy or borrow a book in the hopes of understanding where words or phrases come from. Instead of reading about a fun origin story, I end up with a boring book I have to make myself pay attention to. I got this for free through hoopla and figured I would listen to at least the first chapter or two in order to see if it was for me. This is the book on the origin of words I have been looking for these many years. It was everything I wished my previous books on the topic [...]

    24. In the preface of The Etymologicon, the author describes regaling a party guest with etymological trivia:"It was at this point that [the guest] made a dash for the door, but I was too quick for him. My blood was up and there was always something more to say. There always is, you know. There's always an extra connection, another link that joins two words that most of mankind quite blithely believe to be separate, which is why that fellow didn't escape until a couple of hours later when he managed [...]

    25. I found this utterly delightful, but then again, I also love A Way with Words, which one of my husband's friends recently described as the worst show on NPR, so I think it likely comes down to how much nascent interest you have in etymology. I enjoy those moments when I suddenly take notice of an old, familiar, well-used word and say, "Wait a minute, where did that come from?" This book does not have that much depth, but it makes up for it in a whirlwind tour of the English language that is funn [...]

    26. The kind of book that helps you pick new best friends; did you love this book? Find it laugh out loud funny, brilliantly entertaining and educating? Did you share snippets of the book with people? I loved this from page one and gave a huge sigh of contentment at the end (awesome end!!!) Learning etymology is always fascinating but if your teacher (Mark Forsyth) is clever and funny and seamlessly links the words in an non stop string you might find the book impossible to put down. Truly excellent [...]

    27. A good, if a bit of a shallow read.Honestly, it almost seems silly to review the book - if you like the sample on , you'll probably enjoy the book.The book itself is divided into dozens of short sections(few pages at most) that go as follows:1. An introduction to a root word and the origin of that word.2. The word is then traced throughout history to its modern incantation.3. A short paragraph using other related words4. A bridge to the next section.The book doesn't ever really deviate from this [...]

    28. I absolutely love this book. Mark Forsyth is an entertaining and witty host as he takes us by the hand and seamlessly traipses from one word to another to show us how words change their spelling, their context, their pronunciation and, ultimately their meaning, through time.The above sounds very dry though this book is anything but dry. Mark's genius is to follow an apparently random path through etymology by cleverly linking each section both to the previous one and to the one which follows.Obv [...]

    29. This is a nice little book about English etymology. There's not much else, really, to be said. It's not very deep; it's not very innovative; its tone of college humor must be charming in a blog that's read once in a month or week, but for a whole book, read end to end, it's tiring. It assumes knowledge when there's often confusion and controversy (no one really knows why a tragedy is called a tragedy — I mean, no one really knows what exactly the goat connection means). There are a couple of s [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *