The River Through the Trees

Decades ago, Dan and Grace Robertson encountered a childhood legend Bicycle Bob Some say he s an insane drifter with a taste for blood Others call him evil made flesh and claim his touch will poison your soul Some say he s just another country ghost story Now, Dan is a cemetery caretaker who prefers the solace of his work to the complexities of living people Grace peDecades ago, Dan and Grace Robertson encountered a childhood legend Bicycle Bob Some say he s an insane drifter with a taste for blood Others call him evil made flesh and claim his touch will poison your soul Some say he s just another country ghost story Now, Dan is a cemetery caretaker who prefers the solace of his work to the complexities of living people Grace persists as a strung out addict living on the fringes Grace has set a desperate plan in motion, and Dan is the only one who knows the root of her madness He alone can uncover the unholy monstrosity hungering beneath the surface of a dying town.David Peak s The River Through the Trees is a grotesque of impoverished rural life, a life of quiet acceptance broken only by drugs, death metal, desecration, and the teachings of an ancient book Combining the compelling pacing of Lehane, the cosmic terror of Lovecraft, and the defunct modernity of Ligotti, it is a taut, disturbing story whose haunting images bring to mind the dark places we do our best to ignore.
The River Through the Trees Decades ago Dan and Grace Robertson encountered a childhood legend Bicycle Bob Some say he s an insane drifter with a taste for blood Others call him evil made flesh and claim his touch will poison y

  • Title: The River Through the Trees
  • Author: DavidPeak
  • ISBN: 9780984978243
  • Page: 101
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The River Through the Trees”

    1. 4.5 stars!"The Thornapple's winding body and its non-navigable waters, bringing nothing to nobody. A steady stream of pointlessness. A withered worm in a rotten apple. A river surrounded by a stillness, whose muddy banks go untrodden, whose tireless, repressed rage goes unheard, out of earshot, trembling with inarticulate anger." The Thornapple runs through Ardor, Michigan, during the winter in which this story is set. I could feel the cold in my bones. It may well be that the the season is a sy [...]

    2. Wow! Once again, I am thoroughly impressed by author David Peak. His book of poetry, Surface Tension, was dynamic, full of imagery and shades of color. His novella, The River Through the Trees, pulls you right into the heart and soul of winter, and you are cold. So cold. The author's descriptions of the small town of Ardor, Michigan, are bleak and harsh, contributing to the desolate chill. There is a murder, and a myriad of secrets and hidden memories that become the background of desperate char [...]

    3. A single complaint: this book is nowhere close to long enough. I might have said that even if it was a 500+ pages brick though. The River Through the Trees is the most successful and true feeling telling of a 'rural noir' that I've come across ever. Language is great and the narrative is so visual that when thinking about the book in between reading sessions I actually saw the characters for my inner eye. This also made the cold and harsh environment come alive better than it most often does.

    4. 2.5*This one was probably a case of the book coming at the wrong time for me. I just couldn't bring myself to care about any of the characters involved. I picked it up several times, and DID finish, but I didn't feel "connected" to the events at any point.*Many people whose opinions I trust really liked this one, so I can only say it just wasn't for me at this time.*

    5. Excellent novella-length story. The tension here just grabs you from the first pages and then slowly ratchets up from there. The winter-in-a-small-town with secrets-to-keep setting works very effectively in a story that operates on two layers; that of a police-procedural / crime-drama surrounding a family-in-crisis and that of a supernatural horror thriller featuring both chthonic and cosmic elements. Powerful dread and quality storytelling skills on display here from David Peak

    6. Though an overt paranormal presence isn’t that pervasive in Peak’s novel, the weird aspects of the story blossom from the same dark soil noir sprouts—decay (rural here, while noir leans urban), and Jim Thompson’s proclamation ““things are not as they seem.” (I’m speaking of Noir as a distinct entity, and not synonymous with detective thrillers). Dark revelations on discovering just what is transpiring behind the curtain is essential in Noir, while the same pertains to the Weird h [...]

    7. Just three days in this town and I feel like I've lived there for yearsd need a hot shower badly! Dark, cold and sicklyd that goes for the countryside, town AND its residents. Sure, you're right there with Dan as he goes around town meeting his fellow neighbors, watching the drama unfold. But all the while, you have a feeling that something ELSE going on. I love the references to goats, and "hail bornless" tattoosd that Ram truck. And the urban legend of Bicycle Bob (view spoiler)[ and you're no [...]

    8. Nothing is hollow. Nothing is carved out. David Peak Pulls everything from beneath the snow, from out of the gnaw.

    9. A gripping meditation on the potential for situational depravity of small town life and people who have known each other too long with shades of Ligotti and Lynch.

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