The Last of Days

In the final days of Henry VIII, one man is there to witness the demise of a legend In his 100th novel, master historian Paul Doherty weaves his magic in an epic tale of murderous schemes and a bloody political order.King Henry VIII, a fearsome figure of power and stature, lies upon upon his deathbed diminished by sickness and haunted by ghosts from his past Only Will In the final days of Henry VIII, one man is there to witness the demise of a legend In his 100th novel, master historian Paul Doherty weaves his magic in an epic tale of murderous schemes and a bloody political order.King Henry VIII, a fearsome figure of power and stature, lies upon upon his deathbed diminished by sickness and haunted by ghosts from his past Only Will Somers, long serving jester and confidant, sees all While Henry is confined to his chamber, Will begins a journal that will document his king s last turbulent days.The country is fraught with tension The king s son and heir just nine years old, there are many power hungry councillors who will stop at nothing to better themselves Now as the king s health falls, rebellion threatens amidst widespread rumours of plots against him With few allies remaining, will Henry himself become the final victim of his reckless, bloody reign
The Last of Days In the final days of Henry VIII one man is there to witness the demise of a legend In his th novel master historian Paul Doherty weaves his magic in an epic tale of murderous schemes and a bloody

  • Title: The Last of Days
  • Author: Paul Doherty
  • ISBN: 9780755397846
  • Page: 393
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “The Last of Days”

    1. This is prolific author, Paul Doherty's, 100th novel and he turns his attention to the final days of Henry VIII. The story is told through the eyes of Will Somers, the king's long serving jester and confidant (coincidentally, author Margaret George also uses Will Somers as the narrator in her book about the life of Henry VIII - The Autobiography Of Henry VIII).The main part of the story takes place over the winter of 1546 and into the beginning of 1547. The king is sick, bloated and unhealthy - [...]

    2. Doherty 100th book, but by far one of the weakest one, at least based on those I read before. Over long, with innumerable descriptions that unnecessarily slow down an already meandering narrative. An extremely poor plot that goes nowhere very slowly, there is not much to rescue this over-bloated book. Shame as both the historical context of the court in the last days of Henry VIII with all its intrigues and the idea of having the story told by his fool had all the ingredients necessary for a gre [...]

    3. I find the author is just stretching the word count in this book. It's just dragging on and on. Ivery heard good things about Paul Doherty. Sorry, this book just doesn't do anything for me.

    4. usually cant put a paul doherty book down but really struggled with this to the extent i could not finish it which is a virtual unknown for me

    5. Review - The characterisation was brilliant. Will Sommers has been used before in The Autobiography of Henry VIII: With Notes by His Fool, Will Somers but not to this effect. It posed an interesting insight into the workings of the council and into Henry VIII's mind at this crucial point. Stories are often written about the divorce and executions of important people, but I believe that this is the first writing about this period. Not brilliant, however. What let it down was that sometimes the de [...]

    6. This book is written in the form of the journal of Will Sommers, court jester or fool in the court of Henry VIII. The novel is a mixture of historical fact, conspiracy theory of the day and fiction. We see,through the eyes of Will the extreme cruelty of Henry VIII even to those who have served him well in the past. Parts of the story are really harrowing, the hideous tortures and dreadful deaths suffered by those who either intentionally or in complete innocence cause offence to either Henry or [...]

    7. An interesting plot about the last days of Henry VIII and the securing of the succession. It takes a little getting in to as the story is told by the king's fool, Will Somers. Doherty gives an excellent portrayal of assorted Tudor monsters in Henry's court beginning with Henry himself - we see Henry desperate to secure Edward's future and tormented by the ghost of his conscience. He even talks to the corpse of James IV - a macabre encounter in a series of macabre encounters. I shall be looking f [...]

    8. This book was very good and will make a fine capstone or coda to Hilary Mantel's three Thomas Cromwell novels when they are completed. Recommended to anyone interested in detail.Note: I wrote a detailed evaluation of this novel some minutes ago and Saved, but for some reason what I wrote vanished. I simply don't have the time now to reenter what I wrote, but will try to recapture it at a future date.

    9. A bit disappointing considering how much I generally enjoy this author's works. The story was a rehash of other novels I have read about Henry and his vindictiveness and altho his theory of the king's demise is interesting, and his introduction of mysterious characters, there is no real catch to the story. I am sure there are other great books in this author's imagination. This just wasn't one of them.

    10. An intriguing look at the final days of the malignant monster-king Henry VIII in the words of his jester Will Somers. As everyone scrambles to hang onto power, not to mention their lives, in these days of madness, it becomes clear that the men about the dying king may be as unscrupulous and dangerous as their master.A fast, light read that would have benefitted from a greater depth of characterisation and more substance, in general.

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