My India

A memoir of life among the poor in India, by famed conservationist and hunter of man eaters, Jim Corbett.
My India A memoir of life among the poor in India by famed conservationist and hunter of man eaters Jim Corbett

  • Title: My India
  • Author: Jim Corbett
  • ISBN: 9780196623412
  • Page: 238
  • Format: None
  • 1 thought on “My India”

    1. Unlike Jim Corbett's other books, My India sketches the kind and tender human being within the ruthless hunter. With sympathy and concern, this book details Corbett's intense love for India and Indians, and also portrays the life, tradition and folklore of rural India - which at the time of Corbett are mostly remote from any modern transport facilities and secluded amongst other similar villages or vast jungles.The book reflects the childhood experiences of Jim Corbett and the making of Jim Corb [...]

    2. The book is a fascinating insight into India at the beginning of the 20th century through the eyes of a man who happened to belong to the race of the colonizers, but did not seem to think of himself as one. Every story is testimony to the fact that Jim Corbett could look at the people around him as his co-workers, friends and acquaintances without their race or nationality being of any relevance to his relationship with them. He talks as warmly of memorable evenings spent chatting in his veranda [...]

    3. Corbett's adventures are an interesting read. However, I picked up this book for a different reason. His writings reflect the English view of what were called the days of the Raj, which is what I wanted to read. Corbett's views reflect a typical Britisher's viewpoint of India as it was back in the days of the Raj. He is prejudicial, opinionated, humble in an odd perverse manner where he at one hand maintains his British superiority and on another hand loves his rural India. On one hand, he agree [...]

    4. I was introduced to Jim Corbett at a very young age by Dad who read to us The Man-eaters of Kumaon. Had never read My India though. It's amazing to see a foreigner speak about "My India" in such glowing terms. It reveals the compassion in the author - no doubt it's this aspect that changed him from a hunter to a conservationist. His pen pictures of simple folks he interacted with like Mothi, Budhu, Lalajee and Kunwar Singh are so vivid.The poignant tales of rural India warms one's heart. Especia [...]

    5. A very different Book than normal Jim corbett stories. Normally the stories related to various hunts are part of his book, but this book talks about then people of Northan Provience. It sketches some very memorable scenes and scenarios.Unfortunately after reading we realise that ground realities for very poors of caste torn north has not changed much since last 200 years :(

    6. This book is a wonderful collection of stories like the ones that you would hear from your grandparents about India during the British times, the ones you'd wish never ended. Thoroughly enjoyable stories of forest, wild animals, railways and people of India.

    7. Jim Corbett(1875-1955, 79yrs) was born at Nainital to British parents working in India. In this book 'My India' he writes mostly about two places: Nainital(Uttarakand today) then in United Provinces & Mokamah Ghat (present day Patna) then also in Bihar.Jim worked for 21 years as Fuel(wood & then coal) Inspector for Railways at Mokamah Ghat. Being an important junction where Railway travellers from the Western line descended to take a ferry over the Ganges to catch the Eastern Railway to [...]

    8. Not the usual stuff you find in Jim Corbett's books. There're few stories about man eating tigers but as a whole, this book's not as action packed as his other game books. You can read a lot about rural Indian lifestyle though. These people're extremely poor and they were totally cut off from the outside world, they lived an isolated life in the jungle, but they had their own ways of dealing with everything they faced with, regardless it's good or bad. It's really enjoyable to learn about these [...]

    9. I read this book as part of a combined edition called "Lives in the Wilderness".Mr. Corbett describes India and it's people in a manner which makes one feel proud of being an Indian. Especially heart touching were the stories "the law of the jungle" and "Chamari". The way the latter of which ends, "but if I'm privileged to go where he has gone, I shall be content", has left a lasting impression on my mind , about the great and down to earth Jim Corbett.

    10. Jim Corbett has showed his love for India in this book where he explains the beautiful moments he had here. There were many places he used the term Untouchables and Poor India representing the condition at that time. It seems that he always stood as a support for the poor in India. Nice experience as we feel ourselves inside the dense Indian forests. It was slightly boring in the middle and there were also some very interesting stories too. Overall it was a good read :-)

    11. You can feel the terror of the people who were victims of tiger attacks (and were lucky enough to live to tell their tale).You can feel the surprise of the tigers as they faced Corbett's muzzle, not realizing that that would be the last sight of their lifetime.You can feel Corbett's nerves as he stalked and baited the best hunters of the jungle.All in all - an exhilarating read.

    12. A collection of short stories of INDIA and People of India in Jim Corbett's time and narrated beautifully viewed from Jim Corbett's eyes.He has given some note worthy encounters of People of India who were working closely with him and others who made a significant contribution to shape his life.

    13. This well-worn hard cover edition was loaned to me by a friend who grew up in India. Corbett spoke at my friend's school and left a lasting impression.In one tale, Corbett speaks of a very good man who has just died, stating that he'd be very happy to go where this gentleman was headed in the next life.I'd be delighted to go to wherever Corbett is in the next life.

    14. I have read all the six books of Corbett and one of his biographies and consider him the most natural story-teller. This book is undoubtedly his best followed by Man-Eaters and leopard of rudrapryag. It is not about his hunting expeditions but his humane side and unassuming personality.

    15. Corbett has his style to win my heart. His love for those people is so well expressed that I'm craving to meet them too.

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