Beyond the Rainbow Bridge: Nurturing Our Children from Birth to Seven

by Barbara J Patterson, Pamela Bradley and Jean Riordan Perfect Paperback Jan 1, 2000
Beyond the Rainbow Bridge Nurturing Our Children from Birth to Seven by Barbara J Patterson Pamela Bradley and Jean Riordan Perfect Paperback Jan

  • Title: Beyond the Rainbow Bridge: Nurturing Our Children from Birth to Seven
  • Author: Barbara J. Patterson Pamela Bradley Jean Riordan
  • ISBN: 9780964783232
  • Page: 257
  • Format: Perfect Paperback
    • [PDF] Download ✓ Beyond the Rainbow Bridge: Nurturing Our Children from Birth to Seven | by ↠ Barbara J. Patterson Pamela Bradley Jean Riordan
      257 Barbara J. Patterson Pamela Bradley Jean Riordan
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      Posted by:Barbara J. Patterson Pamela Bradley Jean Riordan
      Published :2018-04-05T21:12:31+00:00

    1 thought on “Beyond the Rainbow Bridge: Nurturing Our Children from Birth to Seven”

    1. (edited)My family is not exactly a "Waldorf Family," however, we do appreciate the Waldorf style and philosophy. (And I have long since learned that I do not have to subscribe to any philosophy wholly in order to borrow from it). But this book really brought to light a lot of what the Waldorf philosophy rides on for young children and gave me ideas for bringing that into my own parenting. My children are a bit old for this book's teachings, though. I'd say that it's best for parents of infants u [...]

    2. Great intro to Waldorf early education. Really loved the ideas presented in this book. It has changed how I view simple tasks such as sweeping the floor, baking with Ethan, etc. Now instead of seeing it as a chore (that's a PIA), I look at it as a calming activity that doesn't need to be rushed, keeping in mind that my children are absorbing my attitude. The old fashioned way of life (the daily rituals--Monday is wash day, Tuesday is ironing day, Wednesday is baking day, etc) was very comforting [...]

    3. In trying to learn about Waldorf early childhood education, I read most of this book, very quickly. It's super easy to read, and the mystery of Waldorf is fading, finally. An awkward relationship to the belief system behind Waldorf has replaced my intrigue. The "science" of anthroposophy feels too much like faith, and faith would be fine, if it wasn't called science. This is not much of a review of this book, but this book led me here: It will be, for me, a tradition to borrow from, with lots of [...]

    4. I would say this is an amazing book for parents interested in Waldorf education. It was simple, but gave a great overview into the first years of childhood. A definite must read for Waldorf parents or anyone interested in it.Even if you are not, still a good read. Some great tips. The most helpful - using "you may" instead of "would you"For instance - "would you take out the garbage?" they can say NO!"You may take out the garbage now." It is amazing how great this works!!!

    5. I loved the chapter on creative discipline. The rest of the book was good, but just basic Waldorf philosophy, nothing that new or different. If you are unfamiliar with Waldorf, it would be a good introduction. If you are familiar with Waldorf, it might be a bit repetitive of what you already know.

    6. This book is similar to other Waldorf family/parenting books. The exceptional part, and chapter most helpful to me, is about Creative Discipline and the magic word of "may". It would be worth checking out at a library for this chapter. Otherwise the rest of the content gets covered in other books like Simplicity Parenting or You Are Your Child's First Teacher, which I like better. The format of some of this book is a bit hard to follow because of the recorded conversations.

    7. This book is an interesting guide to developing routines and environments that encourage children to develop into whole, well balanced adults. It is a sweet, nurturing approach to childhood, but is a little to gentle, inasmuch as I got bored and couldn't finish it. It may prove more useful when my daughter is older.

    8. First parenting book I ever read from start to finishspite Kavya's attempts to hide the book from me twice (meaning of that act not lost on me!). Good introduction to Waldorf early childhood education. Even if you filter out the Waldorfian references, it's a good parenting book.

    9. I thought it would be more useful for people not attending a Waldorf school - but clearly it was directed at families utilizing that type of school. In addition, a lot of the recommendations were too vague to be practical or I had read elsewhere.

    10. Lots of useful activities for engaging the senses. I love love love the tip for getting kids to cooperate. You use the phrase "you may" and it is working for my willful three year old

    11. I'm not totally convinced Waldorf is the way to go but I did glean lots of ideas from this book. Great sections on outdoor time, rhythms and doll play.

    12. Surprised that I didn't like this book more than I did. I've been reading about Waldorf principles for early childhood, and have liked many of them so far. However, this book delves so much into pseudoscience that I wasn't able to recover the parts of Waldorf which intrigue me. It's important to remember that Steiner was much more of a philosopher than an expert in childhood development - and that most of his "theories" are based solely on his own musings, not any sort of fact. (He also has some [...]

    13. This is going to be a terribly personal write-up that will probably not tell you anything about the book itself. I re-read this one for my Re-Reading Old Well-Knowns festival. I remember not liking it at all when I was a young mother. It felt preachy to me then, somehow. Now, I'm not finding any of that. Maybe I've been whittled by my years of actual parenting - all three of my kids are now seven or older - into something more humble and more certain at once, so I can meet the author where she i [...]

    14. Everything included in here was written in a much more interesting way in other Waldorf inspired books like my favorite Heaven on Earth.Maybe it was just my mood but the simplistic way that she offered solutions to common discipline issues turned me off. It's definitely not so simple and every child is so different! And seriously, why can't the kids just toss around the knitted animals?! You may toss these wool balls You may play with the knitted animals in the barn.Okay okay it must be my mood! [...]

    15. I really enjoyed this book. It took a while for me to have some quite to sit and read it. But the way it tells how to speak to children and the why or all of it I will find very helpful. Instead of giving choices because children get way too many choices and become self-centered, which I can now see it. I will try some of these things out for sure. One more great resource is the appendix has at least 20 pages of books to read with short summaries which I have been searching for.

    16. This is an introduction to the Waldorf model of education that was recommended to me by someone at the Seattle Waldorf school. It's definitely outside the mainstream of parenting and education literature, but a lot of it really resonates with me. I learned a lot. May be a little "crunchy" for some.

    17. This is a good overview of Waldorf principals. I knew most of it already, but I'm glad to have this on my shelf as a reference and a reminder. I especially appreciated the chapter on creative discipline, and the Rainbow Bridge birthday stories. I would recommend this to anyone wanting to try a more nurturing, gentle approach to early childhood education and development.

    18. A friend gifted me this book a while ago, and even though we don't have a Waldorf school in my area, there is so much I can incorporate in my three year old's development. Loaded with tons of resources and references.

    19. I really enjoyed this book. Even though, after researching and attending some Waldorf classes with my daughter, I decided Waldorf wasn't for us, this was a really good book. A good way to dip your toes into the world of Waldorf and learn a bit about this approach to parenting/education.

    20. One of the first Steiner parenting books I read, and I've recently read a second time. Easy to read, it explains simple but important principles such as the importance of rhythm, breathing in and breathing out time, and is a nice gentle introduction to Steiner approaches to early childhood.

    21. Excellent book to read if you are considering a Steiner Education for your children, very informative and inspiring, actually reinforced my decision for our children to attend Steiner School for their entire schooling years.

    22. Seems to be more about anthroposophy than Waldorf-style education - I wonder if they are as dependent on each other as this book makes it seem? I like the patterns in the back for Waldorf dolls, though.

    23. a good overview of Waldorf education, at least the early years. Great references and websites in the back of the book for craft ideas, further readings, story ideas

    24. I liked that this book provided a lot of "real life" examples. I know I'll be referring back to it time and time again.

    25. Patterson's book about Waldorf is simple and straightforward and a very quick read, but doesn't give a whole lot of practical advice for parents.

    26. I just finished this one. Of all the books I've read to try to incorporate Waldorf methods into my homeschooling, this has been the most helpful.

    27. Excellent, simple introduction to early Waldorf education. Love the child development section as well as the small section on creative discipline.

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