Managing With Power: Politics and Influence in Organizations

Although much as been written about how to make better decisions, a decision by itself changes nothing The big problem facing managers and their organizations today is one of implementation how to get things done in a timely and effective way Problems of implementation are really issues of how to influence behavior, change the course of events, overcome resistance, andAlthough much as been written about how to make better decisions, a decision by itself changes nothing The big problem facing managers and their organizations today is one of implementation how to get things done in a timely and effective way Problems of implementation are really issues of how to influence behavior, change the course of events, overcome resistance, and get people to do things they would not otherwise do In a word, power Managing With Power provides an in depth look at the role of power and influence in organizations Pfeffer shows convincingly that its effective use is an essential component of strong leadership With vivid examples, he makes a compelling case for the necessity of power in mobilizing the political support and resources to get things done in any organization He provides an intriguing look at the personal attributes such as flexibility, stamina, and a high tolerance for conflict and the structural factors such as control of resources, access to information, and formal authority that can help managers advance organizational goals and achieve individual success.
Managing With Power Politics and Influence in Organizations Although much as been written about how to make better decisions a decision by itself changes nothing The big problem facing managers and their organizations today is one of implementation how to get

  • Title: Managing With Power: Politics and Influence in Organizations
  • Author: Jeffrey Pfeffer
  • ISBN: 9780875844404
  • Page: 446
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Managing With Power: Politics and Influence in Organizations”

    1. This was the required textbook for my class, "Power and Politics in Organizations." While I liked the class, I wasn't a big fan of the book. The concepts that Pfeffer discusses seem worthwhile as far as they go, but I guess I don't especially like this format of presenting them--basically, presenting a concept and then giving several brief case-study-based illustrations of the point. In the class, I far preferred extended case study readings, such as Ken Auletta's narration of the (1980s edition [...]

    2. Part of my research agenda is to examine political behaviour in organizations. It's a topic that interests many, but draws the contempt of more. It doesn't take very long to discover that there is a widespread stigma against the topic. People would, at least explicitly, sooner see politics disappear than to involve themselves in the realm of interpersonal influence. Power, or the fuel of politics, suffers from much of the same wishful thinking. With the clarity and wit you'd expect, Jeffrey Pfef [...]

    3. Power comes from * Making others wait (example dctor's office): those who stay self-confidence themselves the one they wait on must be worth it, otherwise they'd be idiots doing it* Frame desired decision as 3rd between 4 possible alternatives, never the first: 1st under spec, 2nd over price, 3rd target, 4th lowever variant to reassure choice* Ability to support Conflict, if you have o enemies, you're not changing anything important*

    4. This was a really useful book, and Jeffrey Pfeffer is a well-known and successful writer on management and organisations. I have rated it at five stars and the book does deserve that high rating. In addition, I bought it on , second-hand for 85c. True value for money!The book makes a number of big, bold statements:o Nothing in human affairs is done for rational reasons. Always for political reasons. o If you don't understand power and how to use power, then you will never achieve anything substa [...]

    5. I started reading this book 15 years ago but put it aside. It directly confronted my naivete about how power, influence, and politics really work in large organizations and corporations. It provoked in me a reaction of cynicism. But now, after more experience in that world, I say "Yup! That's pretty much the way it is!" The book is not Machiavellian, it's academic. (I could almost say it's phenomenological in the best sense.) In the case studies Prof. Pfeffer examines, one can directly see the p [...]

    6. This is an interesting book about influence in organizations and how "playing politics" is usually far more important than the quality of one's work. Unlike many non-fiction books, this book makes suggestions about how to alter one's behavior in order to navigate the political side of an organization better. For me, it has been a very enlightening and discouraging read.

    7. seems like a typical thin business book but it's much deeper than that. I liked the treatise defending politics within organizationsnd of a "sympathy for the devil" type of thing. Interesting read, worth your time.

    8. A really interesting and useful book (however, much drier than Cialdini's Influence) for examining politics in organizations. Best concept so far: The very zeal and fervor that enables an organization to be extraordinary also makes it difficult to be cognizant and responsive to paradigm shifts.

    9. Good points behind the book, but too much text to make those points. This book could be half the length. It was a bear to get through quickly.

    10. Fantastic book--stood out among all that I read during business school on topic of organizational behavior. Worth revisiting/rereading.

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