We the Media: Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People

We the Media, has become something of a bible for those who believe the online medium will change journalism for the better Financial TimesBig Media has lost its monopoly on the news, thanks to the Internet Now that it s possible to publish in real time to a worldwide audience, a new breed of grassroots journalists are taking the news into their own hands Armed with We the Media, has become something of a bible for those who believe the online medium will change journalism for the better Financial TimesBig Media has lost its monopoly on the news, thanks to the Internet Now that it s possible to publish in real time to a worldwide audience, a new breed of grassroots journalists are taking the news into their own hands Armed with laptops, cell phones, and digital cameras, these readers turned reporters are transforming the news from a lecture into a conversation In We the Media, nationally acclaimed newspaper columnist and blogger Dan Gillmor tells the story of this emerging phenomenon and sheds light on this deep shift in how we make and consume the news.Gillmor shows how anyone can produce the news, using personal blogs, Internet chat groups, email, and a host of other tools He sends a wake up call to newsmakers politicians, business executives, celebrities and the marketers and PR flacks who promote them He explains how to successfully play by the rules of this new era and shift from control to engagement And he makes a strong case to his fell journalists that, in the face of a plethora of Internet fueled news vehicles, they must change or become irrelevant.Journalism in the 21st century will be fundamentally different from the Big Media oligarchy that prevails today We the Media casts light on the future of journalism, and invites us all to be part of it.Dan Gillmor is founder of Grassroots Media Inc a project aimed at enabling grassroots journalism and expanding its reach The company s first launch is Bayosphere, a site of, by, and for the San Francisco Bay Area Dan Gillmor is the founder of the Center for Citizen Media, a project to enable and expand reach of grassroots media From 1994 2004, Gillmor was a columnist at the San Jose Mercury News, Silicon Valley s daily newspaper, and wrote a weblog for SiliconValley He joined the Mercury News after six years with the Detroit Free Press Before that, he was with the Kansas City Times and several newspapers in Vermont He has won or shared in several regional and national journalism awards Before becoming a journalist he played music professionally for seven years.
We the Media Grassroots Journalism by the People for the People We the Media has become something of a bible for those who believe the online medium will change journalism for the better Financial TimesBig Media has lost its monopoly on the news thanks to the In

  • Title: We the Media: Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People
  • Author: Dan Gillmor
  • ISBN: 9780596102272
  • Page: 207
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “We the Media: Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People”

    1. Dan Gillmor’s We the MediaIn We the Media, Dan Gillmor discusses the impact of journalism by the people. Technology of today has allowed us to be writers in various ways especially via the powerful Internet. We are able to actively participate in discussion of the news through blogs, forums, chat groups, and email. Gillmor believes in the capability of people to make news today because current technology has encouraged and welcomed our participation. The internet has become a powerful media to [...]

    2. Dan Gillmor's "We the Media" starts a conversation about the direction of journalism (in the same way that he claims the news has and must become a conversation instead of a lecture). It covers the technology and history that made citizen journalism possible and then moves on to discuss the different venues and ways in which people report and some of the issues that arise from taking down the gates around journalism. He ends by discussing briefly his view on copyright, which he supports but thin [...]

    3. This is a very prescient view on the demise of Old Media and the potential of New Media. Gillmor was one of the earliest media pundits to really get it and the sound the alarm. Old media newspapers, distribution channels, presses, publishing, circulation, advertisements are getting disintermediated and re-created in new technological platforms, reaching out to vaster interactrive audience's. Gillmor tosses off some gems that you takeway. Yesterday's news was a top down lecture. Today's news is [...]

    4. I don't think that Dan Gillmor was the first one propose the idea that modern technology is evolving the ways that we produce and consume news, but he traced it and explained it in a way that was highly effective and very informative. As a student who is about to graduated and who is thinking of a career in media, it was fascinating to hear his take on the current status of journalism and what this means for the population. I like that he briefly traced the history of journalism. This set the st [...]

    5. Good book, with some interesting ideas in it, but an overly optimistic viewpoint over how locals will produce media. Relying on one or two individuals to provide high quality news to local residents just won't work, peopple get sick, bored, and won't forget its a hobby. More realistically is that local news could be the only possible solution towards saving newspapers, assuming they can persuade their advertisers that its more effective to rely on them than on google.My synopsis is actually conf [...]

    6. This book had potential, but it became out of date from the moment it was published and I often felt quite manipulated by the author. It just wasn't something I enjoyed and solely read it as I had to review it for my university course. Negativity aside mind, I think this book would be a little more interesting if it was re-released with a chapter or two on the twitter age and how it's effected citizen journalism.

    7. I think the fact that I read this on my computer (oreilly/catalog/wemedia/bo) affects my rating of the bookbut either way, I think it needs to be updated; I was expecting to learn more, but it is a good introduction to "grassroots journalism." I would not recommend it to citizen media geeks because you'll probably find it boring and outdated.

    8. This book is very interesting, I started reading it because it was recomended in a book that I read. I had never read anything about this subject but i was able to understand it, it is very concise and it has great information for people that might be interested in starting a blog or just for a person that wants to stay well informed.

    9. The field Gillmor covers here moves as such a fast pace that this book is already is in danger of being out of date. But it's still a thorough, involving introduction to citizen journalism and the democratisation of the media, which should be enough to convince most doubting hacks as to the long-term merits of the web (and blogging) as a tool for good, quality journalism.

    10. Interesting overview of the possibilities of citizen journalism. Because it's technology-based, some of the ideas and examples became a little out-of-date the second it was published. Also, the copyright section feels a little tacked-on. Still, it's important reading for news consumers.

    11. Une lecture de base pour quiconque s'interroge sur l'évolution future du journalisme, à l'heure d'Internet. (2005)

    12. Great book on citizen journalism. Gave me a better perspective on the future of journalism. It's a good read.

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