The Book of Dreams

Dana Faolan, the heroine of The Light Bearer s Daughter, has not adjusted to her new life in Canada and is using her access to the land of Faerie as a means of escape She s unprepared to battle the dark forces that threaten to sever the human world and Faerie for good It will take the help of all the protectors of Faerie many of whom were featured in the previous ChroniDana Faolan, the heroine of The Light Bearer s Daughter, has not adjusted to her new life in Canada and is using her access to the land of Faerie as a means of escape She s unprepared to battle the dark forces that threaten to sever the human world and Faerie for good It will take the help of all the protectors of Faerie many of whom were featured in the previous Chronicles of Faerie books , plus the assistance of a sexy and mysterious French Canadian boy, for Dana to meet the challenge of her destiny as a half human, half fairy to save her two worlds As Booklist said in a starred review, Melling s writing shimmers with magic, myth, and romance.
The Book of Dreams Dana Faolan the heroine of The Light Bearer s Daughter has not adjusted to her new life in Canada and is using her access to the land of Faerie as a means of escape She s unprepared to battle the da

  • Title: The Book of Dreams
  • Author: O.R. Melling
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 381
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • 1 thought on “The Book of Dreams”

    1. I still have a tattered copy of The Singing Stone by O.R. Melling somewhere in my book collection, and remember it fondly as one of my favorite stories to read when I was younger. I was quite excited to see a continuation of The Chronicles of Faerie, as I thoroughly enjoyed the first two books of the series (Hunter's Moon and The Summer King), and although the third (The Lightbearer's Daughter) was also a fun read, I didn't like it as much as the first two. What I liked about The Book of Dreams [...]

    2. I wasn't sure about this book. I couldn't get into as much as I did the other 3. I even had to put it down and read another book, and then come back to this one. The stories of each character I really enjoyed reading about, however, at some points in the book I got so over whelmed with too much detail about everything. I sometimes found myself just skimming through those parts just to get on with the story. In the end the story was just ok, I didn't find myself wanting more like I did with the o [...]

    3. I liked this better than the first Dana book. It definitely had elements that weren't quite right--a 9th grader knowing that she's with the love of her life is a bit odd, especially as there wasn't much build-up. On the other hand, I loved the exploration of Canada and the descriptions of its spirits. You don't hear too much about Canadian mythology, which is really a pity. (Also, Canadian fairies for the win!)

    4. A beautifully written book which draws on beliefs and folklore of a variety of cultures, including Irish, French-Canadian, Hindu, Christian, Chinese, and several native peoples, including Cree and Inuit. The pacing is good, although slower than some modern YA, the story interesting and mythic in quality, and there's a hot romantic interest!Read my full review:wandsandworlds/blog1/2

    5. A wonderful combination of many faerie cultures, from Ireland, to Canada, to India and China. Although the prior books can stand alone, this one you will understand much better if you have read the previous three.

    6. "Humanity needs to believe in something greater than itself. We need our dreams to keep us going."Strange to take a series that has been mostly set in Ireland and end it in Canada, I thought it would wind up back there after book 3, but the myth and explanations for that make a lot of sense and flow well inside the story.I really enjoyed this series, for it's beautiful imagery, headstrong characters (sometimes not even the main characters), excellent mythology, and great adventure.

    7. The Book of Dreams by O.R. Melling is a fantasy book about the Land of Faerie and the mortal world. This book is the fourth in The Chronicles of Faerie series. This book contains 680 pages/44 chapters. I think it is a mildly challenging read, due to the fact that there are quite a fair amount of words/phrases in different languages, mostly Irish, French, and Latin. (though there is a glossary in the back for all of the non-English words) This book can also be very challenging if you haven't read [...]

    8. The final chapter of Melling's chronicles was incredibly long, one of the longest I've read in quite a while. But astoundingly, it was also incredibly good, which is quite a feat for a large and rambling novel. The Light-Bearer's daughter, Dana Faolan, returns to the helm of this novel to continue her story, not in Ireland but in her new country of Canada. Dana isn't pleased about the move, and she can't imagine how she'll be able to live happily in a country so different from her magical, Faeri [...]

    9. One of the good things about the current YA Paranormal Romance boom is that a lot of older paranormal books are being re-issued. Among them were the first three books in the O.R Melling's Chronicles of Faerie, which I had loved (especially the first) back in high school. I was excited to discover the re-issues at my local book store, and also to see that a forth and final installment of the series has just been published.It had been a long time since I'd read the series, but the book was written [...]

    10. Really don't think I can give this a rating was a 700 page up-and-down story. Some parts were as low as 2 stars (the early parts, Jean's weird speech, and the Demon boat?) and as high as 5 (the aunts, Faerie, quotes from other works). I still am not sure about the setting. Ireland was everything that drew me into the others (as well as the romance, which is negligible with a 13 year old POV) and I didn't understand the need to include Canada at first. I now appreciate the whole "world wide famil [...]

    11. Final installment in the Chronicles of Faerie series! Dana is the daughter of a fairy and a human, and has been living in the human world with her father and her kind Indian stepmother. All of her life, she has been able to escape the human world when she liked to visit the world of Faerie through various portals, but now a dark and evil enemy has destroyed almost all of the portals. The connections between the worlds are hanging by one ancient thread, and Dana must find the Book Of Dreams, whic [...]

    12. this is the legend of how the first strawberries came into being, and it’s kind of nice because it’s a love story. i’m going to summarize it so if you don’t want to know skip over. one day a husband comes home from hunting to find his wife picking flowers instead of cooking. he angrily reprimands her for this and she indignantly walks off. the husband immediately feels sorry for getting so angry and tries to catch up to his wife to apologize but she’s too fast for him so he asks the su [...]

    13. It wasn't all that great. It was too long and felt a bit… unpolished. I don't know. I liked the Jean-Dana romance at first but then it became a bit lame. Especially because she's only thirteen. Love? yeah right. Storyline was cool but it just felt too much and too unwieldy. At times it seemed a bit blunt. Like a shallow cover for a railing against the earth's degradation, and at other times for dreams as a necessity for life (both on earth and in Faerie). There's some things about identity and [...]

    14. I liked how all the plots and characters from the earlier books were intertwined in this bookwas very glad to see some favorite characters from earlier. I did prefer the Irish setting of the earlier books to the Canadian one in this book, but the landscape depictions and descriptions of the fairies were just as beautiful as in the earlier books. My only real complaint is that not only was the glossary incomplete (several times I went to look up a foreign phrase/word only to find that it wasn't l [...]

    15. For the most part, this book was a sappy piece of drivel. The "we are all family" message was pressed so heavy handedly I had trouble finishing it. I thought the tying in of all kinds of beliefs and myths and legends was a bit stretched as well. I really felt like this book could have easily been 300 pages shorter. And, last gripe - what was with the sickeningly sweet pre-teen romance? It was too cheesy for words.The saving grace of this book was perhaps the last 100 pages or so. Finally, Canadi [...]

    16. This was good. It was fun to see some old characters come back. The books in this series always say that they don't have to be read in order, but I think that would help a lot. I did read them in order, but that was a while ago, and I couldn't remember a lot of what happened, so I occasionally felt in the dark. I enjoyed this, though. The flights of fancy, which seem (when I think about them) like they would bother me, really didn't. Actually, when I read this, I kept feeling like it was a Young [...]

    17. The books in this series always say that they don't have to be read in order, but I think that would help a lot. I did read them in order, but that was a while ago, and I couldn't remember a lot of what happened, so I occasionally felt in the dark. I enjoyed this, though. The flights of fancy, which seem (when I think about them) like they would bother me, really didn't. Actually, when I read this, I kept feeling like it was a Young Wizards book, minus some of the edge that those have. It was pr [...]

    18. The setting and length of the book compared to the first three can be daunting. However, the inclusion of the Canadian setting and history was brilliant. Canada is of all worlds. Canada's ancient peoples and the new Canadians (including Irish settlers). This book's lesson that we are all one family touched home with me. The love story was a bit hard (the main character only being 13) to embrace.A nice finish to the series, bringing all the characters together from the previous books. I can not h [...]

    19. I read the first three books in this series and LOVED them so I was excited to read this one. However, I read the first few chapters and couldn't get in to it. The writing was still good and the story was similar to the other books but I just did not find it as engaging. The first three books really went together well and I liked the Irish setting but for me, this book didn't fit in. I would have been happy with just the trilogy.

    20. Good - different than the others, as it's set in Canada. But the description totally lies - you do need to read them in order to get everything in the last book. The first three, sure, any order is fine. But those must be read before this one. I like it, and I don't like it, at the same time. Haven't finished processing everything yet. It's happy, but also sad. Interesting, compelling, and completely takes you in.

    21. At first I was kinda upset cause this book takes place in Canada, not Ireland, and I kinda felt like Melling was betraying Fairie in a way but not putting the story in Ireland. But then I realized that, once again, Melling has proven to be a wonderful author and I loved the book and the way everything pulled together in the end.

    22. This was a good book. There was a lot of great info dealing with Canadian and Irish folk lore. I would reccommend this book. The book was good, but it wasn't a book that I had to keep reading every spare moment (which for me is possibly a good thing, I get more done!) The first three books need to be read before this one. A very good series.

    23. I actually tried to read the aeons ago, but I accidentally read the end and didn't like it and couldn't finish the book. I'd forgotten the ending, so I figured it was safe to read now. It's not bad, it's the last book of The Chronicles of Faerie, and the ending made a little more sense after reading more of the characters' motivations.

    24. I liked this book. It was a good ending to the Chronicles of Fairie series. You would definently have had to have read the first three to understand where the plot is headed and who all the players are. Harvest Moon and Summer King are still my favorites in the series. Ms. Melling does a great job with Irish and Canadian folklore.

    25. Good story, but long winded, wasn't sure what happened to Crawley at the end there (too vague), and the end wasn't terribly satisfactory to me. Also, why didn't the author make Dana and Jean at least two or three years older? They seem a bit too young for falling in love and all- for crying out loud! Dana is only 13 in this!

    26. Although the book jacket states that the books in this series can be read in any order, I think it would have helped to read the others first since there are characters from the others that appear in this one. Having said that, I actually found this book to be quite fun although I thought the main character seemed more like a fifteen or sixteen year old than a just barely 13 year old.

    27. I think this was the first book in which I cried because I was so upset with the way it was going; all the wonderful characters I had loved in the previous books were dying off and only the new annoying part fairy girl was left. Thankfully I pushed through to the resolution where the book righted itself and it turned out no one was really dead.

    28. I love the blending of folklore that happens in this book. Not only does the book stay true to describing the fascinating, feral and fierce fairies of Ireland, it also brings the spirits of Native American folklore into the book! It blends two very differnt cultures together and weaves a beautiful and all-consuming tale that does not let you go, even after the last page.

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