Please, Nurse!

When Joan Lock began her formal training as a young nurse in the 1950s, she was unprepared for the strict discipline and long hours which were to follow and quickly realised she was no Florence Nightingale Her honest and humorous account of the next three years reveals her most intimate experiences of being a nurse from dealing with temperamental surgeons to fighting offWhen Joan Lock began her formal training as a young nurse in the 1950s, she was unprepared for the strict discipline and long hours which were to follow and quickly realised she was no Florence Nightingale Her honest and humorous account of the next three years reveals her most intimate experiences of being a nurse from dealing with temperamental surgeons to fighting off flirtatious patients Labelled a trouble maker, Joan and her friends tested their strict Sisters patience as they climbed through windows, slept through lectures and broke every thermometer that passed through their hands But through it all, Joan found herself touched by the people she met and their heart warming stories.
Please Nurse When Joan Lock began her formal training as a young nurse in the s she was unprepared for the strict discipline and long hours which were to follow and quickly realised she was no Florence Nighti

  • Title: Please, Nurse!
  • Author: Joan Lock
  • ISBN: 9781409128137
  • Page: 317
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Please, Nurse!”

    1. Enjoyable. They certainly did it different back then. This author tells a good tale, and I enjoyed her story.The final chapter though was different, but I can understand why she did it. I also was as amazed as her matron when she took the action she did before her final exams. It was like "REALLY, after all you have done" good on her though for not letting the opportunity pass by and good on her for standing up to the grotty patients.

    2. Joan relates her experience as a nurse in training in the 50s, the good, the bad, and the ugly in a frank and matter-of-fact manner.

    3. Oh to be a student nurse in 1950's UK. Did my training about 40 years later, so I worked with people who were able to remember the same things that the author remembered. Some things made me smile, the lucozade and the detol. The hospital accommodation, other students and the patients. I still remember one man who died of cancer nearly 20 years ago and how upset I was.

    4. (more like 2.75 stars)Mini review originally posted on Dreaming Of Happy EndingsWhat I Liked: As I am hoping to go into the nursing/midwifery field, I like reading about the training process, both currently and historically. I find this type of book very interesting.What I Disliked: I found this book very confusing. The tales of her training were all very scattered and it was as though a different story began in the middle of whatever story was already being told. Everything was very scattered a [...]

    5. I've read far better than this. Not sure why someone who seemed to dislike their nursing training so much would bother to write about it.

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