Revolt on the Right: Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain

The UK Independence Party UKIP is the most significant new party in British politics for a generation In recent years UKIP and their charismatic leader Nigel Farage have captivated British politics, media and voters Yet both the party and the roots of its support remain poorly understood Where has this political revolt come from Who is supporting them, and why How aThe UK Independence Party UKIP is the most significant new party in British politics for a generation In recent years UKIP and their charismatic leader Nigel Farage have captivated British politics, media and voters Yet both the party and the roots of its support remain poorly understood Where has this political revolt come from Who is supporting them, and why How are UKIP attempting to win over voters And how far can their insurgency against the main parties go Drawing on a wealth of new data from surveys of UKIP voters to extensive interviews with party insiders in this book prominent political scientists Robert Ford and Matthew Goodwin put UKIP s revolt under the microscope and show how many conventional wisdoms about the party and the radical right are wrong Along the way they provide unprecedented insight into this new revolt, and deliver some crucial messages for those with an interest in the state of British politics, the radical right in Europe and political behaviour generally.
Revolt on the Right Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain The UK Independence Party UKIP is the most significant new party in British politics for a generation In recent years UKIP and their charismatic leader Nigel Farage have captivated British politics m

  • Title: Revolt on the Right: Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain
  • Author: Robert Ford Matthew J Goodwin
  • ISBN: 9781306510523
  • Page: 277
  • Format: ebook
  • 1 thought on “Revolt on the Right: Explaining Support for the Radical Right in Britain”

    1. This is a much-needed academic analysis of the rise of UKIP, and it is clear why it was voted Politics Book of the Year 2014. It starts with a frankly excellent historical perspective on the party through an objective narrative, before moving on to a much deeper analysis of support and political consequences. However, at times the objectivity of the authors can be called into question, as it often slips into a celebratory tone - it is easy to see why UKIP sell copies at their conferences and on [...]

    2. Caveat: I am probably not the best reviewer for this book, as it is aimed at a non-expert audience and I am an expert.Revolt on the Right is the much-advertised and much-debated first academic book on the rise of the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) by two young British political scientists, Rob Ford and Matt Goodwin. They have published many academic articles and op-eds on the topic for the past years and are generally perceived as the leading scholars on the party and phenomenon. The b [...]

    3. UKIP have made an impact on British politics equalled only by the SDP in living memory. In just over 20 years they’ve risen from a group of academics clueless about the mechanics of politics to an organisation which has made breakthroughs in local and European elections, but as yet has no impact on the national political scene. Ford and Goodwin’s book divides into two sections. The first couple of chapters are a very readable and fascinating history of the party, detailing the often fractiou [...]

    4. This is a highly readable account of the rise of UKIP from the year of its foundation - 1991 - until the date of publication in 2014.It is a case study of a very English version of right wing populism, tracing a line of development from single issue obsession with the European Union on the part of a group of libertarian academics and a small group of backers. The authors' (there are two of them - Matthew Goodwin alongside Robert Ford) point to their limited appeal as long as they appeared in thi [...]

    5. I liked how this book was written for the most part. It didn't get too caught up in ideological positions on the political spectrum, and just tried to get to the root of what is motivating people in increasing numbers to vote for a more right wing, nationalist/populist party. There is some caricature of these people as left behind voters, which I am not sure is very reflective of what is going on with it. And there is also an emphasis on strategic means of placing these voters, rather than on va [...]

    6. Started as bunch of eurosceptics, UK Independence Party or UKIP had successfully fused their core value of euroscepticism with stance against immigration and westminster politics, thus making themselves a more populist party. In 2010 General Election, they even emerged as the party with the third largest share of votes. UKIP managed to tap into the left-behind voters from both Labour and Conservative Parties, people who felt that the world they know is slowly fading, who felt that the past gover [...]

    7. I only finally got round to reading this book after the General Election which saw UKIP nearly wiped out (LOL). It's an interesting read about the foundations of the radical right generally, though some of the conclusions it draws are, to me, slightly simplistic. Reading the conclusion, written in late 2013, is hilarious though. It states that Ed Miliband is likely to become Prime Minister; there is simply no way, even in a referendum, that people would vote to leave and the future of the Labour [...]

    8. If this book had been written by a couple of Fleet St political hacks with axes to grind - either for or against right wing polemics - it may have been given a rather more mixed critical reception. But you can't really argue with dispassionate academic analysis based on verifiable polling statistics and other credible information sources. This explains why, as one commentator observed recently, the book is now being digested by every head scratching special adviser and election strategist right [...]

    9. Released in March 2014, Revolt on the Right: Explaining the Support for the Radical Right in Britain remains one of the key texts on the steady rise of the populist right as highlighted by the increase in support for UKIP and the British electorate's subsequent decision to leave the European Union.Whilst I initially read Revolt on the Right: Explaining the Support for the Radical Right in Britain over a year before the EU referendum, it nonetheless remains an important piece of analysis for thos [...]

    10. While it’s almost impossible to produce such a study without value judgements on the underpinning ideology and policies bring analysed somehow seeping through, this book makes pretty good stab at a dispassionate analysis of where UKIP votes have come from over time. I love the analogy that up till now many had viewed the regular UKIP success in euro elections as: “like the mythical town of Brigadoon: it emerges from the mist for one day every five years, generates great excitement, but then [...]

    11. This is an era where democratic societies are giving birth to new political parties that are attracting broad support as they challenge the political status quo. The Tea Party, Le Pen (France), and UKIP in the United kingdom. Robert Ford does a very good job explaining the successful rise of UKIP. In very short order, UKIP has gone from being defined as an opponent of the European Union to a full-fledged opposition party that will have a huge impact in the next national election.How did UKIP dev [...]

    12. argues that UKIP attracts support from the white working-class which feels is left behind. I felt it needed more on which parts of the working class it attracts and which parts of the working class are repelled by UKIP

    13. The sheer amount of tables and evidence throughout the main body became so extensive it became meaningless. Nonetheless a good insight, explanation and history of UKIP.

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