Dangerous Allies

Australia has always been reliant on great and powerful friends for its sense of national security and for direction on its foreign policy first on the British Empire and now on the United States Australia has actively pursued a policy of strategic dependence, believing that making a grand bargain with a powerful ally was the best policy to ensure its security and prospAustralia has always been reliant on great and powerful friends for its sense of national security and for direction on its foreign policy first on the British Empire and now on the United States Australia has actively pursued a policy of strategic dependence, believing that making a grand bargain with a powerful ally was the best policy to ensure its security and prosperity.Dangerous Allies examines Australia s history of strategic dependence and questions the continuation of this position It argues that international circumstances, in the world and in the Western Pacific especially, now make such a policy highly questionable Since the fall of the Soviet Union, the United States has also changed dramatically, making it less relevant to Australia and a less appropriate ally on which Australia should rely.Malcolm Fraser argues that Australia should adopt a much greater degree of independence in foreign policy, and that we should no longer merely follow other nations into wars of no direct interest to Australia or Australia s security He argues for an end to strategic dependence and for the timely establishment of a truly independent Australia See at mup items 136891 s
Dangerous Allies Australia has always been reliant on great and powerful friends for its sense of national security and for direction on its foreign policy first on the British Empire and now on the United States Aust

  • Title: Dangerous Allies
  • Author: Malcolm Fraser Cain Roberts
  • ISBN: 9780522862652
  • Page: 416
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Dangerous Allies”

    1. Warning from a former PM Of AustraliaAustralia’s overwhelmingly dependency on just one great power is a major weakness. We have regularly partaken in ‘wars’ that don’t make any strategic sense and have had questionable outcomes. It’s time to grow up and be a better and smarter partner.

    2. A self-serving book that could have, potentially, made a powerful case for the revision of the Australian-US alliance. Fraser was primed to bring the discussion of the strategic dependence of Australia on the US, which has been an old discussion topic in foreign policy circles, to the public. Certainly, he is a skilled enough writer, a liked enough personality, with enough political experience in the status quo to suggest radical ideas. Indeed, it's the best role for a former Prime Minister. How [...]

    3. This book is the last word on the debate about Australia's Foreign Policy 'independence'. The last word because the case is a bust. At heart this book is a ho-hum recitation of the long hymn of 'independence' which was sung most prominently and successfully by Fraser's arch rival Gough Whitlam and generations of lefties ever since. Now however, Fraser has joined them, thanks to a good research assistant and with barely an acknowledgement except to claim some of Robert McNamara's legacy for himse [...]

    4. It was when I was reading Simon Mawer’s Tightrope (see my review) and came across the part about the American betrayal of its allies in the late stages of WW2, that I remembered that I wanted to read Dangerous Allies by Malcolm Fraser in which he argues that Australia should be more independent of the US in its foreign policy. The notable point about this opinion being that Fraser was a Defence Minister who acquiesced to the Americans, sending men too young to vote to fight and die in the Viet [...]

    5. Dangerous Allies is an excellent read and a must read for Australians interested in the welfare of their country. Former Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser earned the ire of the left, because he participated, probably unknowingly, in what was effectively a CIA lead coup d'etat in Australia in 1975. After leaving national politics he developed an exemplary humanitarian International profile. He was a member of the Asia-Pacific Leadership Network for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament. The value [...]

    6. Malcolm Fraser pens a decent argument here for Australia to step away from its historical leanings of being dependent upon world superpowers for its defence and to forge its own way in international affairs. Two thirds of this incredibly well researched book is on the history of Australia's defence policy and then the last third left to why we should look to our own defence instead of piggybacking on the biggest kid in the yard. What is unfortunately all too obviously missing is the how Australi [...]

    7. Interesting insights from a prime minister who started his prime ministership under dubious circumstances and was mediocre in many respects. However, his arguments are well formed, and in the later years of his life he constantly fought for less fortunate people in society. His arguments certainly made me think about how different Australian and American values are, and the lack of foresight and intelligence of Australians. A lot of it comes down to Australians doing their military on the cheap, [...]

    8. Rambles on in parts, but the overall theme of Australia following its past and present "colonial giants", and what it should do about its own foreign policy were a most interesting read from this former Liberal (read: conservative) Prime Minister.

    9. Malcolm Fraser writes on the history of Australia's strategic alliances and outlines a draft for a new, independent, direction.

    10. An interesting and compelling argument about Australia's foreign policy - though a tad dry and a little sloppily written at times. Also a little harsh on Japan I feel.

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