La biblioteca de Babel

Cuento La biblioteca de Babel.
La biblioteca de Babel Cuento La biblioteca de Babel

  • Title: La biblioteca de Babel
  • Author: Jorge Luis Borges
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 264
  • Format: ebook
  • 1 thought on “La biblioteca de Babel”

    1. In Borges's short story, the world consists of a gigantic library which contains every possible book that can ever be written. So, somewhere, there must logically be the book, the one that reveals the Library's secret! Unfortunately, there is no filing system, and no one has any idea of how to find the elusive book. In fact, it's challenging even to locate one which contains a meaningful sentence: most of them are gibberish from beginning to end. Well, our own world isn't quite as bad - but it's [...]

    2. Hey, you. Yea, I am talking to you! Do you want to get freaked out by the sheer magnitude of an idea that's right in front of you? Step right in!In this short story, Author Jorge Luis Borges envisions a universe in the form of a vast library, a library of meticulous pattern and structure. In this library, you can find an incomprehensible number of hexagonal rooms with a specific number of books: Books that contain all knowledge of the universe. But here is the catch: All this knowledge is mixed [...]

    3. So, this is a short story, but there is so much in it that I reread it a half dozen times, found a few audio readings and looked up summaries trying to grasp the whole story. Basically its weird, but cool.In this guys universe the world is made up of libraries. Each room is a hexagon with two small closets. One is a bathroom and the other is a room to sleep standing up. People are born, live and die in these rooms.Now here is where it gets really bad. There are only four shelves of books in each [...]

    4. “For a book to exist, it is sufficient that it is possible. Only the impossible is excluded.”Paradoxes abound in this allegory that has aspects of The Blind Watchmaker, especially DNA, and also the Infinite Monkey Theorem. I have the Collected Fictions (with copious translator's notes), but am splitting my review of that into its components, in publication order: Collected Fictions - all reviews. This is one of the the longer stories in The Garden of Forking Paths, published in 1941.The univ [...]

    5. I read "The Library of Babel," one of Jorge Luis Borges’ most famous stories, as part of the Ficciones collection. “The Library of Babel” posits a universe in the form of a library made out of connected hexagonal rooms, each room filled with books and the barest necessities for life. Each book contains 410 pages, with 40 lines of 80 letters each. There are 25 letters and punctuation marks in the alphabet. The Library contains every possible combination of those letters. Most of the books a [...]

    6. Found this to be a great analogy to the world we live in. Everyone seems to have the answer to all of life's problems, but the issue is it's not so simple to sort through all of the variables when you have little to no means of measuring each option. That's pretty much how I read this short story, in life it is feasible to live the 'perfect' life, since the variables are there, however since there is no distinctive guide to do so, we are forced to do our best to sort through the gibberish (in th [...]

    7. بورخس رو خيليا دوست ندارن، و خيلي بيشتر از اون خيليا، بار اول دوستش ندارن. دو بار خوندمش پشت هم تا فهميدم چي شد، شايدم هنوز كامل نفهميدما! از شدت پست مدرني گاهي شبيه به مقاله ميشه، از اون مقاله ها كه خط بعدو ميخوني خط قبلو يادت ميره، بي نظير بود. Borges! Welcome to favorite zone!

    8. In the brief prose piece The Four Cycles Jorge Luis Borges wrote that there are only four stories in the world: the story of war, the story of return, the story of search and the story of sacrifice (Troy, Ulysses, Jason, Christ). “Four are the stories. During the time left to us we will continue telling them, transformed.”And there is no other writer who can retell these four stories the way Jorge Luis Borges does transforming them into intellectual labyrinths and scholarly conundrums. He tu [...]

    9. You who read me - are you certain you understand my language?Understanding? Certain? Wouldn't even pretend. A Kaleidoscope of earlier ideas like Borel's dactylographic monkey theorem, Pascal's metaphor and Robert Burton's variations, a mathematical thought experiment with infinities and labyrinths that employs cabalistic reasoning which blurs the infinite and the finite with philosophical implications that puts the Gita in mind, a melting pot of motifs that would influence Eco's influential mast [...]

    10. Easily one of the strangest books I've ever read. I actually ordered it by accident, thinking it was an anthology. But actually this entire slender volume is devoted to one Borges short story, complete with beautiful etchings showing that his impossible library is actually possible. While it's not worth the cover price for everyone, anyone who dismissed his fictional library should flip through these pages and see that he wasn't writing flippantly. As "Library of Babel" was possibly Borges' most [...]

    11. Jorge Luis Borges, one of the most imaginative writers I have come across, could have been a mathematician, a physicist, a philosopher or a theologian. I can see his influence on Umberto Eco in the manipulation of text and the blending between fiction and reality. To read Borges is to immerse myself in a magical world where the concept of infinity manifests in space and time, where the boundary between dream and reality fades, where the past and the future converge into an instant, where levels [...]

    12. " I am perhaps misled by old age and fear, but I suspect that the human species - the only species - teeters at the verge of extinction, yet that the Library enlightened, solitary, infinite, perfectly unmoving, armed with precious volumes, pointless, incorruptible, and secret-will endure."

    13. This story is not fiction. The library of babel exists. You can view it here: libraryofbabelfo/At present, the site has catalogued every possible combination of 3200 characters. You can read how its done on the site – its really incredible. You can type in any paragraph, from the opening of your own novel to the end of your favorite thriller, and find that it already exists in a specific page of a specific book on a specific shelf in the library.Navigating the site is an eerie experience. You [...]

    14. Tak mudah mengunyah Borges walaupun kau suka dengan intelegenius yang dia anyam. Perlu berhati-hati menelan patah perkataannya, sedang sekarang adalah zaman pantas yang penuh dengan junkfood melimpah-ruah.

    15. Un libro increíble. Una imaginación alucinante. La matemática en muchas direcciones. No me cansaré de leer a Borges. Cómo quisiera regalarle una biblioteca de babel a cada uno de mis estudiantes.

    16. A universe in the form of a vast library containing all possible 410-page books of a certain format.Twenty-five symbols (twenty-two letters, the space, the period, the comma), whose recombinations and repetitions encompass everything possible to express in all languages. The totality of such variations would form a Total Library of astronomical size. The view of the universe as a sphere having its center everywhere and its circumference nowhere. The library will contain every poem, play and nove [...]

    17. This is a fantastic and thought provoking book. I first heard of it while reading this essay by Christopher Rowe.I know that Borges is really discussing the history, and completeness, of human knowledge but his essay, as Rowe suggests, has marked implications for those trying to create a universal library today. Such entities might include Google or , amongst others. The sheer futility of gathering every last letter of every last book that has ever existed, or that could possibly have existed, i [...]

    18. Imagine that the Universe could be a libraryd the worlds its books. It's important that we all read this story because it's the story of our shared experiences of our shared humanity. It's a short story yet an epic. And speaking anymore of it would disturb its outrageously imaginative story line. Read it. You will be glad you did! 4.5 stars.

    19. As a fan of Umberto Eco and The Name of the Rose I knew that Borges and Joyce were required reading. This short story by Borges is brilliant and demands many more readings. His influence on Eco is clearly seen. Looking forward to reading more of his work, and then on to Joyce!

    20. "When I am dead, compassionate hands will throw me over the railing; my tomb will be the unfathomable air, my body will sink for ages, and will decay and dissolve in the wind engendered by my fall, which shall be infinite."

    21. You who read me, are you sure you’re understanding my language?Nope, not this time Borges. I still like you!!!

    22. An extended metaphor for infinite knowledge and the inconceivable scope of the universe. There’s no story; it’s just a very long piece of fictional discourse that begs one to consider the phenomenon that if all knowledge was within human reach, it would be impossible to either consume it in it’s entirety, or uncover the prime source that reveals all meaning.Alas, Google has kind of made the entire concept out-dated. A simple search engine—yes, even Bing would suffice—completely nullifi [...]

    23. (Perhaps my old age and fearfulness deceive me, but I suspect that the humanspecies --the unique species -- is about to be extinguished, but the Library willendure, illuminated, solitary, infinite, perfectly motionless, equipped with preciousvolumes, useless, incorruptible, secret.You who read me, are You sure of understanding my language?)Anyone who loves books must read this short story by Jorge Luis Borges, ,It is incredibly, amazing <3

    24. Extraordinary, thought-provoking, and intelligent. The story trods along the border of allegory/satire and pure fiction. Profound philosophical undertones too. Small enough to give a read without any prior-contemplation. :)

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