A Field Guide to Stars and Planets

The fourth edition of this best selling field guide was revised and updated to include the latest information As of the 14th printing June 2016 the cover medallion says Pluto Flyby Included , all the time sensitive material is valid through 2020 solar eclipses, phases of the moon, positions of the planets, and Twenty four Monthly Sky Maps, revised and in color,The fourth edition of this best selling field guide was revised and updated to include the latest information As of the 14th printing June 2016 the cover medallion says Pluto Flyby Included , all the time sensitive material is valid through 2020 solar eclipses, phases of the moon, positions of the planets, and Twenty four Monthly Sky Maps, revised and in color, show exactly what you ll see when facing north or south in the night sky Fifty two Atlas Charts, also revised and in color, cover the entire sky, including close ups of areas of special interest such as the Pleiades and the Orion Nebula Two dozen pages cover the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse whose path crosses the continental United States, how and where to view it, and other aspects of current and future solar eclipses.
A Field Guide to Stars and Planets The fourth edition of this best selling field guide was revised and updated to include the latest information As of the th printing June the cover medallion says Pluto Flyby Included all the

  • Title: A Field Guide to Stars and Planets
  • Author: Jay M. Pasachoff Roger Tory Peterson Wil Tirion
  • ISBN: 9780395934319
  • Page: 377
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “A Field Guide to Stars and Planets”

    1. I checked this dense compact field guide out from my local library in the hopes of using it in the field with my telescope. Due to its size and weight, I found it nearly useless to use in the dark with my red flashlight at my telescope. The atlases were too small, requiring my reading glasses, and the binding too stiff and tight to allow the field guide to be laid flat and free up a hand to adjust the telescope. The information provided in the guide appears current as of a dozen years ago (circa [...]

    2. Why is it that astronomers can chart the planet and such centuries ahead but then they put out a guide it is almost outdated on the issue date?

    3. I read this thick, hybrid reference book and explanatory tome in tiny chunks over a six-month period. I know it’s out of date (and there is at least a fourth edition available), but it was the object at hand and I figured that, aside from information on exoplanets and steadily incoming information about our solar system, the data for stars and the definitions of astronomical terms can’t have changed too much since 1992 (with a few 1997 updates in this edition), can they? The book patiently e [...]

    4. Pasachoff, J. M. (Ed.). (2000). A field guide to stars and planets. R. T. Peterson (Ed.). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.Reviewed by: Melanie WyattCategory: AtlasCall #: 523Price: $19.00Description: This book is a field guide to the stars and planets, providing introductory tours of the night sky; twenty-four monthly sky maps, fifty-two atlas charts that cover the entire sky, and tips on how to choose telescopes and binoculars.Content/scope: The purpose of the book, content and scope are [...]

    5. I luv, luv, luv the stars (& the moon). Every chance I get I spend hours flipping books like these. Reading tidbits here & there, going back to the beganing to go thru again. I like "Guides", concise,information - text gets right down to the pt. It is a quite a dense read. But @ look all the photographes, their beautiful. the universe is miraculous!

    6. this is an absolute must for any stargazer! anyone familiar with peterson guides knows they are easy to use and also comprehensive. it has also inspired me to explore my hobby of photography a little further. fyi lunar eclipse 8/28/07 visible from the west coast

    7. Like most Peterson Field Guides there is lots of good information about the subject matter other than pure identification. I learned a lot about the nuts and bolts of sky watching by reading this field guide from cover to cover (just skimming most of the charts and tables of course).

    8. Text and maps are small and difficult to see at night, but overall content is wonderful! It contains the content of a textbook but is pocket-sized and easy to carry.

    9. Actually, not bad, as far as Peterson guides go. Uses H. A. Rey's constellation paradigm. My copy is ancient.

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