A Country Called Prison: Mass Incarceration and the Making of a New Nation

The United States is the world leader in incarcerating citizens 707 people out of every 100,000 are imprisoned If those currently incarcerated in the US prison system were a country, it would be the 102nd most populated nation in the world Aside from looking at the numbers, if we could look at prison from a new viewpoint, as its own country rather than an institution maThe United States is the world leader in incarcerating citizens 707 people out of every 100,000 are imprisoned If those currently incarcerated in the US prison system were a country, it would be the 102nd most populated nation in the world Aside from looking at the numbers, if we could look at prison from a new viewpoint, as its own country rather than an institution made up of walls and wires, policies and procedures, and legal statutes, what might we be able to learn In A Country Called Prison, Mary Looman and John Carl propose a paradigm shift in the way that American society views mass incarceration Weaving together sociological and psychological principles, theories of political reform, and real life stories from experiences working in prison and with at risk families, Looman and Carl form a foundation of understanding to demonstrate that prison is than an institution built of fences and policies it is a culture Prison continues well after incarceration, as ex felons leave correctional facilities and often return to impoverished neighborhoods without money or legal identification of American citizenship Trapped in the isolation of poverty, these legal aliens turn to illegal ways of providing for themselves and are often reimprisoned This situation is unsustainable and America is clearly facing an incarceration epidemic that requires a new perspective to eradicate it A Country Called Prison offers concrete, feasible, economical suggestions to reform the prison system and help prisoners return to a healthier life after incarceration.
A Country Called Prison Mass Incarceration and the Making of a New Nation The United States is the world leader in incarcerating citizens people out of every are imprisoned If those currently incarcerated in the US prison system were a country it would be the

  • Title: A Country Called Prison: Mass Incarceration and the Making of a New Nation
  • Author: Mary Looman John Carl
  • ISBN: 9780190211035
  • Page: 295
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “A Country Called Prison: Mass Incarceration and the Making of a New Nation”

    1. I believe this is a must read book. Anyone that wants to know more about the Corrections system in American shoud read this book. It gives a history of corrections, facinating scary statistics on incarceration in America and ideas to help change the epidemic that is occurring in America. Why are we throwing away people's lives for non violent offenses. Prisons are not correcting, they are just warehouse for adult babysitting. Things must change our American will go bankrupt on incarcerating peop [...]

    2. Brilliant book about mass incarceration in the USA. How ex felons survive on the outside world when leaving prison, where ina population of 1000,000 people over 707 are being incarcerated, how it affects families, real life stories, at risk families living on the poverty line, impoverished neighbourhood, how this epidemic has embraced the USDA. Loved the book, touches on how we perceive prison from beginning to the end.

    3. An interesting premise, but unfortunately amateurish writing (in my opinion). I wish it had gone a bit deeper. Nonetheless, it's a thoughtful addition to the literature on American prisons and prison history.

    4. This one was a galley. Etiquette demands that I contact the publisher rather than write the review I would be writing if I had paid for the book. That's all there is and there is no more.

    5. While good in its intentions, I found this to be a book that was just too scattered and disjointed to be useful. Perhaps more useful are the articles and studies referenced within. #netgalley

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