Hawthorne in Concord

On his wedding day in 1842, Nathaniel Hawthorne escorted his new wife, Sophia, to their first home, the Old Manse in Concord, Massachusetts There, enriched by friendships with Thoreau and Emerson, he enjoyed an idyllic time But three years later, unable to make enough money from his writing, he returned ingloriously, with his wife and infant daughter, to live in his mothOn his wedding day in 1842, Nathaniel Hawthorne escorted his new wife, Sophia, to their first home, the Old Manse in Concord, Massachusetts There, enriched by friendships with Thoreau and Emerson, he enjoyed an idyllic time But three years later, unable to make enough money from his writing, he returned ingloriously, with his wife and infant daughter, to live in his mother s home in Salem.In 1853 Hawthorne moved back to Concord, now the renowned author of The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables Eager to resume writing fiction at the scene of his earlier happiness, he assembled a biography of his college friend Franklin Pierce, who was running for president When Pierce won the election, Hawthorne is appointed the lucrative post of consul in Liverpool.Coming home from Europe in 1860, Hawthorne settled down in Concord once He tried to take up writing one last time, but deteriorating health finds him withdrawing into private life In Hawthorne in Concord, acclaimed historian Philip McFarland paints a revealing portrait of this well loved American author during three distinct periods of his life, spent in the bucolic village of Concord, Massachusetts.
Hawthorne in Concord On his wedding day in Nathaniel Hawthorne escorted his new wife Sophia to their first home the Old Manse in Concord Massachusetts There enriched by friendships with Thoreau and Emerson he

  • Title: Hawthorne in Concord
  • Author: Philip McFarland
  • ISBN: 9780802142054
  • Page: 206
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Hawthorne in Concord”

    1. Speaking as someone who got through The Scarlet Letter only because of Cliff Notes, I hadn't given Nathaniel Hawthorne a thought since high school until I actually moved to Concord, Massachusetts, and got a job working as a guide in one of the houses where he lived. I read the book as a homework assignment--and loved it! Nathaniel was amazingly good looking, but very shy and a bit of a snob. ("Pride and Prejudice", anyone?) He didn't fall in love until he was in his 30s, and then fell hard and t [...]

    2. An absolutely great book absorbing and informative and just damned good. Makes me wish I had lived in Concord at the same time (although I suspect I would have had more in common with Bronson Alcott

    3. McFarland masterfully weaves together a narrative that enthralls. This fine book is so rich in little known details of daily interaction and personal correspondence among the various literary figures of Concord in the middle of the nineteenth century, Hawthorne being at the center. This time in our history and the people who lived in it shaped our present in ways that are lost to us, until McFarland shows us the pattern that was there all the time, if we had but looked to see it. Excellent read. [...]

    4. Loved this book. Can not believe how many people we know of in us history and us literature were associated with Hawthorne. If I can, in future I will write a more informed review. Can not encourage enough readers to devour this book. I am bummed I have finished it. Enjoy it!

    5. An excellent study of a complex member of the Concord genius cluster. Great job on this bio, very readable.

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