Russian Peasants and Soviet Power: A Study of Collectivization

This is an alt cover ed for ISBN 0393007529.The collectivization of the peasants in the USSR constituted a social upheaval of a totally unprecedented nature It was one of the most remarkable events of the present century and it has a history as long as that of Soviet power itself The idea of a collectivized agriculture, much favoured by the leadership after the revolutThis is an alt cover ed for ISBN 0393007529.The collectivization of the peasants in the USSR constituted a social upheaval of a totally unprecedented nature It was one of the most remarkable events of the present century and it has a history as long as that of Soviet power itself The idea of a collectivized agriculture, much favoured by the leadership after the revolution, had been left in abeyance during the NEP period Interest in the idea, and in the collective movement, revived at the time of the grain crisis at the beginning of 1928 It was during this crisis that collectivization of the peasantry and the creation of a powerful kolkhoz and sovkhoz sector began to be taken seriously as a means of solving, at one and the same time, both the formidable problem of grain and the whole accursed problem of relations between the Soviet authorities and the peasants.
Russian Peasants and Soviet Power A Study of Collectivization This is an alt cover ed for ISBN The collectivization of the peasants in the USSR constituted a social upheaval of a totally unprecedented nature It was one of the most remarkable events of

  • Title: Russian Peasants and Soviet Power: A Study of Collectivization
  • Author: Moshe Lewin Irene Nove John Biggart Alec Nove
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 365
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Russian Peasants and Soviet Power: A Study of Collectivization”

    1. If nothing else, Moshe Lewin’s mammoth text Russian Peasants and Soviet Power is one of the most detailed and in-depth works concerning the pre-collectivization Russian peasantry and one of the most masterful interweavings of disparate sources in any field, a claim that becomes all the more impressive when one realizes that it was written over two and a half decades prior to the Soviet collapse and the opening of the archives. Despite the paucity of sources available to him, the author is able [...]

    2. This is comprehensively researched, but weirdly bloodless and almost anecdoteless until the final chapter on dekulakization. What were the experiences of peasants undergoing collectivization? What were the traumas? It's written from a top-down perspective, making it hard to say. If you're new to this period of Soviet history, read a less dry and academic book first.

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