What Really Matters: Searching for Wisdom in America

At the height of his career as a journalist, Tony Schwartz hit an unexpected wall Why did success suddenly feel so empty How could he add richer meaning to his everyday life What guides could he trust on the road to wisdom During the next five years his search for answers took him from a meditation retreat in the mountains of Utah to a biofeedback laboratory in KansaAt the height of his career as a journalist, Tony Schwartz hit an unexpected wall Why did success suddenly feel so empty How could he add richer meaning to his everyday life What guides could he trust on the road to wisdom During the next five years his search for answers took him from a meditation retreat in the mountains of Utah to a biofeedback laboratory in Kansas, from a peak performance workshop at a tennis academy in Florida to a right brain drawing course in Boston Blending the hunger of a seeker with a journalist s hard headed inquiry, he discovered the best teachers and techniques for inner development and identified the potential pitfalls and false gurus he met along the way What he found dramatically changed his life It may change yours as well.
What Really Matters Searching for Wisdom in America At the height of his career as a journalist Tony Schwartz hit an unexpected wall Why did success suddenly feel so empty How could he add richer meaning to his everyday life What guides could he trust

  • Title: What Really Matters: Searching for Wisdom in America
  • Author: Tony Schwartz
  • ISBN: 9780553374926
  • Page: 412
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “What Really Matters: Searching for Wisdom in America”

    1. I have owned this book for many years and have read this book many times; it's one of the few books I reread when I need a lift. I can open it to any page and start reading. As a result, my paperback copy is looking pretty mangy.What Really Matters introduced me to people that I went on to read more about, especially Ram Dass and Ken Wilber. I enjoyed the chapter on Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain because I owned Betty Edward's book and had already worked through her drawing exercises. Sc [...]

    2. This book was great. It's a comprehensive analysis of just about every way Americans go about finding more wisdom, inner peace, enlightenment, self-awareness, and an overall more full life. The author took 5 years to interview experts and practice multiple scientific, psychological, religious, philosophical and even mystic disciplines in his own very personal search for more meaning in his life. The information he provides is extremely detailed and his analysis is right on the money. I've dog-ea [...]

    3. Schwartz gives a good overview of many different traditional and non-traditional spiritual paths all looked at even-handedly

    4. A great tour of many aspects of the human potential movement. It was written in 1995 and I wish there was an update or sequel.

    5. I was not expecting what I found in this book. I purchased it on a whim with no research into it at all. I was expecting a more Ben Franklin, American common sense, Apple Pie, type book. What I was pleasantly surprised to find was that it is actually a "New Age" type of book documenting the first forty years or so of the Human Potential Movement. Starting with Ram Dass and the Esalen Institute. The work is very autobiographical as Tony tries almost every form of meditation and self-improvement t [...]

    6. after I read this i was scheduled to move to a meditation retreat but a forest fire broke out and then a newspaper radiohead and i went to high school with the guy whose dad used to own the major world paper.

    7. Schwartz's interviews of some of America's leading figures of wisdom in the 20th century make a compelling subject for a book, and some of his content is first rate. The ideas about health in chapters 3-6 are particularly fascinating, and it's tragic they are not more widely applied in the mainstream. In general, the book opened my mind to many thinkers and traditions that I might have otherwise overlooked. For example, I haven't been able to appreciate Ken Wilber--the image of his giant head on [...]

    8. This book is not terrible, but will be least disappointing when viewed simply as a heavily-annotated bibliography. Too anecdotal to make a good encyclopedia but too detached for an interesting personal narrative, and with prose itself overall so painfully boring as each new personality critique with personal biography becomes more facile and exhaustive than the one before, so that I found myself skipping through the book just to get pointers for further reading, _What Really Matters_ could have [...]

    9. I spent all last Sunday afternoon reading this book. It’s an older book, with a copyright in the 90’s, so some of it comes across as a bit dated. I grimaced here and there, reading about some of the “wisdom” Schwartz sought, using the power of brain waves, for example, acts I’ve always tended to regard as hocus-pocus mumbo jumbo. I carried away a lot of positive scientific evidence for meditation; I will seek more information about that. I also learned that one study found 75% of peopl [...]

    10. Nat Kuhn recommended this book during a long car ride when he drove me from Dad’s beach house to the Option Institute in MA/CT in the fall of 2003. I’d mentioned that a new women’s reading group was looking for books that we could read and discuss a chapter at a time, and I chose this one from among his suggestions. Its a survey of the available “paths to wisdom"in the America of the 1980s and 1990s, written by a successful journalist who was finding life empty and meaningless. I gave a [...]

    11. I read this in 1999--a 'travelogue' through America, with the author interviewing major players of spiritual faiths. It was this book that introduced me to Ken Wilbur, a philosopher/psychologist from Boulder. He is deep "credited with developing a unified field theory of consciousness—a synthesis and interpretation of the world's great psychological, philosophical, and spiritual traditions." His books are heavy reading. I have yet to finish a book of his. Check him out atinegralinstitute/.

    12. I have read carefully only the parts that were interesting for me, as I'm not keen in some lateral thinking, tennis of yoga, but the author made a really good job in researching and the part about the psychotherapy are illuminating. Ho letto attentamente solo le parti che mi interessavano, anche perché non vado matta per certe specie di pensiero laterale, tennis o yoga, a parte questo l'autore ha svolto un minuzioso lavoro di ricerca e la parte sulla psicoterapia é stata illuminante.

    13. A wonderful chronicle of important consciousness research up to the date of publication.Schwartz, a bit of a skeptic, used himself as his own research subject. An entertaining and informative read. Especially helpful for those who have little grounding in the human potential movement. It will answer many of your questions.

    14. One person's exploration to find what really matters. It was a life changing event for him and took him 4 years. He found inspiration in a variety of ways, which was, to me, a validation that the Almighty has methods for helping everyone, including those who have no belief in the Almighty.

    15. The author take the reader on an exciting road trip to meet various people and their belief systems and sources of wisdom.

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