Out of the Shelter

Timothy Young s earliest memories are of war, of the ritual retreat to a neighbor sbomb shelter with searchlights soaring overhead He grows to adolescence in postwar England, a land of ration coupons, sacrifice, and vaguely perceived dissatisfactions But Timothy s sister, Kath, has escaped all this She works for the United States Army in Germany, with plenty to eat andTimothy Young s earliest memories are of war, of the ritual retreat to a neighbor sbomb shelter with searchlights soaring overhead He grows to adolescence in postwar England, a land of ration coupons, sacrifice, and vaguely perceived dissatisfactions But Timothy s sister, Kath, has escaped all this She works for the United States Army in Germany, with plenty to eat and access to things most English people only dream about When Timothy goes to spend his summer holiday with Kath in Heidelberg, he leaves behind the boredom and grayness of London and discovers a world of color and flash fancy cars, an incredibly well stocked supermarket, glamourous parties and experiences a way of life that will change him forever.
Out of the Shelter Timothy Young s earliest memories are of war of the ritual retreat to a neighbor sbomb shelter with searchlights soaring overhead He grows to adolescence in postwar England a land of ration coupons

  • Title: Out of the Shelter
  • Author: David Lodge
  • ISBN: 9780140122794
  • Page: 402
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Out of the Shelter”

    1. A coming of age story of teenage boy, Timothy, in the post war years. Having grown up in an austere environment with rationing still gripping the country, he is invited to spend a couple of weeks in Heidelberg by his sister, Kate, who works for the American army. The holiday is an eye-opener and culture shock for Tim as he enters a colourful world where the word 'rationing' is unknown - except to the Germans. Life for Kate is one big party - although there are darker undercurrents and hints of t [...]

    2. Who could have wondered that once Davide Lodge wrote a novel like this?We have no visiting professors here neither Catholic couples coping with unwanted pregnancies, but a surprising half self-biographical story about a British teenager named Timothy visiting an Americanised Heidelberg in the early 1950s.Coming from the grey, depressing/depressed and starvation obsessed Britain of post World War II, young Timothy Young (sic!) experiences a stunning blowout of food, goods of all sorts and, yes, h [...]

    3. Peut-être mon Lodge favori même si on s'écarte de l'humour habituel de l'auteur. Dans ce roman d'apprentissage qui évite les gros sabots, le personnage va trouver sa voie entre la gravité excessive, qui empêche d'avancer, représentée par ses parents et par l'Angleterre, et la légèreté excessive, incarnée par sa soeur et les USA (puisqu'elle est partie travailler dans une base militaire américaine). La scène finale,où le narrateur voit se surimposer à l'image de sa jeune épouse q [...]

    4. This is an early David Lodge novel, and now one of my favorites. It relates the coming of age of Timothy Young, first as a child during the Blitz, and later as an adolescence in the years of scarcity in London after WWII. Timothy eyes are opened to the greater world when, at 16, he travels to Heidelberg, where his sister works in the American reconstruction effort. The Americans do not come off well. Much like the British in India and embassy folk everywhere, they are overpaid and pampered, and [...]

    5. Out of Shelter is my favorite of Lodge's works. The story has all of the characteristics of a great read. It begins with tragedy and moves through a boy's life to adulthood. It then culminates in with a great adventure. As with many of Lodge's works, Out of Shelter touches on the English Catholic themes and growing up in post-war England.

    6. I thought of my father a great deal as I read this early David Lodge novel. Set largely in post-war Germany among an American military set, this tender coming-of-age story has a strong air of the autobiographical and it lent some flavor to my dad's tales of being stationed in Germany in the early 1960s. It was great to get another version of the paternal narrative but with Lodge's voice; defamiliarizing the story has given it dimension, has made me think about the various players in that arena a [...]

    7. In 1951, 16 year-old Timothy, the very embodiment of repressed Catholic adolescence, visits his sister in occupied Germany. She is working for the American army, and is able to introduce him to a lifestyle of hedonism that is a far cry from the rationing still in place back home. Timothy bumbles along in this mystifying new world, looking up women’s skirts, consuming ice cream sodas on an industrial scale, and managing to get himself locked in the cupboard in a women-only hostel. Such events c [...]

    8. This was a real treat - thoroughly enjoyable from beginning to end. David Lodge's novels always combine rich entertainment and real substance. Out of the Shelter is a Bildungsroman of sorts, following the transformative experiences of Timothy from young childhood in South London during the Blitz through his coming of age on a trip to visit his older sister Kate in Heidelberg in the early 1950s. Kate has been working for the US army since the war, and has already left the shelter of her family an [...]

    9. I'm a sucker for a nice coming of age story, and in some ways, while this book doesn't have all that much to it, I felt it was a bit of an achievement for Lodge. His sharp eye for detail and tracking emotion is definitely here, yet instead of it being presented from the perspective of a middle aged man, we are seeing the world through loveable sixteen year old Timothy, who visits his erstwhile sister in loose Germany as WW2 draws to a close. There were plot twists I didn't really follow and perh [...]

    10. Coming of age story about an intelligent, gentle teenage boy who lives in London and survived WWII there. He goes on holiday to heidelberg, germany to visit his sister. The trip expands his growth and perspective.The writer based this novel on his similar experiences, and I liked how he showed the different viewpoints people had at the time about the war and Nazis, and religion. And how we see it through the protagnist's eyes; he tries to be a good person, but since he's curious some things he w [...]

    11. Me ha encantado desde la primera p��gina. El estilo de David Lodge es impecable, entra��able y directo. Los personajes quedan perfectamente definidos sin apenas descripci��n. Para m�� ha sido una revelaci��n sobre un tema del que no conoc��a pr��cticamente nada (la interacci��n entre americanos, alemanes e ingleses tras la Segunda Guerra Mundial) a trav��s del personaje de Timothy, cuando viaja a Heidelberg a visitar a su hermana Kath. Absolutamente recomendab [...]

    12. While I loved the young Timothy, child of the blitz and catholic boyhood, I didn't love the novel as much as some of Lodge's other works. The backdrop of London during the blitz and Heidelberg after the war were fascinating, but the coming of age story didn't quite ring true for me.

    13. I hated this book. I didn't like the themes, and while I'm absolutely not prudish (look at some of the other books on my shelves :p) I thought this one was just icky at times. Wouldnt recommend it to anyone!

    14. Semi-autobiographical 'coming of age' by David Lodge - make a point of reading his explanation at the back of how his publishers made him cut out 25% from his original MSS and how the 'new' computer technology ruined the first attempt (nothing really changes)

    15. it is quite interesting when you actually live in Heidelberg to read the story - still I found it a bit too funny written in the beginning, and I stoped after having reached the middle as it was getting a bit boring.

    16. I thought this book was rich all over: the passing of time of society tangled into the life of a kid. Solid imagery as is usual in Lodge's other books, and many characters merging in the different currents of the story. I saw a bit of myself in both sides of the story.

    17. An interesting take on growing up and an honest look at how the consumer society took off in the western world.

    18. Entertaining and informative coming of age story. A very good account of a world in transition post World War 2.I enjoy David Lodge's writing.

    19. Not an academic spoof like _Nice Work_ or _Small World_, but really fun: about a young British kid who lives through the war and then travels to Germany in 1951. Funny and wise.

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