Empires of the Sand: The Struggle for Mastery in the Middle East, 1789-1923

Empires of the Sand offers a bold and comprehensive reinterpretation of the struggle for mastery in the Middle East during the long nineteenth century 1789 1923 This book denies primacy to Western imperialism in the restructuring of the region and attributes equal responsibility to regional powers Rejecting the view of modern Middle Eastern history as an offshoot of glEmpires of the Sand offers a bold and comprehensive reinterpretation of the struggle for mastery in the Middle East during the long nineteenth century 1789 1923 This book denies primacy to Western imperialism in the restructuring of the region and attributes equal responsibility to regional powers Rejecting the view of modern Middle Eastern history as an offshoot of global power politics, the authors argue that the main impetus for the developments of this momentous period came from the local actors.Ottoman and Western imperial powers alike are implicated in a delicate balancing act of manipulation and intrigue in which they sought to exploit regional and world affairs to their greatest advantage Backed by a wealth of archival sources, the authors refute the standard belief that Europe was responsible for the destruction of the Ottoman Empire and the region s political unity Instead, they show how the Hashemites played a decisive role in shaping present Middle Eastern boundaries and in hastening the collapse of Ottoman rule Similarly, local states and regimes had few qualms about seeking support and protection from the infidel powers they had vilified whenever their interests so required.Karsh and Karsh see a pattern of pragmatic cooperation and conflict between the Middle East and the West during the past two centuries, rather than a clash of civilizations Such a vision affords daringly new ways of viewing the Middle East s past as well as its volatile present.
Empires of the Sand The Struggle for Mastery in the Middle East Empires of the Sand offers a bold and comprehensive reinterpretation of the struggle for mastery in the Middle East during the long nineteenth century This book denies primacy to Western imp

  • Title: Empires of the Sand: The Struggle for Mastery in the Middle East, 1789-1923
  • Author: Efraim Karsh
  • ISBN: 9780674005419
  • Page: 222
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Empires of the Sand: The Struggle for Mastery in the Middle East, 1789-1923”

    1. I bought this book in 2002 and put it down after 50 pages. Now after 11 years I gave it a new chance. What is positive about the book is that the Karsh couple seem to have done a good job researching many archives and working their way through a number of secondary sources (French, British, Arabic and Turkish studies).The book gave me the impression of being 2 Books put together into one.The book starts with Napoleons campaign to Egypt and the Ottoman Empire's reaction and Egyptian's Muhammad Al [...]

    2. Very intriguing. I was entranced by the narrative sewn together by this duo, and I learned a great deal from my reading of it. I think the Karshes lean a little too far in the opposite direction from the mainstream, but that is not necessarily a bad thing, it expands horizons even when it fails. The responses that the book has received are quite weak, which makes me think they are on to something. One thing is for sure, the tendency for people of the Middle East to blame outside factors for thei [...]

    3. Even if one does not accept the central premise that the current makeup of the Near East is largely a result of local political and "national" forces rather than the result of Western imposition, it is an excellent discussion of the many other factors that also contributed the map as it currently exists. At the its best it is an excellent discussion of how the West largely created the map largely in response to the will of those in power in the region.

    4. There's an interesting premise behind this book, and one that cannot be wholly discarded. It's in an episodal format, rather than a single narrative, but I feel that this was the best way to present the information: piece by piece, as it related to the subjects.

    5. Very selective when it comes to using primary resources. At fist it seems like a great book with new ideas but unfotunatly for someone how knows a lot about the Middle East it does not bring anything new. For new readers about the ME do not start with this book.

    6. I highly recommend reading this one. An in-depth study on the Ottoman Empire and its dissolutoin to the states we have now. A bit high level in many areas, but overall a very good read.

    7. I wish that the author dropped the first section of the book and renamed the book The fall of the Ottoman Empire and the Hashemite Empire,because that was focus of the book.

    8. The premise of this book shouldn't be controversial. The rulers of the Middle East were just as greedy as the Western Powers. The desire for power and riches is universal across the world.

    9. Middle Easterners are responsible for their own fate. They created their own modern existence. "Western Guilt" is not a historical reality.

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