What Sport Tells Us About Life: Bradman's Average, Zidane's Kiss And Other Sporting Lessons. Ed Smith

There is a huge category of sports fan people who love a bloody good argument Sport makes them think, engage and argue Given that people already take sport so very seriously, and at such an intense level of enquiry, then Ed Smith concludes we should draw out some of sport s intellectual lessons and practical uses What Sport Teaches Us About Life gives us a rare glimpseThere is a huge category of sports fan people who love a bloody good argument Sport makes them think, engage and argue Given that people already take sport so very seriously, and at such an intense level of enquiry, then Ed Smith concludes we should draw out some of sport s intellectual lessons and practical usesWhat Sport Teaches Us About Life gives us a rare glimpse into the world of sport as seen from an extraordinarily keen, and closely involved observer In one chapter Smith extols the virtues of amateurism in today s professional world in another he explains why there ll never be another sportsman as dominant as Don Bradman He unearths the hidden dimensions of England s 2005 Ashes win, examines the impact of the free market on cricket and football, argues that cheating is not always as clear cut as it might seem.
What Sport Tells Us About Life Bradman s Average Zidane s Kiss And Other Sporting Lessons Ed Smith There is a huge category of sports fan people who love a bloody good argument Sport makes them think engage and argue Given that people already take sport so very seriously and at such an intense le

  • Title: What Sport Tells Us About Life: Bradman's Average, Zidane's Kiss And Other Sporting Lessons. Ed Smith
  • Author: Ed Smith
  • ISBN: 9780670917228
  • Page: 416
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “What Sport Tells Us About Life: Bradman's Average, Zidane's Kiss And Other Sporting Lessons. Ed Smith”

    1. Great book which takes a light look at sporting anomalies and why they happen. The author's strong grasp of statistics, sporting history and life-skills of pro sportsmen gives him an unique insight into conundrums.I like a lot of his writing - but you need a good vocabulary and an ability to grasp long sentence constructions and complex concepts. It's not a "light read" at bedtime.Recommend

    2. This being my very first book by Ed Smith, i didnt know exactly what to expect. I had read a few articles by him related to cricket and found them a lot less shallow and well thought through than the regular i-will-tell-you-what-i-saw kind of article. Also, Ed Smith came highly recommended by my friend Vishy, and he being quite a discerning reader, I did have high expectations. I was not disappointed. The breadth of topics ranged from the classic discussion points about talent v/s practice to th [...]

    3. One of the things interesting about sport and life as far as conversation and opinion goes (not necessarily the same event) is the amount of polarisation that goes on, art and sport or art and education being opposites for instance, or that sport is trivial and other pursuits are more worthy and serious. Sometimes there's a class basis to this kind of discussion, even regarding what sports you're supposed to like, or play, or watch.For me, a genuine interest in sport has enabled connection with [...]

    4. A book by an English professional cricket player is a collection of essays on sports' lessons for life. Some are quite insightful, and Smith is both well-read and knows a decent amount about other sports, particularly baseball. That said, the essay for me that would have been the best--whether capitalism is good for sports--was completely off the mark, missing the point that European soccer is pure capitalism, leading to amazing club teams that often hemorrhage money while American sports, parti [...]

    5. I'd give this 3.5 stars if I could, but on this scale I believe in rounding up. Sometimes the top-heavy cricket stories, followed by rugby stories in second place, felt a bit relentless when there are so many sports to choose from. However, I check this feeling and decide I'm being harsh; to have a professional sportsman that can write - and express his own thoughts - so well is a rarity! Plus, these are sports I tend to not to watch often (baseball gets many mentions too) so it was an interesti [...]

    6. Without wanting to damn with faint praise, it is a really interesting book. Sport is ultimately all about having fun, but Ed Smith adds an analytical and intellectual approach to the meaning of sport which, grafted onto his own experiences as an international sportsman, casts some events in a totally new light. I love books about sport that also make you think, and this is almost up there with Simon Barnes' book for quality.

    7. It was never anything other than an effortless pleasure to turn each page. You obviously have to love sport, and cricket in particular, but Smith has an easy and sincere style which is greatly helped by Smith being a current sportsman, whose been at the top of his game, and who writes his own words. Some of the philosophical stuff tried a little too hard to be profound, but that's easily forgiven and this is a thoroughly recommended read to anyone with a passing interest in sport.

    8. Very good book in so much detail it appealed a lot to me. Sometimes it is hard to understand but never the less so good. This book is great for other reasons like if you find a chapter hard or boring you can skip it! All you have to read is the intro and the chapters that appeal to you.

    9. Extremely insightful and thought provoking. Very readable chapters on a number of aspects of why we love sport so much. Whether it's talent, luck, cheating or history Smith has a way of explaining the importance of different qualities that combine to make successful sportmen or sportswomen tick.

    10. I'm in the middle of a very good run of sports books at the moment. Illuminating and entertaining from someone who was also good enough to play for England. Shove it in the Christmas stocking of any thinking sports fan.

    11. The early chapters were mostly pop psychology - and really didn't say much at all. A couple of the later chapters were fairly interesting - especially the chapter on his Welsh roots. Overall, it was all a bit random and didn't really seem to reflect the statement on the front of the book.

    12. The book begins well but drags you later on.A cricket fan might love the book but for the rest, it's very mediocre.

    13. One of the best books about Sport and Life. You do not have to be interested in sport to enjoy this.

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