Curse of The Narrows

Before Hiroshima, there was Halifax In 1917 the busy Canadian port was crowded with ships leaving for war torn Europe On December 6, two of them, the Mont Blanc and the Imo, collided in the hard to navigate Narrows of the harbor Within minutes, the Mont Blanc, ablaze, grounded against the city s docks The explosion that followed would devastate the city and shock the wBefore Hiroshima, there was Halifax In 1917 the busy Canadian port was crowded with ships leaving for war torn Europe On December 6, two of them, the Mont Blanc and the Imo, collided in the hard to navigate Narrows of the harbor Within minutes, the Mont Blanc, ablaze, grounded against the city s docks The explosion that followed would devastate the city and shock the world Set against the background of World War I, Curse of the Narrows is the first major account of the world s largest pre atomic explosion that set in motion a remarkable relief effort originating from Boston.
Curse of The Narrows Before Hiroshima there was Halifax In the busy Canadian port was crowded with ships leaving for war torn Europe On December two of them the Mont Blanc and the Imo collided in the hard to na

  • Title: Curse of The Narrows
  • Author: Laura M. MacDonald
  • ISBN: 9780802715104
  • Page: 411
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Curse of The Narrows”

    1. I have some issues with the book but I have to say that MacDonald has crafted a tidy account of what has to be the biggest disaster in Canadian history. Without belaboring the obvious and summarizing the book, I will merely state that she starts at the beginning and carries on to way past the end of the disasterd what a disaster! More than 2000 killed and 6000 wounded in the largest man-made explosion to predate the atom bomb. There is much that is gruesome in these pages, and no end of heartbre [...]

    2. I had never heard of the Halifax disaster. After reading this book I can't imagine why. This is an event of catastrophic consequence. To imagine the power of 2,925 tons of TNT exploding. the results of which are unimaginable to anyone that was not there. But this author does a amazing job of putting you there!!! This book was incredible. The Halifax disaster is truly a tragic yet amazing event. No matter what you like to read. this book should be good to anyone and everyone. Plus I noticed most [...]

    3. MacDonald describes how the tragedy occurred, and what different spectators saw around them as the Imo careened into the Mount Blanc. Today, the whole world watches tragedies like this from every angle (and aerial too) on TV. It took 90 years after the fact to have a definitive work on the Halifax explosion. In our media age, as Katrina occurred, millions of published words, photos, videos and accounts documented it.While information has been revolutionized since then, human nature thankfully ha [...]

    4. Breathetakingly written account of the Dec. 6th, 1917 collision in Halifax Harbour of the French ship carrying high explosives and munitions that was waiting to join a convoy to cross the Atlantic. The Mont Blanc was carrying the highly volital to shock picric acid, TNT, Benzol, monochlorobenzal and munitions. She was struck by a Belgium Relief ship the Imo who was light and had limited capacity to maneuver as her props were half out of the water.The explosion ripped through the earth at 13,320 [...]

    5. Seems like a good introduction to the event (which I was totally unaware of) although it deals pretty superficially with the cause of the explosion itself. Covers some interesting details of such a catastrophe that you wouldn't have predicted. Like the problem of family pets eating human remains left in the rubble. Or that no churches except one held services for the first week because all the clergymen were too busy giving last rites or presiding over funerals.Oh oh! Also, the recollections of [...]

    6. Each December the people of Boston gather to witness the annual lighting of the Christmas tree. Some of them probably do not know why the people of Halifax send a tree every year or even that it is a gift from Nova Scotia. No one needs to know the story behind a tree to admire its beauty. But the people of Halifax know where it comes from and they remember the story.The above is not actually the blurb for the book; it's just a quick introductory paragraph, but I found it somehow more affecting t [...]

    7. Let's face it, I enjoy a good disaster book. And this was one disaster I had never heard of. I've never been to Halifax. But I guess I'm half-Canadian.This was one of the best. Well researched, possibly a bit graphic. But this was like a perfect storm of chain reactions - a disaster in the harbor, causes a tsunami, causes a blizzard. The explosion in the harbor should have been enough. MacDonald goes in to vivid detail of how the explosion impacted the surrounding area. Then, those who survived [...]

    8. A gripping, well-written account of a tragic disaster that is too little known. How many of us Canadians grew up thinking that the First World War just happened in Europe? More Canadians died on the 'home front" in Halifax than during the 103 bombing raids on England.

    9. Book DescriptionBefore Hiroshima, there was Halifax. In 1917 the busy Canadian port was crowded with ships leaving for war-torn Europe. On December 6, two of them, the Mont Blanc and the Imo, collided in the hard-to-navigate Narrows of the harbor. Within minutes, the Mont Blanc, ablaze, grounded against the city's docks. The explosion that followed would devastate the city and shock the world. Set against the background of World War I, Curse of the Narrows is the first major account of the world [...]

    10. Each December the people of Boston gather to witness the annual lighting of the Christmas tree. Some of them probably do not know why the people of Halifax send a tree every year or even that it is a gift from Nova Scotia. No one needs to know the story behind a tree to admire its beauty. But the people of Halifax know where it comes from and they remember the story.Most of us growing up in Canada around my age demographic, will remember the Canadian Heritage Minutes. They are such a beloved, no [...]

    11. It's a little unsettling to me that prior to reading Curse of the Narrows I had never heard of the explosion that caused so much devastation in Halifax, Nova Scotia on December 6, 1917. When the munitions ship, Mont Blanc, collided with the Belgian Relief vessel, Imo, on that fateful day none of the inhabitants in Richmond could have predicted the loss that their town would incur. I have to admit that at the outset of this book I was struggling to comprehend what was occurring as much of the lan [...]

    12. Curse of the Narrows relives the horror of the 1917 Halifax maritime disaster that nearly wipe the port and its inhabitants of the map. I am ashamed I had never heard of this piece of history the devastation, loss of life and suffering caused by it is truly of biblical proportions.The events are told by the those who lived through the horror by the stitching together of numerous first hand accounts, as well as some poetic license. The author also does a good job of putting the disaster in the co [...]

    13. On December 6, 1917, the most powerful human created non-nuclear explosion occurred in Halifax Harbor, Nova Scotia. The explosion occurred when a French munitions ship, the Mont Blanc, entering Halifax Harbor collided with a ship carrying relief supplies for Belgium, the Imo, which was sailing out of the harbor. The Mont Blanc was literally a floating bomb carrying TNT, gun cotton, and picric acid, all high explosives that were capable of simultaneous detonation. With the collision, benzol store [...]

    14. I had never heard of the Halifax disaster before, and even going into this book, I had no sense of the unparalleled destruction it caused. The explosion was massive, bigger than any explosion before it. The description of the damage it caused is now permanently etched into my mind. The physics of the explosion alone are mind-boggling - huge volumes of ocean water vaporizing, people being thrown a mile away from the air pressure, window shattering, buildings collapsing, etc. This book gives you p [...]

    15. This was a fascinating book. Each chapter focuses on some aspect of the Halifax Explosion of 1917, organized in loosely chronological orders. Starts with setting the political, economic and military context of Halifax leading up to and during WWI and the principal parties involved. The events of the fateful morning, reconstructed from eyewitness accounts and testimony, are detailed early in the book. The main part of the book is an account, weaving local history with many personal narratives of [...]

    16. In 1917, there was an explosion in Halifax, Nova Scotia's harbor. Two ships had collided, one of which was laden with munitions intended for use in World War I, and when it blew up, it was the largest man-made explosion in history until the Trinity atomic bomb tests. The explosion devastated Halifax and its neighboring communities. Laura MacDonald's book is a gripping read of the how the explosion occurred, what the effects were, and what the aftermath was.This book may be of particular interest [...]

    17. This isn't a true three-star rating, but I feel like two stars is too harsh. If anything, the amount of research deserves to be recognized!I'm a huge fan of narrative nonfiction, but this book didn't always work for me. The topic itself is fascinating, but the book was oddly paced and somewhat difficult to follow. The climax of the book, the ship collision and explosion, happens approximately 40 pages into the work, and the book itself is nearly 300 pages long. That's a lot of post-incident info [...]

    18. There have only been a handful of times in my life that i've not finished a book I've started. What could be a great account of a truly horrible, tragic event reads like a gorefest slasher flick screenplay. There is an over abundance of detail in describing the injuries people suffered in this explosion that took place in the bay of Halifax - only atomic bombs have caused greater explosions. But do I need 4 straight pages describing the awful details of what happens when people get glass in thei [...]

    19. 3.5 stars. I thought the book was really well written, but I don't think I particularly enjoy this Type of book. I found myself bored by some of the information, and wanting to linger on other topics. It's an important part of history that I didn't learn about in school and that's why I think this books are so essential, however, still- it didn't quite do it for me. First half was definitely better (for me) than the second.

    20. A gripping account of an event I never knew occured until I visited Halifax this past Oct. Well written but a bit drawn out.

    21. My motivation for reading this book is that my grandfather came to the US because of these events. Halifax was a key shipping port for WWI. A ship laden with explosives crashed into another boat, caught fire, and then, BOOOM! The explosion was so big that the harbor floor was exposed. Shockwaves and a tsunami leveled everything within a half mile. Over 1,600 people were killed instantly and 9,000 were injured. Every building within 1.5 miles was either completely destroyed or badly damaged.

    22. I had read Blizzard of Glass (about the 1907 Halifax explosion). That book provided a lot of info but was aimed at high school students. Curse of the Narrows provided much more detail and gave many side-stories of survivors and relief workers. This is a fascinating recount of a story most Americans know nothing about.As I side-note, I visited Halifax late in 2017. The Maritime Museum has many great displays on the explosion. I also visited the site where an 1,140 pound chunk of the Mont Blanc's [...]

    23. A comprehensive account of the December 6th, 2017, Halifax explosion which killed more than 2000 people and injured 6000 more. I must confess that I skimmed parts of it but did come away with a much clearer picture of this disaster, the largest man-made explosion until the atomic bomb. You can see a recreation here. newsinteractives.cbc/halifa

    24. Excellent historical detail engagingly written. I had no knowledge of this incident even though my grand-uncle had responded to Halifax's call for telegraph operators and arrived a few days after the explosion. A well-written and sympathetic account of the victims and first responders in a horrific tragedy that was preventable.

    25. I didn't really know much about the Halifax explosion at all before reading this book--all I knew was that every year, the people of Nova Scotia send the people of Boston a giant Christmas tree, which we put up on the Common to ooh and ahh over. This informative little piece of literature definitely will make me think next Christmas as I grumble about the traffic jam caused by the tree-lighting ceremony.In 1917, Halifax NS was a hub of military activity. Many American and Canadian ships leaving [...]

    26. This book had a lot of potential, but it fell short for me. I skimmed the last 75ish pages just to get it finished. The author packed in a lot of information, but it was not necessarily the information I wanted to read about, if that makes sense. Even the title of the book, 'Curse of the Narrows'. She mentions the curse at the beginning and that was the only time we heard about it. A friend pointed out the significance the telegrapher's action by staying behind and sending the message, Vince Col [...]

    27. I wanted to love this book way more than I did. Hell I even wanted to like it. The subject matter itself is so incredible that it should be easy to put together an engaging, page-turner of a book about it. Curse of the Narrows didn’t deliver for me. Aside from a decent opening to set up a backdrop for the story, the rest of the novel felt like reading a series of facts. There was little to no emotion. The story bounced around between so many different characters, sometimes from sentence to sen [...]

    28. On the morning of December 6, 1917, after exchanging a number of warning whistles, the Imo collided with the Mont Blanc in the narrows of the Halifax, Nova Scotia harbor. Unfortunately for the residents of Halifax, the Mont Blanc was fully loaded with munitions destined for the war in Europe. The Mont Blanc caught fire after the collision and when the crew determined that the fire was not controllable, they abandoned ship and rowed to the shore opposite from Halifax. Unmanned, the Mont Blanc ran [...]

    29. I admit it, I like disaster books. They're my guilty pleasure, I like reading about how far the human body and consciousness can be pressed before it breaks. It makes me value the comfortable spot I have here in mid Michigan, away from hurricanes and tsunamis and wars. It makes me less likely to complain about things like the polar vortex and our seemingly endless winter. So I guess you could say I'm a connoisseur of this type of nonfiction, and I have to say, Laura MacDonald's book on the Mont [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *