Exoplanets: Diamond Worlds, Super Earths, Pulsar Planets, and the New Search for Life beyond Our Solar System

The past few years have seen an incredible explosion in our knowledge of the universe Since its 2009 launch, the Kepler satellite has discovered than two thousand exoplanets, or planets outside of our solar system More and exoplanets are being discovered all the time, and even remarkable than the sheer number of exoplanets is their variety In Exoplanets,The past few years have seen an incredible explosion in our knowledge of the universe Since its 2009 launch, the Kepler satellite has discovered than two thousand exoplanets, or planets outside of our solar system More and exoplanets are being discovered all the time, and even remarkable than the sheer number of exoplanets is their variety In Exoplanets, astronomer Michael Summers and physicist James Trefil explore the unbelievable recent discoveries planets revolving around pulsars, planets made out of diamond, planets that are mostly water, and numerous rogue planets wandering through the emptiness of space This captivating book reveals the latest, greatest discoveries and argues that the incredible richness and complexity we are finding necessitates a change in the questions we ask and the mental paradigms we use In short, we have to change how we think about the universe and our place in it, because it is stranger and interesting than we can even begin to imagine.
Exoplanets Diamond Worlds Super Earths Pulsar Planets and the New Search for Life beyond Our Solar System The past few years have seen an incredible explosion in our knowledge of the universe Since its launch the Kepler satellite has discovered than two thousand exoplanets or planets outside of our

  • Title: Exoplanets: Diamond Worlds, Super Earths, Pulsar Planets, and the New Search for Life beyond Our Solar System
  • Author: Michael Summers James Trefil
  • ISBN: 9781588345943
  • Page: 320
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Exoplanets: Diamond Worlds, Super Earths, Pulsar Planets, and the New Search for Life beyond Our Solar System”

    1. I have mixed feelings about this book. It had some great ideas and a few great chapters, but everything kind of felt forced together and rushed, probably to capitalize on the recent earth-like exoplanets spied by TRAPPIST (there is no mention of these newly discovered worlds in this first edition).I found at least 4 grievous errors in the first few chapters alone, e.g Venus is our nearest planetary neighbor, not Mars. However, I found the chapters on rogue exoplanets and of ice and water very in [...]

    2. Exoplanets: Diamond Worlds, Super Earths, Pulsar Planets and the New Search for Life beyond our Solar System, by Michael Summers and James Trefil, is a look at the expanding science of exoplanet research. The authors look at a variety of planets that are posited to exist in our galaxy, and further elaborate on the innovations in telescopic technology allowing us to discover planets in orbit around distant stars. This is a difficult process, as currently planets in orbit around their stars are di [...]

    3. I am filled with genuine feelings about outer space and planets. There is so much I never considered about the universe and I am delighted that I decided to pick up this book. Definite recommendation!

    4. This should have been much better, but the authors spend a chapter belittling and ridiculing peers that they don't agree with. Very petty and unprofessional.

    5. A fun, brief overview of current scientific understandings of what kinds of worlds and life might exist out there.

    6. This book is very readable and pretty up to date (for a few minutes at least). The authors are scientists trying to write rather than writers talking about science. I think this shows primarily in the way they weight and shade their claims. They focus on mainstream headline sort of topics, but they put in disclaimers to keep themselves honest, sometimes even about relatively subtle distinctions.However, the book is more interested in entertainment than education. There is a lot of emphasis on th [...]

    7. This is a non-technical survey of exoplanet research. The authors write in an almost breezy, accessible style, telling us, first the basics of exoplanets, how they are detected, what the current state is, and then they go into a kind of tour guide to some example types of exoplanets. The book concludes with short chapters on the Drake Equation, the search for intelligence, and the Fermi Paradox.That’s a lot to cover in a little over 200 pages, so don’t expect too much depth on any one thing. [...]

    8. This is a generally fascinating book about what we know about planets beyond our solar system and the chances for life there. Now that we can look into other solar systems, we can find an array of planetary types that is far more diverse than we could ever guess. (In part because we guessed that other places would be like our solar system. Nope). There are Jupiter-sized planets up close to their stars. There are planets by pulsars (how is that possible?) Most interestingly, many - perhaps even a [...]

    9. A very thorough, but layperson accessible overview of this wonderful new subject.The book covers the whole subject in a Scientific American level writing. There are enough technical details to keep reading, while not getting too bogged down on the mechanics of the actual science.The historical parts about Kepler etc. are well written. The book shines with its explanation of water, rogue planets, and the Fermi paradox though.Water because we encounter it almost every day, but don't realize how di [...]

    10. I've been an astronomy buff since a very early age (true fact: I'm an astronomy graduate program dropout) and nothing hits my science-happy button harder than the discovery of new planets. This book starts by going into detail about all the methods astronomers use to find planets around other stars, and wraps up by analyzing the possibility of finding life on other worlds and what it might be like.The gem for me though was the middle section of the book, where chapters are dedicated to all the d [...]

    11. The book is a good introduction to the world of exoplanets for the general reader. The authors briefly touches on history of exoplanet search, detection mechanisms, and give us a tour of some of the exoplanets that Kepler space telescope has detected over the years e.g. 55 Cancri E, Kepler 186f etc. However, here is the key takeaway: even though we are looking for signature of life on the surface of earth like planets in the habitable zones, life might very well flourish in subsurface oceans of [...]

    12. As a reader not well versed in astronomy, I found Michael Summers and James Trefil's book to be quite a fascinating read - balancing a line between being informative, accessible and wonky enough to make you feel that you're going beyond the surface level. (The authors could have easily written a book twice as long, but this brief read readily captures a great deal).For many, their book provides a good introduction to many scientific concepts (ex. Fermi paradox) along with a brief history of our [...]

    13. A pretty good audiobook to listen to if you are interested in astronomy and space, like me, but you are not hardcore about the details of science. I just want the theories explained in layman's terms, which is basically what Michael Summers and James Trefil provide. Occasionally a little dry, but the last half of the book picked up with its discussion on the theories of extraterrestrial life. I learned a ton about where scientists are in determining theories and possible research paths and in ge [...]

    14. Fascinating stuff. More of a textbook than light-before-bed reading, but hey. I don't always choose the bedtime bookclub book, and I'm married to a science nerd. It did spark a few really interesting conversations and made me interested in finding out more about the solar system. I'll be on the look out for a book that lies somewhere between hardcore science and fluff, though. I'm sure there's one that's a little more digestible.

    15. I'm always looking for science for the layman, and this generally works, although occasionally it was a bit esoteric for me. Clearly they tried to make it work for non-scientists, and I do applaud that. What I found most interesting was the discussion of the demotion of Pluto. Clearly, in their opinions, a political decision and not the right one. Interesting stuff, although I would have appreciated a PDF with pictures.

    16. Interesting theoretical overview of exoplanets and the search for life outside our solar system. Written on laypersons level, I found it readable and easily understood. They make it quite clear that the book is presenting theories, hypothetical worlds based on current knowledge that may be more or less accurate. I found the discussion on the search for extraterrestrial life to be well reasoned. Recommend this work highly.

    17. Ugh! Not a fan. I got this as a Blind Date with a book from the library & I loved the tagline - “Did you hear about Pluto?” (And yes I read that in the voice of Barney Stinson.) I’ve also been on a non-fiction kick lately. Was prepped to like it but I didn’t. Nonfiction about Planets is apparently not my thing. :( Guess I got caught up in the sale.

    18. A great overview of our current knowledge of exoplanets and speculation on what some of them may be like. It also delved into the speculation of extraterrestrial life, it's possibilities and where and what to look for.

    19. While the authors could easily have written a book many times longer, they used the small space they had to communicate effectively their thesis: that what we find out in the universe is very unlikely to look anything at all like Earth.

    20. Enjoyable descriptive survey of possible exoplanets recently discovered, primarily thanks to the Kepler Probe.

    21. Immediate Review: A solid and informative foundationAs someone interested in the possibilities that space provides but does not have the hard scientific background, this book is a perfect fit. Authors Michael Summers and James Trefil have a wealth of experience and knowledge that they convey in an easy to understand format for those of us who lack that base knowledge.They also do a stellar job (no pun intended) of painting a picture dedicating several chapters to theoretical journeys of both rea [...]

    22. although it may be basic for other readers, its emphasis was on visual descriptions of the different kind of exoplanets found, which was exactly what i was looking for

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *