Poachers Pilgrimage: An Island Journey

The islands of the Outer Hebrides are home to some of the most remote and spectacular scenery in the world They host an astonishing range of mysterious structures stone circles, beehive dwellings, holy wells and temples from the Celtic era Over a twelve day pilgrimage, often in appalling conditions, Alastair McIntosh returns to the islands of his childhood and explorThe islands of the Outer Hebrides are home to some of the most remote and spectacular scenery in the world They host an astonishing range of mysterious structures stone circles, beehive dwellings, holy wells and temples from the Celtic era Over a twelve day pilgrimage, often in appalling conditions, Alastair McIntosh returns to the islands of his childhood and explores the meaning of these places Traversing moors and mountains, struggling through torrential rivers, he walks from the most southerly tip of Harris to the northerly Butt of Lewis The book is a walk through space and time, across a physical landscape and into a spiritual one As he battled with his own ability to endure some of the toughest terrain in Britain, he met with the healing power of the land and its communities This is a moving book, a powerful reflection not simply of this extraordinary place and its people met along the way, but of imaginative hope for humankind.
Poachers Pilgrimage An Island Journey The islands of the Outer Hebrides are home to some of the most remote and spectacular scenery in the world They host an astonishing range of mysterious structures stone circles beehive dwellings hol

  • Title: Poachers Pilgrimage: An Island Journey
  • Author: Alastair McIntosh
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 253
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • 1 thought on “Poachers Pilgrimage: An Island Journey”

    1. This is a book that is profoundly about place - McIntosh really knows how to evoke the spirit of Lewis and Harris, and the book feels embedded in the islands' culture. But as it develops it becomes much deeper, and richer. He weaves in discussions on theology and island spirituality, war and God, community and "life and love made manifest. The whole spiritual shebang!"I absolutely loved McIntosh's ability to embed all of this deep, profound thinking into an account of a twelve day walk across th [...]

    2. Alastair McIntosh seems to distill in these pages the "core" of indigenous knowing and listening. The concept (and way) of Imramma is central here, as a way of remembering our humanity as deeply rooted in place. The book maps a quest, and the authors pilgrimage across his native land is a profound act of questioning in and of itself, a kind of opening, and by the end of the book one is left with layered reflections and a sense of treading a path that goes both "back" and "forwards" at once. Inde [...]

    3. The book is Alastairs pilgrimage to Harris & Lewis, the place of his childhood. He spends two weeks in 2009 walking the length of the island. It sounds simple, but it isn't. He rediscovers and brings to life the ancient beliefs, the sidhe and more. He finds wells long lost and discusses peace, war, quarries the changes in life even in the Hebrides. Parts of the book are deeply moving, others are whistful evocations of times lost and deeds good and bad done. The book interweaves the story of [...]

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