Night by Elie Wiesel (Connect : A Literature/Social Studies Program)

Presents activities to accompany the reading of Night by Elie Wiesel For grades 8 12.Featured book is about a searing personal memoir of a boy who lived through the horrors of Auschwitz and Buchenwald, a witness to the evils of the Nazi regime.
Night by Elie Wiesel Connect A Literature Social Studies Program Presents activities to accompany the reading of Night by Elie Wiesel For grades Featured book is about a searing personal memoir of a boy who lived through the horrors of Auschwitz and Buchenwald

  • Title: Night by Elie Wiesel (Connect : A Literature/Social Studies Program)
  • Author: Sharon Flitterman-King David C. King Kathryn Riley
  • ISBN: 9781568011240
  • Page: 172
  • Format: Unknown Binding
  • 1 thought on “Night by Elie Wiesel (Connect : A Literature/Social Studies Program)”

    1. Written in plain language, this is the first of 21 books written by Elie Wiesel, who at 14 was removed from hid town of Sighet in Transylvania and with his entire family taken to Auschwitz, then to Buchenwald. Less than a hundred pages, it simply narrates, in first person, his history with his father from that time, through his father's death, to the arrival of the first American tanks that freed him on April, 1945.Learning what had happened to the Jewish people during WWII as a child was the fi [...]

    2. I had the privilege of hearing Elie Wiesel speak back in the 1980's when he came to my hometown. I was in high school then, approximately the age he was when he and his family and village were taken from their homes and sent to forced labor camps by the Nazi's. This book chronicles his story of coming of age during the most inhuman time in modern history. Told in a narrative voice that immediately draws me in, it relates unthinkable events in a matter of fact way that creates an indelible impres [...]

    3. Night is an autobiography about the author, Elie Wiesel's, life during the Holocaust. The book opens with Moshe the Beadle, a homeless Jewish man who has seen what the Germans are doing to the Jewish people. He tries to warn the Jewish citizens of Sighet, Hungary, but to no avail. The people believe Moshe is just a crazy old man who made up the tale of him being taken away. The Hungarian government is taken over by the Fascists and German armies in the spring of 1944. Strict laws are enforced on [...]

    4. Everyone should read this book. I wouldn't recommend it right before "Slaughterhouse Five," though, which was when I read it. The author relates his memoir of time spent in Nazi concentration camps. Everyone should confront this terrible horror sometime in their lives, but reading the two books in tandem can shake your hope for humanity. The cruelty and injustice are so monumental and monstrous.However, Elie survived. His being a teenager probably helped, although there were hundreds of thousand [...]

    5. Short book just over 100 pages but gripping all the way. It begs the question - How can we let happen again and again to many different groups of people the experiences so similar to that of the Jews? I wish I were younger again so I could take up the battle cry for human rights. How can we get so bent out of shape over climate change, which is not real, while humans are suffering at the hands of terrorists all over the world. I suppose I should share the truth that the only solution is Jesusa q [...]

    6. I really think should allow you to enter books even when you re-read them. So this isn't the exact copy I read but it was more of a placeholder for me so that I could account for this book. I read the original night by Elie Wiesel. It was a re-read for me. Apparently I've read it in high school, 2007, and 2009 (I'm going from past posts.) This makes time #4, and I read it for a Mother/Daughter book club I am in. Such a tragic story, yet told so straightforwardly and honestly. That's what makes [...]

    7. A slim but life changing volume - a must read for anyone interested in how human beings can survive inhumanity - told in stark, poetic, stirring honesty - riveting, harrowing, and unforgettable. Glad to know that this is on many middle school required reading lists.

    8. Wow. This book was so emotional and powerful. It is hard to read books like these where things like this actually did happen but i think it is important to really be able to hear their stories in hopes that things like this won't happen again. Great book i recommend it 10x's over.

    9. Awesome, amazing book that has SO much figurative language. Great way for teens to gain insight into another world they know nothing about.

    10. A slim volume of tremendous impact. It is a part of me now, and I believe I shall be carrying it with me for quite a long time.

    11. Elie Wiesel's objective for writing Night is to preserve the memory of the Jewish people and the struggles they endured because of the Holocaust. Wiesel's book is to serve as the memory of a dying generation, lest future generations forget the lessons of our past, turning a blind eye to the evil within this world. It is his greatest hope that every human should heed the moral imperative of "responsibility" in the face of such great injustice, such intolerable suffering (xv). Wiesel's story is a [...]

    12. I really enjoyed reading this book because it gave me some insights on what happened in the Holocaust from a first-person point-of-view. Night by Elie Wiesel captivated me in so many ways. There was drama and horror and so many other terrifying things. It pulled me in. I couldn't stop reading it. I fought to put it down and was upset when I finally managed to do so. All I wanted to do was keep hearing his stories, devastatingly painful and dramatic. All I wanted to do was keep getting pulled in [...]

    13. Night By Elie Wiesel, Dawn By Elie Wiesel Throughout the early 1940's, the Jews of the Shtetl in Sighet, Transylvania clung onto hope like it was gold. Everyday there was always something to be happy about. Children danced, mothers sang, and families gathered together to share stories. But in the Spring of 1944, everything went still, silent, and dark. Swept into this world was a young Elie Wiesel and his family. Elie presents his unbearably painful life in the Holocaust through Night. His remar [...]

    14. Night by Elie Wiesel to me was a great book and it was also very sad to read. The story is about a teenager named Elie and he went through a lot of the bad stuff that went on during the war. Elie describes how the Nazi made him and his family leave their comfortable home and moved them to concentration camp. The Nazis were very mean to Elie's family because he was not like them and the Germans wanted to kill all of the people that were not like them or were against them. Elie's family was put in [...]

    15. This book definitely is worth reading. It is such an emotional book and really makes you greatful for the life you have. This book is about a Jewish boy named Eliezer and what he went through during the Holocaust. Eliezer was only 12 when he was taken away from his home and sent to the concentration camps. His family and his self were shoved into tightly packed cattle cars. On their way to the camps he witnesses a women getting beat for screaming about the furnaces they were going to be put into [...]

    16. I thought that this book truly represented the atrocities committed in The Holocaust for what they were. Elie Wiesel's account of it made it much more personal and his effort to show the feelings of indignity were well represented. I found that to be extremely true in the scene where he saw his mother and little sister for the final time. When the SS commanded that they men should go one way and the women the other, it's hard to envision that this signified their last few moments before their de [...]

    17. This book was incredible but also a little scary. It got into details about the Holocaust that were terrible and hard to think about. Something's were downright horrible such as a boy killing his old father for a piece of bread. However, the author made the book all the more interesting by sharing, not just facts and details, but opinions and personal stories. It was amazing that the author had actually lived through this. Therefore, this book really opens your eyes and taught me a lot, while te [...]

    18. I had never read this before. Of course, I felt that I had, and that’s because it’s so iconic. This book has become part of the soul of the world we live in. It’s a marker of the most shadowy and evil part of the human psyche; we need to know that this exists, that these things are possible. Reading it is harrowing. Every page is an occasion for mourning – not just for the lives and futures thrown away, the histories discarded, but also for the slow torture that erodes the personhood of [...]

    19. Book review on NightNight depicts Elie Wiesel’s holocaust experience, and makes you appreciate every small thing most of us take for granted. Although it is a sad story, describing horrific events that happened during his time in the concentration camps, I never felt like I wanted to stop reading the book because of Elie’s talent and determination. Elie said that he wrote the book to ensure that people knew what happened, and that it would never be forgotten or repeated. I recommend this boo [...]

    20. Night shows the desperation of a man faced with impossible odds. Read in conjunction with Man's search for meaning, these two books show how one terrible circumstance can show the difference in how a man copes and how different he might be when he comes out the other side. While Night shows a mans utter desolation and the abandonment of his faith, the other shows that even in the darkest times, there is still hope. I would reccomend this book to read if you have even the passing interest in the [...]

    21. This is a book worth reading simply because of the incredible story which it tells. In few other pieces can one find such a complete and moving portrayal of the injustice which Jews faced at Auschwitz. Elie Wiesel was able to squeeze all of his experiences throughout the Holocaust into just 109 pages, so this book is definitely fast moving. However, it is still able to capture the smaller struggles and details that prisoners faced which makes this account much more moving. This is probably the m [...]

    22. I've been studying the antisemitism of the Christian church and connections to global events. This was recommended as background reading to understand Auschwitz from a first person accounting.Wiesel does a good job covering a heart-wrenching time in his life and I understand why the book is so short I'm sure it is hard to share those details However, that is the reason I didn't give more stars. I really wish he had written more to better record as evidence the atrocities of the holocaust.

    23. This book stirred up so many emotions as I read it. Anger, sorrow, grief, but mostly disbelief that human beings could ever treat another human being such utter brutality. My herat bled for this poor boy, only 15 years old, who did nothing to deserve what life dealt him except to be born the wrong ethnicity at the wrong time. This book should be read if for no other reason than to remind people of what has happened so that it can never happen again.

    24. I really liked this book because I love learning about the holocaust. It was very interesting to read about everything. It was very hard to look at all of the inhumanity that happened in the holocaust. I really liked how Elie put everything together in this book. It made it very easy to learn! This was a really good book and I will encourage other people that haven't read it, to read it. It also made it easier to understand by annotating in the book.

    25. This is the story that Elie Wiesel lived as a young Jewish man, written in a first person account. It is about a boy that has touched the face of evil present in humanity, the Holocaust, witnessing the death of friends and family. Gas chambers and mass killings. This is a stark account, unafraid to ask difficult questions like where was God, how inhumanity to man can reduce a starving man to trample over another to survive another day for a crust of moldy bread.Never again.

    26. "Wiesel has taken his own anguish and imaginatively metamorphosed it into art." I feel fortunate to have read this book, a translation by his wife. Wiesel was a teenager when he and his family were taken from their home in Sighet, Transylvania, to Auschwitz. His description of life is chilling, i.e the use of infants for target practice, the train car rides, the horror of evil. Only 120 pages long.

    27. I wish I could say I liked this book more than I did. I preferred "Unbroken" by Laura Hillenbrand which is also a biography but regarding the allies v Japanese side of the 2nd World war. I have always been interested to discover how some people confront death and atrocities but maintain the strength to overcome. This book was just plain depressing. Unbroken is amazing in that it uplifts the human spirit in the face of unbelievable suffering. How does one define such courage?

    28. Very powerful, moving story written by the man who experienced the terror of being a young Jew in the concentration camps. He states that one of the main goals of telling his story is to never forget - that the world will never forget - the horrors of what can happen when people don't have the courage to speak up and to fight against the violation of human rights. Very profound and moving.

    29. Heartbreaking and harrowing. Only a survivor of the holocaust could bring the reality of it to print so graphically and accurately. Only one who has won the Nobel Prize for Peace could endure so much tragedy in his own life and still give hope to others. Profound and brilliant and heart-wrenching prose.

    30. I thought it was very sad and interesting to read the survivors perspective on how they were treated and the harsh weather they had to survive and it taught me some new things about the concentration camps.

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