My Heartbeat

Ellen loves Link and James Her older brother and his best friend are the only company she ever wants She knows they fight, but she makes it a policy never to take sides She loves her brother, the math genius and track star She is totally, madly in love with James, his face full of long eyelashes and hidden smiles When you grow out of it, James teases her, you willEllen loves Link and James Her older brother and his best friend are the only company she ever wants She knows they fight, but she makes it a policy never to take sides She loves her brother, the math genius and track star She is totally, madly in love with James, his face full of long eyelashes and hidden smiles When you grow out of it, James teases her, you will break my heart Ellen knows she ll never outgrow it She ll always love James just the way she ll always love Link Then someone at school asks if Link and James might be in love with each other A simple question.Link refuses to discuss it James refuses to stay friends with a boy so full of secrets Ellen s parents want Link to keep his secrets to himself, but Ellen wants to know who her brother really is When is curiosity a betrayal And if James says he loves her, isn t that just another way of saying he still loves Link My Heartbeat is a fast, furious story in which a quirky triangle learns to change its shape and Ellen, at least, learns the limits of what you can ever know about whom you love.
My Heartbeat Ellen loves Link and James Her older brother and his best friend are the only company she ever wants She knows they fight but she makes it a policy never to take sides She loves her brother the math

  • Title: My Heartbeat
  • Author: Garret Weyr, also Freymann-Weyr
  • ISBN: 9780618141814
  • Page: 228
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “My Heartbeat”

    1. This is the story of an adolescent girl with a crush on a bisexual boy who might or might not be in a relationship with her brother, a near-genius who refuses to admit that he's gay.Only that summary makes My Heartbeat sound far more interesting than it actually is.

    2. This book is really, truly wonderful. The writing is unbelievably good, but it's difficult to put your finger on exactly why. I love the understanding of teenage love that it conveys--the feeling that you are saying so much, declaring your undying love with mere gestures and common phrases when really you are simply asking the boy of your dreams to pass the bread. Freymann-Weyr also captures silence as communication ever so perfectly: its contrasting power of conveying anger and hurt and its abi [...]

    3. The only reason I see for awarding My Heartbeat Printz Honor in 2003 is its ultra-liberal, non-judgmental approach to teen sexuality. The novel's premise is indeed edgy: 14-year old Ellen has only two friends - her older brother Link and his best friend Jason. Ellen has a bit of a crush on Jason, but no one acts on it until it is brought up to Ellen that the closeness between Jason and Link can only be explained by these two boys being a couple. When Ellen raises the question of her friends' hom [...]

    4. I never would have discovered this hidden gem if it weren't for my booktwin Martha reviewing it so glowingly a few years back. Not only had I not heard of Garret Freymann-Weyr before, but I'm pretty sure neither of its covers would have induced me to pick it up. Seriously, what in the world were they going for with this one? I justI have no idea. But I know they missed. And the pink one is sort of cute, but really not indicative at all of what's inside. So. The Printz Honor award, on the other h [...]

    5. Weird. I think this book is an excellent example of a fake-out conflict, much like _No Country for Old Men_. When you close the book, you think, "Huh?" until you look at the title, think back over what went on, and realize, "Oh, it was about THIS all along." I can't be more specific without giving away spoilers.I liked that the book dealt rationally and respectfully with the fluidity of teen sexuality; no one uses the word "bisexual" in this book, because slapping a label on it and walking away [...]

    6. Yes it's from the "Teen Lit" shelf! What are you gonna do about it?! That's the thing, teen lit is really good! This writer is amazing and the writing was like butta', and I wish I made up some turns of phrases that she used. The main character (14-yr-old girl, who esle?) is learning to SEE things. Not just to look, but to see, like an artist does, while struggling with her family who handles struggle and problems by not talking about it, but carefully arond it:"If I never develop the gift of cl [...]

    7. I absolutely loved this book. It has its faults; I really had no desire to read about privileged kids in NY, hear yet another preachy moment about the dangers of teen sex complete with pregnancy and AIDS, but I still absolutely loved this book. As a teen this is what I would have wanted to read without realizing it. I love the characters and they resonate with me. The main character is a girl who adores her brother and desperately wants to know him. Her family can't communicate, they are bad wit [...]

    8. I really did not like this book. First of all it was classist. Although the homophobia behind the action may be similar, paying off one's son is disgusting. The talk of Ivy league schools and other high-brow examples turned me off (especially when it was the bulk of the book).Secondly, what started out as the main story (the relationship between the boys) turned out to be non-important at the end. Thirdly, who in their right mind would really be okay with their sister dating someone they were in [...]

    9. Although this book was an award winner when it was first published in 2002, I didn't find it to be everything it was cracked up to be. The family in this novel are overeducated Manhattan snobs obsessed with their own intellectual pretensions, which makes them distinctly unlikable. Although this is an interesting look at how adolescent sexuality can be defined in many different ways, I couldn't get past the annoying characters, who were a bit too precious for my taste.

    10. I had higher expectations, I guess. It felt too short, like only the beginning of an idea. It was cute and well-written but I was waiting for a more intriguing plot to come out of it, and the plot never emerged for me. Okay, but not great in my opinion.

    11. The heck even is this book. I freaking LOVED IT.At first, I was like: "Wait, what? This author did not research for this whatsoever. Garret Weyr, also Freymann-Weyr is so not qualified to be an author." But now I'm like: "HOLY CRAP THIS IS AMAZING YOU ARE AN AMAZING WRITER KEEP WRITING I NEED MORE BOOKS BY YOU RIGHT NOW!"The way the chapters and scene breaks were finished were so deep and beautiful, and Jesus Christ, I wish I could write endings like that. My favorite finish to a chapter (though [...]

    12. I’ve never really liked YA even before I knew what “YA” really was. As a closeted teen who needed something to relate to I jumped on the chance on reading the very first “lgbt” book i found in my school library. My initial reaction to this book after finishing it was meh. The protagonist doesn’t really have much of a personality outside of her reaction to the love triangle between her, her gay brother, and their on again-off again lover and being a heroic champion for the lgbt. And e [...]

    13. This book has confused the hell out of me. I loved the characters, I loved the writing style. I loved how Ellen came into who she is at the very end. It was beautifully written, but not enough so to distract from the GLARINGLY UGLY FACT THAT JAMES AND ELLEN GET TOGETHER. I tried to really love this book. In it's beginnings when James and Link were sort of in love and Ellen has a lovely role as looking up to the both of them, I did. I wanted to know how that relationship would affect the family. [...]

    14. The thing about this book is I don't think I completely understood it. I like the concept, but it felt unpolished and unfinished. I know this was supposed to be a groundbreaking novel about discovering and exploring sexuality, but the heterosexual couple ended up together in the end and the supposed gay character was still afraid of the possibility of being gay. I for one disliked nearly every character in this book, for albeit completely different reasons. The dad for the dismissal of his clear [...]

    15. This is the first book I ever read due to specific interest in reading about a gay relationship. YA novels featuring teen boys tend to disappoint more often than not anyway, so it took me a while to choose one, wondering who I could trust not to make it gross and explicit. I chose this one after having adored two of her previous novels, and it turned out to be the perfect introduction. The focus is very much on the girl, and it skirts around the main issue just enough to create plausible deniabi [...]

    16. It should be hard to call a Printz nominee underrated, but this book is. Ellen is a high school freshman in love with her brother Link's best friend, James. It's never been a problem, until a friend at school asks if Link and James are a couple. Are they?James and Link and their parents have different answers to that question, and in the course of investigating what love is and should be, Ellen also attempts to find her own interests - her own heartbeat. I love love love this book and want every [...]

    17. A decent book. I found the premise to be more promising than the actual book, which is about the complicated emotions between a 14 year old girl, her older brother, and her brother's friend/long-standing crush. The text raises issues about love, loyalty, and learning to be true to yourself. It touches on bisexuality but never says the word, focusing more on the potentially gay brother, and his and his dad's complex emotions around what it means to be gay. It feel a little dated (written in 2002) [...]

    18. An utterly beguiling story on the questions of love: how do parents love their children? How do friends and siblings love each other? Are love and sex separate? Ellen, her brother Link, and his best friend James wrestle with the deepest and most complicated of emotions in this passionately realized novel. There are no villains and no unmixed emotions in this book. The writing is vivid, tender, limpidly clear.

    19. Ellen narrates the intricate and passionate story of her brother and his best friend. The question is whether they're gay or not, but what ends up happening is more about discovering family, unwritten laws, and what happens when you truly fall in love. Not because she's curious, careful, kind, and intense. But because she's let somebody else discover that about her and love her for it.

    20. I'm torn between wanting to give this book five stars, because I enjoyed it and read it in one sitting and found it to be very insightful and deep, and giving it one star, because I really, really, really hated the way it all turned out. It actually makes me angry. Three stars it is, I guess.

    21. My Heartbeat is written in a beautiful rich which is hard to explain but in a way that you will enjoy the whole story and see the richness of it. I enjoyed it and liked it a lot.

    22. The definition of heartwarming. The narrator gives off a "innocent and naïve yet slowly becoming aware" vibe that reminded me of scout finch from to kill a mockingbird.

    23. Sweet, deep without being heavy, raises questions but never preachy. Warm and comforting. This book is like music to me.

    24. My husband and I both liked this book (which is a rare event for a novel). It's about relationships between 3 NYC teens--a girl and her brother, and their male friend.

    25. With all of the accolades this received, I expected something more. Instead, I’m left feeling that it was unfinished and unsatisfying. It’s an honest exploration of young adult relationships, questioning sexuality, and first love, but the maturity level of the characters was way too high and more sophisticated than their ages merited. Yes, they’re extremely intelligent and highly-educated, but they’re still only 14, 16 and 17, so the navigation of their intertwined relationships required [...]

    26. I don't know why I had this on my shelf, but I must have heard of it somewhere and just picked it up on the basis of it being YA about a gay couple, except it's really not. It's about a girl whose brother is in love with his best friend, but refuses to admit it and says he's not gay. The friend is bi (though that word is never used) and eventually they get in a fight and stop being friends and the girl starts dating her brother's friend and there is a happy het ending and the brother himself doe [...]

    27. I"m not really sure how I feel about this to be honest. I liked it, but at the same time I felt conflicted about it. The premise was interesting, the middle was worthwhile, but I found the ending to be really dissatisfying. Perhaps it's because the book didn't work out the way that *I* wanted it to, or perhaps it really just wasn't as great as I had been hoping it would be. I'm not really sure, and that just annoys me a little bit.

    28. A quick read but I really wanted a happy ending. But I should have expected an unfinished ending anyways since the main character Ellen would always talk about unhappy endings anyways. I know it’s a bad allusion but it’s the only thing I thought about when I reached the end. Overall though, the story did engage me quite a lot.

    29. The concept of the book was great. It was a fast and easy read that held my attention but I think the ending was rushed. It seemed that two of the main characters were really exploring their relationship and then BOOM one is going to college and it's all over with. I would recommend the book to read for a young adult or maybe a young adult who is just getting into reading.

    30. Well-told sorry, with interesting points about how families communicate without communicating. I thought the main character was inconsistent--at times she didn't seem to be a realistic 14 year old and then at other times her thinking was very shallow and more like an adolescent.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *