Rule by Law: The Politics of Courts in Authoritarian Regimes

Scholars have generally assumed that courts in authoritarian states are pawns of their regimes, upholding the interests of governing elites and frustrating the efforts of their opponents As a result, nearly all studies in comparative judicial politics have focused on democratic and democratizing countries This volume brings together leading scholars in comparative judiciScholars have generally assumed that courts in authoritarian states are pawns of their regimes, upholding the interests of governing elites and frustrating the efforts of their opponents As a result, nearly all studies in comparative judicial politics have focused on democratic and democratizing countries This volume brings together leading scholars in comparative judicial politics to consider the causes and consequences of judicial empowerment in authoritarian states It demonstrates the wide range of governance tasks that courts perform, as well as the way in which courts can serve as critical sites of contention both among the ruling elite and between regimes and their citizens Drawing on empirical and theoretical insights from every major region of the world, this volume advances our understanding of judicial politics in authoritarian regimes.
Rule by Law The Politics of Courts in Authoritarian Regimes Scholars have generally assumed that courts in authoritarian states are pawns of their regimes upholding the interests of governing elites and frustrating the efforts of their opponents As a result

  • Title: Rule by Law: The Politics of Courts in Authoritarian Regimes
  • Author: Tom Ginsburg Tamir Moustafa
  • ISBN: 9780521720410
  • Page: 103
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Rule by Law: The Politics of Courts in Authoritarian Regimes”

    1. Conventional wisdom posits that courts in authoritarian regimes are simply the agents of the regime that lack independence and have no or minimal effect on political life. In this edited volume, Tom Ginsburg and Tamir Moustafa question this assumption and clearly show how and why courts matter in authoritarian regimes, and when and why regimes use courts. Edited volumes are a necessary evil of the discipline and oftentimes miss the mark with broad coverage and uneven themes. This volume, however [...]

    2. this book was originally recommended to me by a law school professor last semester, and I took time to read it last week. It was great and enlightening. Tom is absolutely an expert in authoritarian institutions. And this book collects 13 pieces by different authors who contribute ideas on the empowerment of judges in authoritarian states but from different perspectives. It will give people who are in this field useful suggestions on where to start.

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