Charlotte Sometimes

After Charlotte s first night at boarding school, the view from the window has changed and the girl in the next bed is not the girl who was there last night She is a stranger who calls Charlotte Clare and says she s her sister
Charlotte Sometimes After Charlotte s first night at boarding school the view from the window has changed and the girl in the next bed is not the girl who was there last night She is a stranger who calls Charlotte Clare

  • Title: Charlotte Sometimes
  • Author: Penelope Farmer
  • ISBN: 9780440700241
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Charlotte Sometimes”

    1. I will fully admit that I didn't discover this book in the traditional way.I have to admit to being a HUGE fan of the Cure. Yup. That's 80's quasi-gothy band, lead by Robert Smith. What can I say, I've always liked boys in makeup.One of my favorite songs by the Cure was always Charlotte Sometimes. I didn't have a clue that the song title was taken from a book, and that lines from the book were used in the song, as well as in the song The Empty World (She talked about the armies, that marched ins [...]

    2. Great fun! I’d have adored this when I was 9, 10, 11. My 10 year old self gives this 5 full stars. If I wasn’t so in touch with my 10 year old self, I might have given this only 4 stars, but it’s a completely delightful and smart story.It’s very suspenseful. It’s a fun meld of speculative fiction and historical fiction. Some aspects are ingenious. It was fun to try to figure out who one particular character was.Charlotte is a wonderful character, and I was particularly fond of Emily. T [...]

    3. I’ve recently read “Charlotte Sometimes” if for no other reason than to compare The Cure lyrics of their classic song Charlotte Sometimes to parts of the children’s fantasy. This is what I learned and it’s very interesting. ***Spoiler Alter***All the faces, All the voices blurChange to one face, Change to one voiceFirst sentence: By bedtime all the faces, the voices, had blurred for Charlotte to one face, one voice.Prepare yourself for bedSecond sentence: She prepared herself for bed . [...]

    4. Charlotte Makepeace starts at boarding school, I am guessing sometime in the 1950s. To add to her troubles of fitting in at a new school, she finds that she is changing places on alternate days with a girl who was alive during the first world war. Charlotte is confused and starts to wonder who she really is.This is a beautifully written book, very thoughtful and philosophical. I am very sorry not to have read it as a child, but hugely enjoyed reading it aloud to my daughter and discussing the st [...]

    5. I would have loved this book to bits when I was ten years old. It has so many good things in it - time travel, boarding school, some nice historical facts , possibly a few ghosts.l good fun! Reading it now though it is quite clearly a children's book (not YA) and as such is a little bland and lacking in real action. So for me this was an excellent children's book, well written and entertaining although of course also old fashioned.

    6. 4.5 STARSPenelope Farmer is an author who captured "the mysterious emotions of children, their uneasy relationships, and the sometimes terrifying awareness of their encompassing worlds." -- Ruth Hill Viguers, Horn Book."Charlotte Sometimes" is an intensely thoughtful, emotional story about Charlotte Makepeace, a young teenager attending boarding school in about 1950 in the English countryside. When she falls asleep in her new dormitory, in a strange bed with wheels, she awakens to find herself i [...]

    7. Charlotte Sometimes is a wistful, fascinating blend of boarding school story and time travel fantasy. When Charlotte wakes up from her first night at boarding school, she finds that she has been magically transported back into the past, where everyone thinks she's a girl called Clare, attending the same school forty years earlier. When she wakes up the next morning, she's back in her own time, but she soon realizes that she slips back and forth every night, spending every other day as Clare. Far [...]

    8. When I first heard the song which shares the title of this book by the 80's pop band, The Cure, I was enthralled. Astonishment ensued when I found out that the band had written the song about a story.I had to order the book as it is no longer in print and paid a pretty penny for something I figured would be nothing more than a keepsake for my love of The Cure. From the first page it became impossible to put the book down.I read it three times since I bought it and every time I try to figure out [...]

    9. Ostensibly a time-travel book, this little gem is actually more about figuring out who one really is. Lots of interesting historical detail thrown in besides. And it's got the perennial hook of boarding school to add to the allure. The characters rang true- especially the confusion and dismay and mustering of wits. Recommended.I read this over the summer and somehow missed reviewing it. It was a perfect book to read by the pool.

    10. I read about Charlotte Sometimes on the Chicklit message boards, and it sounded interesting; and then finding out that Robert Smith had liked it enough to write a song about it cinched the deal and I ordered myself a copy. The book tells the story of Charlotte, a new girl at a boarding school, who wakes up one morning to find a huge tree outside her bedroom window where the day before there had been none. And more disconcertingly, the girl in the bed next to her is calling her "Clare." Charlotte [...]

    11. This is an old favorite, one which I read as a child and rediscovered as an adult. It's a time travel fantasy, in which two girls at the same boarding school, one in 1918 and one in the present day (which was 1960 something---it's an old book) switch places. From a science fictional perspective, the book is flawed, not answering questions about how or why the transfer takes place. That simply isn't the point. However, by exploring the outcomes of their switching places---the bizarre relationship [...]

    12. Time travel and boarding school - how can you beat it?My friend Ellen tells me that the Cure has a song called Charlotte Sometimes based on this book. How very odd!

    13. Charlotte Sometimes is a children's novel which was published in 1969, by the English author Penelope Farmer. It was recommended to me by one of my work mates, and when I started reading it, I knew I was in for a unique reading experience. It's initially set in a boarding school, we have various students and objects described to us in detail, it's fantastic, I felt like I was there, everything was as new to me as it was to Charlotte; who finds when she wakes up, things are different again!What I [...]

    14. I was so impressed by Penelope Farmer's 'Charlotte Sometimes'. It is a story of a girl growing older, of adjusting to life away from home for the first time, or a new life amongst unfamiliars.What I appreciated most about the book were the implications it carried with it in regards to what it *is* to grow older. I think it's something of an impulse to think of childhood as something merely left behind—or that, we enter adulthood at the expense of a broad vivacity which gives our formative year [...]

    15. I came to this book somewhat late, having learnt of it only through my adoration of The Cure (Robert Smith took inspiration from the book for three of his songs - 'Charlotte Sometimes', 'Splintered in her Head' and 'The Empty World'). I now share at least one thing with Robert Smith (in addition to my teen penchant for eyeliner); we have both been haunted by this book for years. Two young girls make an improbable connection across time and space without ever actually meeting; this was hard-hitti [...]

    16. I read this book as child (probably 8 - 10 years old) and that was *coughalmostfortyyearscough* ago and all I remembered was that I totally loved it!Then recently, by a twist of fate, I discovered it was available on Audible and I couldn't resist having a nostalgic re-read.It's definitely interesting t0 revisit as an adult, it's a very English book (which I didn't remember) and its actually quite a sad too, set at the end of the war, there's soldiers dying, children losing their parents and chil [...]

    17. This is a low fantasy time-travel novel published in 1969. The story is simply told in a clear prose style. It is about a girl in a boarding school in the late 1950s who sleeps in a bed and wakes up as someone else in 1918 - the girls change places from day to day until the girl from the 50s gets stuck in 1918 when that girl is removed from the school. The rest of the narrative deals with her adjustment to living in 1918 and her attempts to get back. It's really a lovely tale, well told. I was i [...]

    18. I have the vague feeling that I've read this book in the past. It was published in 1969; I turned 8 that year. It's highly likely that I found this book in the library that same year, or the next, or the next. I was already a voracious reader and loved time travel, ghost stories, magic, historical adventure. So this would have been a clear choice with its transport of Charlotte in 1969 back into the body of Clare in 1918.The excellent thing about this book is the way Charlotte is led to thoughts [...]

    19. I loved this book and I thought it could be good for all ages.Time travel.Time travel.I don't read many time travel books because I think there are not that much out there.I RECOMMEND THIS BOOK PLEASE READ!! :)

    20. Really far out experience to read this; it combines time travel with childhood imagination to create an unforgettable story of life in the first world war.

    21. As many other reviewers have mentioned, I'd have never heard of this book if it were not for The Cure's beautiful song of the same name.I kinda wish I'd just enjoyed the music and not sought out its inspiration.The book is not completely bad or without merit. In fact, the premise is one of the most creative that I have seen in children's supernatural-themed books. The writing is quite good as well, and is surprisingly readable for an older book (not all classic books are easy for today's kids to [...]

    22. This book is about more than it seems to be. It's about time travel, I suppose, though really that's only incidental. It's about self-knowledge for Charlotte, and how she gets a little braver and more distinct in how she differs from Clare. It's also about all the other characters and how they change throughout the book, though we only ever see them through Charlotte's eyes. And it's about people never really in the book at all, like Arthur, and Emma, and Clare for that matter. It has a feeling [...]

    23. I read the first part of this book as a child but I never finished it – funny that I finished it now, in my 40s. It seems appropriate, given its time travel themes.

    24. A childhood favourite that I reread. Still loved it although it doesn't quite have the wow factor that I experienced when reading it as a child.

    25. I wish I had read this book when I was a child but actually, strangely I did not know of its existence until I saw a 40th Anniversary edition in Waterstones and was drawn by its interesting title and the fact that I am often drawn to books written by an author with the first name of Penelope; this is because it is my middle name and I am aware that it is unusual and for this reason I like it. It is a fascinating and original story of a girl named Charlotte who, on starting a new boarding school [...]

    26. Being in a new boarding school is tough enough as it is, but to wake up and find you are in another year (1918 - 40 years in the past), with a brand new name, is confusing and very scary. How can this happen and how do you get back to your present time?That is precisely what happens to Charlotte Makepeace. She goes to sleep one night and wakes up the next morning as Clare Mobley. She has somehow time- travelled back in time 40 years. Luckily she meets an older girl who has a message for her from [...]

    27. Charlotte, new student at a boarding school, has one of those days we've all had when we're new somewhere. Exhausted, nervy, confused, she goes to bed and wakes up in the same school forty years earlier. Turns out she's somehow swapped places with a schoolgirl of that time - Clare - and somehow they keep shifting places I'm rubbish at writing synopses so I apologise for the fact that the above sounds distinctly bald. Charlotte Sometimes really isn't. It reminded me of Adele Geras' Egerton Hall t [...]

    28. It's been a busy month, and I haven't gotten to do all the reading I would've liked. This weekend, I took a break from the grown-up world with a trip to Nacogdoches and this sweet young adult book from 1969, Charlotte Sometimes. Charlotte is the kind of resourceful, realistic heroine I would've loved as a twelve-year-old--heck, I loved her as a 30-year-old. Being on the beach,under a giant umbrella, knocking back whiskey and Coke made it even easier to get into the story of two little girls who [...]

    29. It is amazing how many people have read, Charlotte Sometimes, because of The Cure, myself included. The opening line of this book, is also the opening line of The Cure song of the same name, Charlotte Sometimes: "All the faces, all the voices blur. Change to one face, change to one voice" Anyone who knows the song will find it impossible to read that line without singing it in their head, or even out loud! I first read this book back the the 1980's when The Cure released the song "Charlotte Some [...]

    30. I first came across this book as an adult and being a fan of school stories I thought it would be similar to others of the genre. So it was a surprise - a pleasant one - to find out it was about much more than the usual fun on the playing fields and in the dorm kind of thing. The time-travel is central to the plot, of course, but it's the characters of the main players that are the important thing, IMO. There's a certain eeriness to this book, not surprising given its subject matter,but for thos [...]

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