Aminadab

The world of Aminadab, Maurice Blanchot s second novel, is dark, bizarre, and fantastic Reminiscent of Kafka s enclosed and allegorical spaces, Aminadab is both a reconstruction and a deconstruction of power, authority, and hierarchy The novel opens when Thomas, upon seeing a woman gesture to him from a window of a large boarding house, enters the building and slowly becThe world of Aminadab, Maurice Blanchot s second novel, is dark, bizarre, and fantastic Reminiscent of Kafka s enclosed and allegorical spaces, Aminadab is both a reconstruction and a deconstruction of power, authority, and hierarchy The novel opens when Thomas, upon seeing a woman gesture to him from a window of a large boarding house, enters the building and slowly becomes embroiled in its inscrutable workings Although Thomas is constantly reassured that he can leave the building, he seems to be separated forever from the world he has left behind The story consists of Thomas s frustrated attempts to clarify his status as a resident in the building and his misguided interactions with the cast of sickly, depraved, or in some way deformed characters he meets, none of them ever quite what they seem to be Aminadab, the man who according to legend guards the entrance to the building s underground spaces, is only one of the mysteries reified by the rumors circulating among the residents.Written in a prose that is classical and at times lyrical, Blanchot s novel functions as an allegory referring, above all, to the wandering and striving movement of writing itself.
Aminadab The world of Aminadab Maurice Blanchot s second novel is dark bizarre and fantastic Reminiscent of Kafka s enclosed and allegorical spaces Aminadab is both a reconstruction and a deconstruction o

  • Title: Aminadab
  • Author: Maurice Blanchot Jeff Fort
  • ISBN: 9780803261761
  • Page: 402
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Aminadab”

    1. Published in 1942 Vichy France, Blanchot's second novel is a suitably constricted affair: a densely philosophical, soliloquy-heavy contemplation of existence, language, and narrative, and the seemingly hopelessness of finding any meaning in any of these.At other times he would not have missed a word. But his experience had taught him already that the inhabitants of this house did not always tell the truth and that even when they were not lying, their words were rarely of any use. Besides, he cou [...]

    2. A man walking in the street looks up and sees a girl make a sign to him from the window of a house. He enters the house. The rest of the novel takes place inside this labyrinthine structure inhabited by an array of odd characters. The man, Thomas, is soon handcuffed to another younger man later referred to as Dom. For much of the book they are linked, which makes navigation difficult to say the least. Dom doesn't say much nor does he initially help Thomas in his efforts to decode the ways of the [...]

    3. Extremely fortuitous that I would read Blachot's extremely curious second novel during a period in which I have begun working graveyard shifts for the first time in about four years. This is a wonderful novel to take along w/ you as the fabric of your world begins to unfasten from its bearings and a gauze of strange confusion (between night and day, real and unreal, reasonable and unreasonable) begins to enwrap you. If the journey here is more-than-a-little-analogous to that undergone by K in Ka [...]

    4. ما شاید تلاش گسترده ای برای ایجاد انسجام، سازگاری و همکاری متقابل می کردیم که فضای تازه ای در خانه ایجاد کرده بود. با این همه اگرچه تقریباً همه از سرخوشی و آرامشی لذت می بردند که پیش از این، آن را نمیشناختند، "هیچکس خوشحال نبود” چیزی کم بود. خستگی سایه اش را بر چهرهاشان انداخته [...]

    5. I gave a not particularly enthusiastic review to Blanchot's "The Madness of the Day" wch was, at that point, the only thing I'd read by him. Then my respected colleague Franz Kamin sd I shd give him another chance so when I found this bk I picked it up. Others put in a good word for him too. I've read many 19th & 20th century French writers so I definitely have a taste for such things but Blanchot's a writer I never discovered when I was most in the thick of such interests. Whilst reading it [...]

    6. Everyone, including the translator that has written an introduction to the text, will spoil the fact the fact that this book is also about books, the house of Being. That Aminadab is not all that present in the story up until the end (p. 186). So here, let me share something from the last pages too, as if that's gonna tell you anything:"One day you notice a curious fact: from time to time, the plants feverishly move about; one would think that the clay was no longer enough to satisfy them and th [...]

    7. ilk sayfanın dördüncü paragrafındaki aşınmış tablo tasvirini okuduğumda blanchot'nun yazdığı her şeyi eksiksiz okuyacağıma karar verdim.

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