Shut Out: A Story of Race and Baseball in Boston

With a new introduction by celebrated baseball writer Roger Kahn and a new afterword by the author, updating John Henry s first year of ownership after nearly six decades of the Yawkey dynasty, the legacy of the late Will McDonough, and the author s return to his native Boston after a seventeen year absence, Shut Out has reopened the discussion of baseball, race, and BostoWith a new introduction by celebrated baseball writer Roger Kahn and a new afterword by the author, updating John Henry s first year of ownership after nearly six decades of the Yawkey dynasty, the legacy of the late Will McDonough, and the author s return to his native Boston after a seventeen year absence, Shut Out has reopened the discussion of baseball, race, and Boston with a new candor.
Shut Out A Story of Race and Baseball in Boston With a new introduction by celebrated baseball writer Roger Kahn and a new afterword by the author updating John Henry s first year of ownership after nearly six decades of the Yawkey dynasty the le

  • Title: Shut Out: A Story of Race and Baseball in Boston
  • Author: Howard Bryant
  • ISBN: 9780807009796
  • Page: 459
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Shut Out: A Story of Race and Baseball in Boston”

    1. A great historical look at the effect of choices on the future of a business. Bryant presents his case in a fair and balanced way, and while never stating that it was 100% based on prejudice, it is impossible to deny the truthfulness of his claims that the struggles of the Sox were at least partially based on prejudice.

    2. I was so excited that someone had actually taken the time to write a comprehensive book about the history of the racism within the Red Sox organization, at least up until 2002, which is when the book was published. Bryant is thorough, and he doesn't let anyone off easily, including the Boston press, who are partially responsible for bad stuff, but don't like to take responsibility for it. Here are some of the things that made me give this book fewer stars than I might have liked to:1. Bryant is [...]

    3. I've read this book three times for various purposes and I'm continually impressed. Bryant brings a masterful knowledge of social problems into the world of sports writing, making for a refreshingly informative but entertaining sports book. Bryant's analysis of Red Sox history is loaded with insider interviews of former players, awareness of the city's insular tribes, and familiarity with the cliques of sportswriters. This is a book for you if you're tired of the old "bewitched and cursed" clich [...]

    4. Excellent, and depressing for any resident of metro Boston/fan of the Sox or Civil Rights in the late 20th Century.

    5. Compelling case, although it's a hard slog - reads like a thesis, a little bit. Can't understand the Red Sox without it, though.

    6. A disappointing book. The writing is rambling and the examples don't support the author's desired end point.

    7. An eye opening account of race and baseball in Boston. A really good read, if your interested in either.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *