The Routledge Critical and Cultural Theory Reader

Everything is open to question Nothing is sacred.Critical and cultural theory invites a rethinking of some of our most basic assumptions about who we are, how we behave, and how we interpret the world around us.The Routledge Critical and Cultural Theory Reader brings together 29 key pieces from the last century and a half that have shaped the field Topics include subjecEverything is open to question Nothing is sacred.Critical and cultural theory invites a rethinking of some of our most basic assumptions about who we are, how we behave, and how we interpret the world around us.The Routledge Critical and Cultural Theory Reader brings together 29 key pieces from the last century and a half that have shaped the field Topics include subjectivity, language, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, the body, the human, class, culture, everyday life, literature, psychoanalysis, technology, power, and visuality The choice of texts, together with the editors introduction and glossary, will allow newcomers to begin from first principles, while the use of unabridged readings will also make the volume suitable for those undertaking specialized work Material is arranged chronologically, but the editors have suggested thematic pathways through the selections.
The Routledge Critical and Cultural Theory Reader Everything is open to question Nothing is sacred Critical and cultural theory invites a rethinking of some of our most basic assumptions about who we are how we behave and how we interpret the world

  • Title: The Routledge Critical and Cultural Theory Reader
  • Author: Badmington Neil
  • ISBN: 9780415433099
  • Page: 156
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Routledge Critical and Cultural Theory Reader”

    1. This Routledge book is filled with a wide expanse of interesting and evocative essays. I wouldn't recommend it as light reading, but it has a great deal to offer. This collection definitely gets your mental muscles flexing. I can't say I would have read it if it hadn't been assigned reading for my theory class, but I'm glad I got/had to read it. It was a good experience and I learned a great deal.My favourite essays are 'Panoticism' by Michel Foucault and 'How To Tame A Wild Tongue' by Gloria An [...]

    2. Some of my favorite were the readings by Gloria Anzaldúa and Roland Barthes. Definitely a must read for an insight into common themes and practices still occurring today.

    3. This book is very informative, but not something that I want to sit down and read through for fun. I'll use it again as an art historical resource, for sure.

    4. This was my primary text for my course, which we read in conjunction with the Tyson text I mentioned in an above post. This Reader is essentially a collection of essays by great thinkers. The essays themselves were interesting, and it's always good to read primary sources. I think I would've been lost without the Tyson text to accompany this, however, because there is literally NO background info or commentary on any of the readings in this book. They give you no biography info about the author, [...]

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