45

At the age of 45, Bill Drummond is less concerned with setting the record straight as making sure it revolves at the correct speed Whether he s recording Justified and Ancient with Tammy Wynette contemplating the dull lunacy of the Turner prize resisting the urge to paint landscapes or glorying in the crapness of rock comebacks he is consistently amusing and thoughtAt the age of 45, Bill Drummond is less concerned with setting the record straight as making sure it revolves at the correct speed Whether he s recording Justified and Ancient with Tammy Wynette contemplating the dull lunacy of the Turner prize resisting the urge to paint landscapes or glorying in the crapness of rock comebacks he is consistently amusing and thought provoking, and draws us into his world with the seductive enthusiasm of a born storyteller An artist with a singular approach to his work, Bill Drummond has paused to take stock of his life and a career that now spans over twenty five eventful years Famously enjoying international success with The KLF and inviting national controversy for burning a million quid with The K Foundation, these days Drummond spends much of his time writing profusely He avoids and confronts issues, infuriates and inspires those around him, muses and confuses, creates and destroys He has maintained a penchant for reckless schemes all this while drinking endless pots of tea.
At the age of Bill Drummond is less concerned with setting the record straight as making sure it revolves at the correct speed Whether he s recording Justified and Ancient with Tammy Wynette conte

  • Title: 45
  • Author: Bill Drummond
  • ISBN: 9780349112893
  • Page: 400
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “45”

    1. One of the most exquisitely-written books I've ever read. Incredibly poignant and essential if you are a fan of The Justified Ancients Of Mu Mu, pop music, or you are a man.

    2. What can I say about this book? As a long-term old-time fan of the KLF, JAMMS, etc this was the first of Bill Drummond's books (other than "The Manual") that I read, about 10 years ago. Since then I've read nearly everything he's written (even the virtually impenetrable "Wild Highway") and followed his many varied exploits as he has struggled to slough his Kingboy D persona and find his voice as both an author and artist (although I'm sure he would disagree with there being any distinction). I'v [...]

    3. he's a funny guy, very secretive, with a great history in pop - Echo & The Bunnymen/Teardrop Explodes/KLF but this is a shallow collection of articles/ chapters/ self-mythologising but very little self-analysis I would have liked more on the madness that led the KLF to burn a million pounds, and more articulation of why he hates (some) modern art so much.even for an autobiography, this is self-indulgent tosh.

    4. An interesting collection of writings by one of the art/music world's most eccentric minds. At times, equally hilarious and introspective, he goes on long-form rambles about modern life, nationalism, art buying, pop music and disillusionment. Some of the stories go a bit off the rails and had me skimming the pages, but I really enjoy his ability to take some of life's most mundane moments and reframe them in an absurdist context.

    5. So much between the lines writing. So much stuck in being some sort of particularly manly man but not.I think guys in their early 40s will find commonalities with these essays, I think artists will find some as well.I'm not sure I'd recommend it, even though I enjoyed reading it.

    6. Bill Drummond probably wouldn’t mind the assertion that his music (KLF etc) was rubbish but what mattered was the way he did it. Here we have an assortment of memories from managing Echo and the Bunnymen in Liverpool to being a regular at a Buckinghamshire public library, via a slew of imaginary bands, and what would be recognised as installations and performance art if they’d been done by someone interested in presenting them as such. On the contemporary art scene: “Very little of this di [...]

    7. Idiosyncratic journalish musings from Bill Drummond, the former KLF frontman / art prankster / Scottish ex-nationalist / middle aged da'.The pieces are written in a meandering, unbuttoned style, but Drummond can be quite charming if you're in the mood. There's something sympathetic about his failed art projects and compulsion to write. He drives around the London orbital for 25 hours, builds a cube of 20,000 Tennants cans to distribute to the homeless, buys and destroys fine art, makes soup for [...]

    8. One half of the most influential English dance music acts in this country, Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty were The KLF. Their art terrorism and anti capitalist ideas assaulted the music industry for a couple of years that brought us mu-mu land, ice cream vans, dead sheep and the burning of a million pounds. They also produced the most punk rock moment of the punk starved 90's when he opened fire on the crowd of movers, shakers and luminaries of the 1992 Brit Awards with an M16 full of blanks, whi [...]

    9. I read this one after Julian Cope's autobiography Head On/ Repossessed. Whether you think he is a tosser or not, Bill Drummond has always thought of ways to trick the public. Take for instance his stunts as THE KLF - not to mention his impact on the music industry: Inventing Chill Out, Bizzarre promo tricks which can't be emulated and introducing Echo and The Bunnymen and The Teardrop Explodes to the world.It's all documented here and in short bite sized chapters. At times the premise wears thin [...]

    10. I seem to re-read this book more and more frequently. The words and ideas flow from Bill Drummond so easily it seems. He turns the mundane into something of interest and wonder.I'm envious of the ability to spend time is such a free way, the ability to be self deprecating and open. Not all the essays work perfectly, but generally there's a kernel of something within each one wihich fires the synapses.Re-reading this in my 45th year, it seems more than ever to speak to me, and has inspired me to [...]

    11. I have a huge soft spot for Bill's former band The KLF / Justified Ancients of Mu Mu / The Timelords and all of their strange antics. The story involving cow corpses in this, for want of a better word, 'autobiography' was a bit off-putting and made me feel slightly ill, but on the whole Drummond's thoughts and stories about the music industry and the art world are hugely entertaining and, despite his predisposition towards self-mythologising, he comes across as an extremely likeable narrator.

    12. "These modern groups are all banging away at about 134 bpm -- we're still stuck at 120. I mean, we still think it's hip to pretend to be into jungle and threaten to make records at 170 bpm. We had no idea 134 was where it was at." -- June 1997, during the recording sessions for 2K's "Fuck the Millennium" one-off single. My, how things change. Currently, Drummond is proclaiming recorded music has "run its course." 2017: What the Fuck Happened?

    13. Well, maybe a 3.5. It's a little self-indulgent to write about how your art is self-indulgent crap, but his heart's in the right place. I liked the idea of walking routes that spell out something. Might be a good idea for a group run someday.

    14. As with everything written by Mr. Drummond, 45 was intriguing, willfully coy, packed with ideas (both off-the-wall and commonsensical)and extremely well-written.

    15. Well I have licked my coffee rings off the cover of your book, and dried the spit with the sleeve of your sweater. And so good morning; now for another year.

    16. Bill Drummond is obviously some kind of genius. This books makes no sense and perfect sense at the same time. I must read it again soon.

    17. I learned the virtues of Richard Long, looking at signs, going to Scandinavia, shopping-centre cafes, and growing old.

    18. Just as much as William Boyd's Any Human Heart, this is fundamentally a book about a life well lived. Capers.

    19. fantastic reminiscence and meditation on the pop music industry nostalgic, touching and sweetly sympathetic. largely irrelevant while exhibiting much style and flair - just like the man himself

    20. "when you push your boattake that step into thed just say Yes, things happen. You may have no control over them. Let them be, let them spiral out there."

    21. Insightful, clever, often hilarious, spectacularly well written, and all over the place. Yep, that's Bill Drummond for you.

    22. this is one of the greatest music books ever written. i wish i had a tenth of the wit and genius that mr. drummond has.

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