Gods and Soldiers: The Penguin Anthology of Contemporary African Writing

A one of a kind collection showcasing the energy of new African literature Coming at a time when Africa and African writers are in the midst of a remarkable renaissance Gods and Soldierscaptures the vitality and urgency of African writing today With stories from northern Arabic speaking to southern Zulu speaking writers this collection conveys thirty different ways of apprA one of a kind collection showcasing the energy of new African literature Coming at a time when Africa and African writers are in the midst of a remarkable renaissance Gods and Soldierscaptures the vitality and urgency of African writing today With stories from northern Arabic speaking to southern Zulu speaking writers this collection conveys thirty different ways of approaching what it means to be African Whether about life in the new urban melting pots of Cape Town and Luanda or amid the battlefield chaos of Zimbabwe and Somalia or set in the imaginary surreal landscapes born out of the oral storytelling tradition these stories represent a striking cross section of extraordinary writing Including works by J M Coetzee Chimamanda Adichie Nuruddin Farah Binyavanga Wainaina and Chinua Achebe and edited by Rob Spillman of Tin Housemagazine Gods and Soldiersfeatures many pieces never before published making it a vibrant and essential glimpse of Africa as it enters the twenty first century Coming at a time when Africa and African writers are in the midst of a remarkable renaissance Gods and Soldiers captures the vitality and urgency of African writing today With stories from northern Arabic speaking to southern Zulu speaking writers this collection conveys thirty different ways of approaching what it means to be African Whether about life in the new urban melting pots of Cape Town and Luanda or amid the battlefield chaos of Zimbabwe and Somalia or set in the imaginary surreal landscapes born out of the oral storytelling tradition these stories represent a striking cross section of extraordinary writing Including works by J M Coetzee Chimamanda Adichie Nuruddin Farah Binyavanga Wainaina and Chinua Achebe Gods and Soldiers features many pieces never before published making it a vibrant and essential glimpse of Africa as it enters the twenty first century
Gods and Soldiers The Penguin Anthology of Contemporary African Writing A one of a kind collection showcasing the energy of new African literature Coming at a time when Africa and African writers are in the midst of a remarkable renaissance Gods and Soldierscaptures the v

  • Title: Gods and Soldiers: The Penguin Anthology of Contemporary African Writing
  • Author: Rob Spillman Chinua Achebe Boubacar Boris Diop Laila Lalami Nawal El-Saadawi Mohamed Magani Aziz Chouaki Leila Aboulela
  • ISBN: 9780143114734
  • Page: 416
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Gods and Soldiers: The Penguin Anthology of Contemporary African Writing”

    1. Great little introduction into the diverse writers of the content. Deffo, deffo recommend. Well structured and balanced between well known writers like Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda and J.M Coetzee with fresh new writers, some of which published for the first time in this book. Every single story or essay reflects the complex fabrics that make up the African nation. Beautifully put together.Oh and I particularly loved the essay by Mia Couto. I look forward to reading more of his work.

    2. Came across this while getting ready to move. We get all sorts of books due to the nature of the job. Many are duds, but sometimes we get a gem. I'd put this in the latter category. This is an anthology of contemporary African writing, ranging from short stories and essays to snippets from longer works. Works include both fiction and nonfiction. The quality varies but for the most part I found it enjoyable. There was only one story I found irritating; the author had a severe case of "run-on sent [...]

    3. What interested me the most is that I was drawn to certain regions with Western and Northern particularly drawing my interesta good primer

    4. An anthology of nonfiction, short stories, and chapters from novels, written in Africa mostly in the past fifteen or twenty years. This is the second and more recent such anthology I have read this year. It seems to me as if the nations of Africa are producing much of the most interesting work in contemporary literature. The essays were the most interesting, an old one by Chinua Achebe, one on "the Senghor complex", one on "the Politics of Reading", and one by Mia Couto on the value of multiple [...]

    5. Rating should say "really like it" - not past tense - because I think it's an excellent collection of stories, essays and excerpts from longer works but haven't read all of it. Not a chance it can begin to cover Africa, yet it offers vivid glimpses of the continent and contemporary life there that help to correct stereotypes both old and new. Having said that, I confess that I haven't read all the short stories since I can't seem to make myself like that form. Not even by author's I like in The [...]

    6. This is a strong collection of writing (mainly fiction) from across Africa. The editor organizes the work by area, then has one nonfiction piece introduce each area's section. There are well-known names here, like Nadine Gordimer, Chimamanda Adichie, Chinua Achebe, J.M. Coetzee, and Ngugi wa Thiong'o, but my favorites were stories by Helon Habila, E.C. Osondu, and Aziz Chouaki, all of whom were new to me. If you're interested in a good overview of contemporary African fiction, this is a good pla [...]

    7. An excellent collection. I didn't love all the pieces equally, but appreciated the diversity of voices and the bits of insight into African experiences. A terrific introduction to a group of writers with varied and interesting literary approaches.

    8. A fantastic collection of about 30 short stories from African authors all around the world. I definitely will return to this to search for the full titles by many of these amazing writers.

    9. Really interesting; pieces range from philosophical to literary, adventure to the mundanity of everyday life, funny to sad as hell. All around good read.

    10. Angola (Dragonfly) by Ondjaki"Sunday was, for the doctor, a deeply personal word, a wellspring.""People will be crazy, or sane.when they want everything to become music."Cameroon (The Senghor Complex) by Patrice Nganang"I always return to what is for me a simple fact, despite it not being a commitment.""One day we will recognize this simple truth: Rwanda is the grave of Negritude.""Today the face of power in Africa is difficult to imagine without the hand of the West.""Genocide is, in essence, a [...]

    11. I've never read an 'anthology" like this before. A few of the selections were excellent and interesting, and I liked almost everything in the 'West Africa' section. I really struggled with the stuff in the second half of the book. The fiction that is just a selection from a longer work was hard for me to get interested in. Overall it was worth the effort. I'm probably a typical American in my gross ignorance of African history and culture, so this was at least a baby step in the right direction [...]

    12. Went straight to the last piece in the book by Ivan Vladislavic. I was not disappointed. Best short story I've read since Juan Villoro's "Coyote." Vladislavic has such a weird, but natural way of crafting narrative through objects and places, maps and neighborhoods. He is able to pick up on profound resonances found in simple things: garden walls, house paint and in this case a bench. Amazing.Stories read:Mohammed Neseehu Ali (Ghana): The manhood testBinyavanga Wainaina (Kenya): from Discovering [...]

    13. While the writing in this book is powerful, I was really frustrated with the number of novel excerpts in it. I was hoping for more stand-alone short stories so that I could experience many complete stories while traveling from one region to the next within the pages. Instead, this was more of a "novel sampler." However if you've never read any writing from the African continent, this is a great introduction.

    14. Very interesting. A very vivid and new outlook to the African continent and its writers. Its taken me a long time (very long) to get through though. This is partly attributed to procrastination though.

    15. Startlingly depressing and beautiful at the same time, there is more in this book than is assumed by it's small stature.

    16. Oh, it's good. I just wasn't in the mood for heavy-duty Africa. Me and every other fat and happy resident of the industrialized world, I guess.

    17. Not every piece was a standout, of course, but this anthology introduced me to lots and lots of writers and places, which is exactly what it set out to do. (Hello, friends. Long time, no post.)

    18. Impresionante. Realmente la literatura africana, junto con la del Indostán y Colombia, es lo mejor que hay hoy día (y, de éstas, prefiero la africana).

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