Theopolitical Imagination: Christian Practices of Space and Time

A critique of modern Western civilization, including contemporary concerns of consumerism, capitalism, globalization, and poverty, from the perspective of a believing Catholic.Responding to Enlightenment and Postmodernist views of the social and economic realities of our time, Cavanaugh engages with contemporary concerns consumerism, late capitalism, globalization, povertA critique of modern Western civilization, including contemporary concerns of consumerism, capitalism, globalization, and poverty, from the perspective of a believing Catholic.Responding to Enlightenment and Postmodernist views of the social and economic realities of our time, Cavanaugh engages with contemporary concerns consumerism, late capitalism, globalization, poverty in a way reminiscent of Rowan Williams Lost Icons , Nicholas Boyle Who Are We Now and Michel de Certeau Consumption of the Eucharist, he argues, consumes one into the narrative of the pilgrim City of God, whose reach extends beyond the global to embrace all times and places He develops the theme of the Eucharist as the basis for Christian resistance to the violent disciplines of state, civil society and globalization.
Theopolitical Imagination Christian Practices of Space and Time A critique of modern Western civilization including contemporary concerns of consumerism capitalism globalization and poverty from the perspective of a believing Catholic Responding to Enlightenm

  • Title: Theopolitical Imagination: Christian Practices of Space and Time
  • Author: William T. Cavanaugh
  • ISBN: 9780567088772
  • Page: 254
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Theopolitical Imagination: Christian Practices of Space and Time”

    1. This book collects three inter-related essays about the relationship of the Church with the world. "The Myth of the Sate as Savior" is a cogent argument against the notion that the "liberal" state has saved the world from religious violence. An outline of the actual alignments of the religious wars of the 16th & 17th centuries makes it crystal clear that the war was not between two religious groups but a power struggle among emerging states that were doing anything they could to solidify the [...]

    2. This is an important read. Cavanaugh outlines the history of the development of the modern state, and points his readers in the right directions for further research. He carefully articulates and defends the thesis that the modern state was designed and developed self-consciously seeking to take the place of the Church, defining "religion" into a subordinated and neutered discipline of personal study and practice. The latter half of the book interacts with various attempts by Christians to deal [...]

    3. Cavanaugh gives a theological critique of democratic capitalism and the modern state. He reworks the notion of "time" and "space" around the Eucharist, in that the Eucharist, the body of Christ, gives new time and new space for the acting out of public life. He begins with his famous essay on the so-called Wars of Religion. Contra the established myth, says Cavanaugh, the wars were not wars about religion, but came after the creation of the modern state and were tools of the modern state to figh [...]

    4. Coincidentally, I just finished this Cavanaugh book as Brad Littlejohn raved about his rereading of Cavanaugh's Torture and Eucharist. It must be a sign.In many ways, Theopolitical Imagination is a short form of Torture and Eucharist, though don't miss either. Torture and Eucharist provides much more of an empirical grounding in the theological politics of Chile, a key move that woke me from my conservative slumbers years ago.Theopolitical Imagination's great virtue is how Cavanaugh successfully [...]

    5. Cavanaugh does not disappoint in this blindingly fast little theo-political pamphlet (right around the 100 page mark). Through meticulously precise and innovative moves he unravels the historical project of nation and national identity and reveals the unspoken underpinnings that the construct rests on. A helpful parallel to his "Myth of Religious Violence," Theopolitical draws out the specific imaginative functions which are required to create concepts like "nation" and "border" and baptize them [...]

    6. What Cavanaugh does here, he does really well. His outlines of the Enlightenment political project and globalization are superb. His critique of church ambitions in those arenas was more nuanced than I had read before. His proposal for the church (that it be universal through the concrete particularly of the liturgy) remains vital. I give only 4 stars, however, because it still seems clear that church united in liturgy might be required to deal with Leviathan and Cavanaugh does not make clear wh [...]

    7. This is a fantastically revolutionary book. Cavanaugh offers a history of how the modern nation-state redefined 'religion' to consolidate political power and examines several ways Christians work at public political engagement. Instead he offers the Eucharist as our central political force. Fundamentally he's asked whether we are Americans first or Christians first, and the revolutionary freedom he's offering to us in the Eucharist is the chance to be Christians first. Be warned that this is a r [...]

    8. These essays don't go together as well as I'd like, and Cavanaugh doesn't really make his point convincingly, but his thoughts on the role of the state and church are very compelling. I would like to know more about how he believes the Eucharist can bring about a practical change in action.

    9. It could go up to 5 stars in future readings. It dealt with things I haven't read too much about. The language was different and I had trouble grasping a few things. Definitely recommend though.

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