The Sun in Splendour

Reckoned by those about him to be the most handsome man in the country, Edward the fourth has risen to the throne with the help of Warwick, the kingmaker But even Warwick s trusted advice cannot convince the King to ignore his passion for the beautiful widow, Elizabeth Woodville and when she refuses to become his mistress the two are married.Beloved of the people, EdwarReckoned by those about him to be the most handsome man in the country, Edward the fourth has risen to the throne with the help of Warwick, the kingmaker But even Warwick s trusted advice cannot convince the King to ignore his passion for the beautiful widow, Elizabeth Woodville and when she refuses to become his mistress the two are married.Beloved of the people, Edward proves himself to be a strong king, but his love of luxurious living soon begins to impact on his royal duties Despite his mistresses, Elizabeth is loyal to the illustrious king, providing him with many children, among them Edward the fifth and Richard Duke of York But Edward lived recklessly and on his death an incident from his past comes to light that will change the course of history
The Sun in Splendour Reckoned by those about him to be the most handsome man in the country Edward the fourth has risen to the throne with the help of Warwick the kingmaker But even Warwick s trusted advice cannot convi

  • Title: The Sun in Splendour
  • Author: Jean Plaidy
  • ISBN: 9780449206287
  • Page: 416
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Sun in Splendour”

    1. Too much tell and too little show, long and clunky dialogue, repetitive writing, dry prose . . . This novel has all of it.What else? Oh, all--and I mean all--the Wars of the Roses tropes to ever exist appear here. And given the book's age, I'd even hazard to guess some of the mainstay Wars of the Roses and Yorkist/Ricardian tropes were started by Plaidy with this book, and aped ad infinitum by subsequent novelists.Being fair to the lady, Plaidy doesn't make any beyond-the-pale mistake as regards [...]

    2. This is the second historical fiction book I have read about this time period (1464-1485) after I read Philippa Gregory's The White Queen. My expectations were high, and I was quite reluctant to read this book, but I decided to give it a fair trial. I will just say that giving this book a fair trial was ONE OF THE BEST DECISIONS I EVER MADE!I absoloutely loved this book! The character portrayal is different to that of Gregory's, and it was interesting to compare how two different authors portray [...]

    3. I was finally happy to get to the end. Overall a great series and story---Edward IV has never been one of my favs, not sure why. I also detest his Queen, Elizabeth Woodville.

    4. It is a thick long book and when I first started reading it I wasn't sure if I'd like it, but then it sucked me in. It is a different and interesting take to the story of King Richard who is usually villified in other plays and books. It was interesting to read the dynamics of what happens in the King's court and the power struggles that take place.

    5. This is one of a few books I've read that seek to show Richard III as less of a monster. It's an intriguing idea. As always, Ms. Plaidy knows how to pace a story. Her extensive research results in not too many liberties being taken with history-- and with history like this, there's no need to embellish.

    6. Not *the* "Sunne in Splendor" (Susan Kay Penman), but Jean Plaidy's version. I got the other one for Christmas, though! I am so glad Jean Plaidy was a Richardian, but she was brilliant so why wouldn't she have been? And yes, I cried at the end.

    7. I read this book many years ago and remember enjoying it so when I found it in the Kindle store I was keen to read it again. Will it live up to my expectations I wonder?I don't remember the story at all, vague bits came back to me. However, as before I really enjoyed it. Well written, quite descriptive but not bogged down in detail. I might seek out more historical novels by Jean Plaidy.

    8. Character: Numerous, obviously, and all the main characters are real people.Edward IV: Is the "sun in splendour." Not the most morally upright king, but popular.Elizabeth Woodville: Becomes Edward's queen (That's not a spoiler to anyone whose studied the time-period much at all). She's gorgeous and I think is described in the book as "calculating," but she loves her family.George, Duke of Clarence: You won't like him.Richard, Duke of Gloucester (Richard III): I'm on the fence about him historica [...]

    9. Review - I thought Elizabeth Woodville came across the most cleanly. Strangely, I felt that Richard III came across better than Edward IV did, and I don't mean as a better person. Edward just seemed to be a little in the background. The storyline is recognisable, with a few small changes, to the historical record. It is similar to books like The White Queen by Philippa Gregory, although this one was a little better than Gregory's effort.Genre? - Historical Fiction / Drama / RomanceCharacters? - [...]

    10. This book is a fictional account of the reigns of Edward IV of England and his brother Richard III. Not many people in this novel come off too well except for Richard III.The basic historical facts are covered herein, but the motivations and characters of the principal characters may not have been accurately portrayed. I have read other more satisfying books about these two reigns and don't take Shakespeare's Richard III as any serious version of the character of Richard. And probably not this b [...]

    11. Edward IV (son of Richard, Duke of York, fromRed Rose of Anjou) claims the throne. He marries Elizabeth Woodville, and their children include Elizabeth, Edward and Richard. Edward IV dies, and his son, Edward V (a child) becomes king. Edward V and his brother Richard, Duke of York, are the "princes in the tower". Richard III (brother of Edward IV and uncle to Edward V) declares the princes illegitimate and takes the crown for himself. He marries Anne Neville (daughter of the Earl of Warwick).

    12. Cant go wrong reading Jean Plaidy's books. Always draws you right in. I notice lately that many have difficulty recalling names (too hard) and constant mis-spellings (it's called "old english" actually)I love reading books centered around these times in ancient history and at one time had every book Jean had written on the throne of England through various Kings, Queens and cohorts.

    13. I loved the book, as I love all Jean Plaidy books, but I wish I had been able to get hold of an earlier edition. My copy had obviously been re-edited, and the punctuation was awful - whole paragraphs would be written without any commas. Whoever re-edited for the new edition needs a good slap. If there's one thing I can't stand, it's lack of commas.

    14. Very disappointing Plaidy made up pages of conversation, repeated salient plot points much too often, and constructed some of her characters out of cardboard of the romance genre. Too bad, for I enjoyed and even admired The Star of Lancaster.

    15. I really liked reading this story as I have a great interest in medieval monarchs and the war of the roses is one of my favorite stories. I wish I could go back in time and seen the young king Edward who fell so madly in love that he defied his advisers in marrying someone of questionable rank.

    16. I really loved this book although the end was sad as I knew it would be the end of the plantagenets. I would recommend it to anyone who would like to know more about the war of roses and the reigns of the sons of Cecily Neville and the Duke of York.

    17. I wasn't overly impressed, there seems to be very little characterisation. I didnt get that history coming to life sense and the historical story is so interesting anyway that you'd think it would be hard for it not to be an amazing book, yet it was only so so.

    18. I really enjoyed this book even though I (accidentally) started with #14 in the series. I think I'll read 1-13 sometime this year!

    19. I read this book a while ago but remember loving it. It is historical fiction about the War of the Roses and is very long. However it really brings the characters alive.

    20. Alice is my favourite character so I really looked forward to this book. Loved it as much as all the others although I found the ending a bit rushed. Roll on the next book

    21. A good, brisk tale of the two Yorkist Kings - Edward IV & Richard III - and their wives from the start of Edward's reign. Plaidy leaves open the fate of the two princes.

    22. I've read so many different accounts of Elizabeth Woodville, and I wish I knew what was true and not true. This was a very entertaining retelling of the story, an easy read for sure. I liked it.

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