Wildest Place on Earth

The Barnes Noble ReviewThe editor of Sanctuary, the journal of the Massachusetts Audubon Society, offers an unusual twist on the genre of nature writing by using Italian garden design as a framework for exploring the meaning of wildness This is not as much of a stretch as you might imagine Over the centuries, Italian gardens have always incorporated wild spaces asThe Barnes Noble ReviewThe editor of Sanctuary, the journal of the Massachusetts Audubon Society, offers an unusual twist on the genre of nature writing by using Italian garden design as a framework for exploring the meaning of wildness This is not as much of a stretch as you might imagine Over the centuries, Italian gardens have always incorporated wild spaces as part of the overall design It is the balance of order and disorder, of control and freedom that gives these gardens their special qualities.I took a particular interest in this book, having procured my own small urban garden Like the author, I, too, had sought nature in the properly designated places, such as the Catskills, so I was interested in knowing if he thought the possibility for wildness could exist in some landscape of human creation In John Hanson Mitchell s case, his home in the woods ensured that wild nature was always a presence I enjoyed his tales of creating an Italian garden in the middle of the forest, complete with a formal hedge maze, but what struck me was his sensitivity to the unexpected moments of wildness to be found in domesticated spaces Pan, the archaic embodiment of wildness, figures prominently in the book After finishing it which took longer than usual because I couldn t bring myself to rush through it I came away with the hope that Pan might visit me one day in my little sanctuary The Wildest Place on Earth is a lovely meditation on the relationship between the creations of humankind and those of nature Laura Wood, Science Nature Editor
Wildest Place on Earth The Barnes Noble ReviewThe editor of Sanctuary the journal of the Massachusetts Audubon Society offers an unusual twist on the genre of nature writing by using Italian garden design as a framework f

  • Title: Wildest Place on Earth
  • Author: John Hanson Mitchell
  • ISBN: 9781582432151
  • Page: 299
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Wildest Place on Earth”

    1. An interesting ramble through the history of 'wildness' and attempts to capture that sense of wildness in planned gardens of the last few centuries. A good book for reflection and to open ones eyes to the effect a good garden plan can have on the visitor.

    2. I'm split over this book. I expected something very different. It was recommended to me by a colleague, and overall, it was enjoyable. The subtitle (Italian Gardens and the Invention of Wilderness) had me convinced it would actually be about Italian gardens. It was only glancingly--through the lens of famous American authors who have been inspired by Italian gardens. Which is fine in itself, but I wanted to actually learn about the gardens' histories themselves. I also get the feeling that the a [...]

    3. Caution: this book is going to make you want to garden, create a labyrinth, and travel extensively in Italy. It was a little all-over-the-place at times, but I really enjoyed it. (But I will admit to loving any book that includes Pan as one of its main themes.) I didn't always agree with the author and his views on 'wilderness', but I appreciated the fact that he felt like you could create a place in nature for yourself anywhere - its all about how you relate to the land.

    4. This is a charming book, tracing the rich and varied history of Italian gardens and the ancient labyrinths and linking both to the author's own efforts on his Massachusetts property. At times the writing seems a bit coy and self-indulgent, and the ending seemed abrupt. But there's much to enjoy in this delightful work.

    5. After 14 years I have finally read one of Clayton's fathers books! I'm not sure what took me so long. I really enjoyed this book about gardens, labyrinth, Pan and exploration of what wilderness really means.

    6. This book changed the way I think about the world I live in. But it's worth reading just for the gardening history and his stories about his house and family.

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