Dulcitius

Dulcitius is a Latin comedy written by Hrosvitha of Gandersheim, a member of the female Abbey of Gandersheim in Lower Saxony Written between 935 973, Dulcitius is widely believed to be her most comic work The play treats the figure of Dulcitius, governor of Thessalonica, as a subject for a comedy in the style of Terence Although the play is dark its plot depicts the iDulcitius is a Latin comedy written by Hrosvitha of Gandersheim, a member of the female Abbey of Gandersheim in Lower Saxony Written between 935 973, Dulcitius is widely believed to be her most comic work The play treats the figure of Dulcitius, governor of Thessalonica, as a subject for a comedy in the style of Terence Although the play is dark its plot depicts the imprisonment and martyrdom of the three sisters, Agape, Chionia, and Irena, at Dulcitius s hand nevertheless its business is presumably deemed less grave because of the reward awaiting the Christian sufferers.
Dulcitius Dulcitius is a Latin comedy written by Hrosvitha of Gandersheim a member of the female Abbey of Gandersheim in Lower Saxony Written between Dulcitius is widely believed to be her most comic

  • Title: Dulcitius
  • Author: Hrotsvitha
  • ISBN: 9783150075241
  • Page: 205
  • Format: None
  • 1 thought on “Dulcitius”

    1. Disclaimer- I’m in a “Women in Medieval Literature” class this semester, so yes I’m going to add every little thing we read just so I can feel better about my ‘read’ numbers. This was the first thing we read and I thought it was entertaining, much funnier than I was expecting, and i’ll be looking forward to discussing it more in class.

    2. I figured it had to be about time to read the first female playwright's play since I had made it my express goal to read all other first things out there (first recorded play and written work, et cetera). And yeah, I wasn't a big fan.If you're thinking that Dulcitius is about a guy named Dulcitius you'd be partially correct. It's about the three Christian virgins Agape, Chiona, and Irena as they're brutally tortured by the Roman powers-that-be (one of them being Dulcitius). So I don't quite unde [...]

    3. this odd little christian play was also oddly the most entertaining play read in my textbook so far! for once everything rhymed, and there was a clear comedy with just-as-clear serious allegorical elements! the power of women being just plain smarter than literally all the men around them! I'm not religious, so the christian messages did nothing for me (sorry hrotsvitha, didn't convert me this time), but I appreciated that they were not so specific to christianity, since the basic themes of the [...]

    4. Dulcitius is a short play by a 10th century nun. In most aspects it pales in comparison with the work of Greece and the Golden age of the fallen empire, especially in length, depth and technical quality. It is nonetheless elevated by the passion its author infuses and the very believable female characters, I mean, as it is reflected in the style of voice and dialogues, not especially their actions.Granted, I imagine there is little a girl freshly confronted with the loving religion herein contem [...]

    5. I had never heard of Hrotsvitha until I took a class in theatre history, ranging from classical Greco-Roman plays to about 1500. This play of hers is clearly meant to express its message (the triumph of faith in Christ against persecution leading to martyrdom) regardless of beauty of expression (there isn't much) or character development (again, slim pickings). If you want to read this extremely brief play (in my Norton textbook, it was only six-and-a-half pages) for the sake of historical compl [...]

    6. *1.8I can't say I cared for it too much. Maybe it would've been better in the original (Latin)?The translation felt overly terse – or perhaps that is not an artifact of the language so much as the stylistic convention at the time. Either way, it seemed half (or more) of the dialogue's purpose was to describe what they were doing. It was funny only in a very surface way – and perhaps this is just me being me and generally not appreciating comedies so much – but like, a guy tries to kiss(/ra [...]

    7. Finally done. Read this in the original Latin for class. Silly, but not in an engaging way. In English, I'm sure this would be a much more enjoyable read.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *