Sacred Violence: The European Crusades to the Middle East, 1095-1396

In Sacred Violence, renowned medieval historian Jill N Claster examines warfare between Christians and Muslims for control of the embattled city of Jerusalem Beyond the battlefield, however, Claster explains the relationship of Jews, Christians, and Muslims to the Holy City and how that relationship still resonates today The book encompasses the history of the kingdom fIn Sacred Violence, renowned medieval historian Jill N Claster examines warfare between Christians and Muslims for control of the embattled city of Jerusalem Beyond the battlefield, however, Claster explains the relationship of Jews, Christians, and Muslims to the Holy City and how that relationship still resonates today The book encompasses the history of the kingdom founded by the Crusaders which lasted, against all odds, for two hundred years, and details the richness that emerged from the interplay of its many cultural groups It also tells the story of how and why the Crusades came about, their impact on the Middle East and Europe, and their legacy to subsequent generations.Sacred Violence includes twenty eight black and white images, a sumptuous colour insert, and numerous maps to draw the reader closer to this tumultuous history A chronology and a list of key rulers provide further clarification of events An extensive bibliography is included.
Sacred Violence The European Crusades to the Middle East In Sacred Violence renowned medieval historian Jill N Claster examines warfare between Christians and Muslims for control of the embattled city of Jerusalem Beyond the battlefield however Claster e

  • Title: Sacred Violence: The European Crusades to the Middle East, 1095-1396
  • Author: Jill N. Claster
  • ISBN: 9781442600607
  • Page: 380
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Sacred Violence: The European Crusades to the Middle East, 1095-1396”

    1. I read this for my Age of Chivalry class and, as far as assigned reading goes, this was great. I was very impressed with the writing. Claster made all the information very easy to understand and follow, and I never found myself bored while reading. (Props to Professor Baum for choosing such interesting reading material.)

    2. The Crusades, this time with a liberal bias. Claster is good and informative and provides excellent research, but her book isn't a page turner like her counterpart Madden is. She's sometimes overly sympathetic with the Muslims, which is fine, but it almost seems like she wrote it in a direct response to Madden's "Concise History" to create a historiographical counterpoint.

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