The Rector of Justin

Regarded as one of Louis Auchincloss s most accomplished novels, THE RECTOR OF JUSTIN centers on Frank Prescott, the founder of an exclusive school for boys Eighty years of his life unfold through the observations of six narrators, each with a unique perspective on the man, his motivations, and the roots of his triumphs and failings.
The Rector of Justin Regarded as one of Louis Auchincloss s most accomplished novels THE RECTOR OF JUSTIN centers on Frank Prescott the founder of an exclusive school for boys Eighty years of his life unfold through the

  • Title: The Rector of Justin
  • Author: Louis Auchincloss
  • ISBN: 9780618224890
  • Page: 254
  • Format: Paperback
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    1. The author of The Rector of Justin, Louis Auchincloss, is the last novelist of “Old Money” in America, and may be considered as the inheritor of the tradition of Henry James and Edith Wharton. He possesses neither the genius of James nor the subtlety of Wharton, but he writes with clarity, builds an exemplary novel, and—being a product of Old Money himself (of the New York variety)—explores a world he knows well with an affection tempered by understanding.The Rector of Justin presents us [...]

    2. THE RECTOR OF JUSTIN. (1964). Louis Auchincloss. *****.I have avoided this author’s works for the past sixty years because I thought his plots only involved the very rich families of New York. Not a good reason to avoid him, but it made me feel that I would encounter another Edith Wharton, with whose books I usually fell asleep with. I hope this doesn’t bring a spate of letters from fans of Edith Wharton. It turns out that I was right, in a way. The author does write about the privileged cla [...]

    3. What if at the end of your life you looked back and saw that the kingdom you had formed was nothing at all like what you imagined it would be, in fact, it lays crumbling at your feet? Is that a life worth living?Frank Prescott is the larger-than-life progenitor of a New England Preparatory School who shapes the school and the boysby the force of his personality, a force that cannot possibly be passed down. In The Rector of Justin a young protege of Prescott, Aspinwall, details the stories of Fra [...]

    4. Another of my summer new-to-me authors and quite good. I came to this one because of a review in Second Reading: Notable and Neglected Books Revisited. It is a character study of Dr. Frank Prescott, Episcopalian minister, headmaster and founder of what is supposed to be one of the foremost New England boarding schools for boys. He is a larger than life man who was both revered and hated. We are given six points of view.This Auchincloss book is sprinkled with literary references from O'Hara (who [...]

    5. The Rector of Justin is as exquisite, refined, and quietly intelligent as the society it describes. Genius? No, there is no radiance here, but what would we read if we read for geniuses only? Even the majority of geniuses are only capable of one book of genius - with minor constellations circling and illuminating the singular consequence. More fundamentally, geniuses are rarely born of the society Auchincloss describes. Still, is the book brilliant? Brilliantly fulfilled? Yes. I was not committe [...]

    6. ‘El rector de Justin’ de Louis Auchincloss es una novela con una clara influencia de Henry James, ya que tiene bastante del aire intelectual, serio y reflexivo de James. Es casi una novela de ideas y habla de temas como religión, fe, valor, honor, vanidad, sinceridad, etc. Pero es también una novela que retrata un mundo que ya ha desaparecido, el de los colegios privados religiosos de Nueva Inglaterra, pero por extensión también retrata el mundo de las clases dirigentes americanas de fin [...]

    7. Auchincloss proves that the intellectual novel can contain sympathetic characters who make speeches and discuss idealogy. Perhaps he wrote at a time when longer attention spans of readers gave his characters the luxury to invest in elaborate discourses on the state of the nation and the states of their hearts and minds.I recall an initial draft of a novel I wrote in a similar vein which came back from a publisher saying that the characters were wooden and that there was insufficient action and n [...]

    8. A compelling novel about a mysterious personality. Francis Prescott is the headmaster of a boarding school for boys. The book is told through a series of testimonies written by Prescott's students, family, and coworkers. Some love him, some hate him, all are affected by him.Auchincloss's style is lucid and bright. And the book reads as a treatise about the power and travails of huge personalities like Prescott's. Can high ideals ever be realizable through a high-minded school like Justin Martyr? [...]

    9. I found this book through the The Official Preppy Handbook, because it is about the director of a fictional prep school outside Boston. I really enjoyed the book. I liked following the stories of the different characters, and the book raised several issues to think about: is love or devotedness more important for children; when should an elderly person step down and allow a younger one to take over; is changing with the times or sticking to tradition more important; is it worth it to make a lot [...]

    10. This is one of Auchincloss's two best works. He was probably the last great novelist of manners, and certainly the best depicter of the upper class of New York. His depiction of Frank Prescott, headmaster of the eponymous boys' prep school, is nuanced and vivid. His triumphs and failures, seen through the eyes of the admiring yet troubled narrator, are all the more epic in scope for being painted on such a small canvas. In the end, headmaster and narrator alike realize that Prescott's influence [...]

    11. I first read The Rector of Justin when I was young and I remember wondering idly which versions of events were the true ones and who was reliable and who not. Then I shrugged and walked away from the novel for 45 years.This time I've read it with intensity and have worn a new wrinkle in my brow trying to decide half a hundred questions: was Horace wise to talk Eliza out of marrying Frank; did Jules commit suicide; did Griscam manipulate the rector or did the rector manipulate him; did the old ma [...]

    12. This is a heartfelt "biographical" story of a headmaster who has a bigger than life persona & the clerical teacher who was his friend & confidant. There were times it reminded me of `Owen Meany` & times it reminded me of `The Great Santini` in flavor & spirit. I really sailed through it because it was absolutely fascinating.

    13. My very first Auchincloss: thoroughly enjoyable with an air of authenticity in its depiction of a New England church school for boys. Written with obvious first-hand experience. The book has an unusual structure, but it all works seamlessly.

    14. I started this famous book expecting to be disappointed and I was.The story describes the elite world looking out from a prep school in the late 19th and early 20th Century. Few details were meaningful for me, whose own high school was similarly all boys, private, religious although decades later. On a grand level, yes, it's true about sermons and often-excessive discipline. Yes boys make mistakes which are forgiven or forgotten, but his message doesn't get past cliches and infatuation with soci [...]

    15. After battling thru Lincoln in the Bardo, I decided for a more readable novel. I liked this very Jamesian portrait of an elite school educator. Auchincloss sweeps around his character through the voices of other character and lets the reader make his own portrait. I once taught at a private boy's school on the Philly Main Line, so the atmosphere was vaguely familiar. Auchincloss examines the timeless American dilemma between idealism and realism, Christianity and ruthless Wall Street market capi [...]

    16. I'd never heard of Auchincloss until recently, but when I read that some considered him a sort of 20th century American version of Anthony Trollope (my favorite author) I was happy to give him a try. The Rector of Justin, which is generally regarded as Auchincloss's best work, was definitely worth my time. Not at the level of even lesser Trollope, but far better than most of the fiction I pick up.

    17. Auchincloss masterpiece is still relevant today. The story of Frank Prescott whose dream is to found a traditional New England prep school still rings true today. The author's ear for dialogue is sharp and his discussion of the prejudices inherent in the very idea of such a school is complete. However, the principal character shines through with all his flaws. His life is examined under the Auchincloss microscope and although he comes out on the plus side, there is much regret. I did not care fo [...]

    18. In the Rector of Justin, the character of Dr. Francis Prescott, the rector of Justin Martyr Academy, is revealed by the various memoirs and journals about Prescott that are assembled by his disciple Brian Aspinwall.

    19. A multi-angle biography of Frank Prescott's life and work as the founder and headmaster of Justin Martyr, a private, Christian school near Boston.Lots of fodder. I need an interpreter though to help process it.

    20. Louis Auchincloss was a favorite author of Ruth Lord. This story takes place at a private boys' Episcopal school.

    21. ATTN: Spoilers Abound"The Rector of Justin" is a laudable book by a classic 20th century writer, Louis Auchincloss, writing in the full bloom of his powers.That's not to say you're going to like it.During his lifetime Auchincloss wrote over forty books, half of which became bestsellers. In "The Rector of Justin" he gives us the biography of a fictional "great man," Dr. Francis Prescott, the founder of an equally fictional New England prep school for boys, "Justin Martyr."The tone of the book is [...]

    22. Leigh Bortins and others had recommended this book to me. David Hicks also mentions it in his book, Norms and Nobility. I finally got around to reading this Thanksgiving weekend.I must say I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. It is a peaceful read, not a lot of excitement or intensity. It is not the 'plot' that drives the story, rather the curiosity of the character from whose perspective the book is written. The story is primarily communicated through Aspinwall's journal entries. However, once he d [...]

    23. Framed by fictional diary entries of a young schoolmaster at the start of WWII, this novel is a profile of an influential founder of a New England prep school. Though an attempt is made to distinguish this founder (Frank Prescott) from the real-life Endicott Peabody by mentioning the latter explicitly as an historical figure, it seems likely that Peabody was something of a model for Prescott. About a quarter of the way through this book I became frustrated that it lacked the structure of a tradi [...]

    24. I finished it a few days after starting, and apart from thinking it is one of the best novels Auchincloss wrote - everyone thinks that - it does act as a corrective to the flashy writing that gets the praise. Sure, this is a novel out of its time. But it is elegant, beautifully crafted, and subtly demanding. The dusty feel to such prose is out of fashion but if that doesn't bother you, please read it. Auchincloss sits with Edith Wharton, and occupies that position comfortably. The two would have [...]

    25. I was reading Auchincloss's obit in the NYT recently and I realized that I hadn't read any of his books. Many critics consider this his most ambitious novel. I must say I enjoyed it. It was dense and intellectual and it sent me to the dictionary many times for such words as athwart, encomium and epicene. It also challenged my knowledge of philosophy and literature, assuming I knew more about Plato and Samuel Richardson than I really do! I like a book that pushes me in this way. It started out a [...]

    26. I read this book based upon the the reading list by Joseph L. Badaracco Jr.'s for his course The Moral Leader in the HBS MBA program. As an accidental businessman and part-time intellectual, I find myself looking to literature for insights into the life I am leading. I found this book to provide some comfort to that common business condition - no matter your best efforts, sometimes the people you work with are hurt by your decisions and your relationships forever suffer. And yet, at the same tim [...]

    27. Auchincloss has written a portrait of a private school headmaster, Frank Prescott, as told through the eyes of a new teacher at Justin Martyr, supposedly one of the best private boys' schools in New England. He says he is thinking of writing a biography of whom he considers a "great man", but never gets around to it. Nevertheless, a full picture of Prescott emerges, as revealed in personal impressions, several fragments of biographical sketches, and personal interviews with present colleagues an [...]

    28. This is the story of Rev. Francis Prescott, the rector of Justin Martyr, a fictitious well-known prep school for boys in Massachusetts. The novel begins in September 1939 when Brian Aspinwall begins his career at the school as an instructor of English. Prescott is held in awe by the faculty and alumni of the school, and Brian decides to compile the story of Prescott’s life and tenure at the school. The story is told by five other narrators who have near connections to Prescott: David Griscam, [...]

    29. A friend urged me to read this book, loaned it to me. I am so grateful. It's the story of a lifetime relationship between a man and the boarding school he founded. As I read it I recognized situations, mini-plots and characters from my own boarding school experiences, and how those events, etc. were unique to the prep school setting. By the time I finished the book in my mind my days at Proctor Academy had been relived at "Justin". If you've had similar life experiences, or are interested in the [...]

    30. Dr. Francis Prescott founded Justin Martyr, an exclusive prep school in New England. He is the rector of Justin. His life and career are chronicled by several individuals, and each account reveals a different side of the greatly admired man. The storytellers are as follows:• His oldest friend;• An admiring young teacher;• Three students of differing generations; and • One of his daughters.Together they paint a rich portrait of the distinguished rector of Justin.The first half of this nov [...]

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