Jella

This is Dea Birkett s story of her voyage from Lagos, along the West African coast and across the ocean to Liverpool, as a member of crew on a working cargo vessel the only woman on board It traces her slow, awkward progress from being a girl in a flowery dress who walked up the gangway in Apapa Docks, Lagos, to the boiler suited cadet called Jella small boy in thThis is Dea Birkett s story of her voyage from Lagos, along the West African coast and across the ocean to Liverpool, as a member of crew on a working cargo vessel the only woman on board It traces her slow, awkward progress from being a girl in a flowery dress who walked up the gangway in Apapa Docks, Lagos, to the boiler suited cadet called Jella small boy in the language of the Sierra Leonean crew The book is also a testament to the men the author sailed with, the last of those who have been working the West African trade route for over a hundred years This was to be one of their last voyages The shipping line has folded, and with it the way of life at sea to which Dea Birkett was a last, privileged witness She also wrote Spinsters Abroad Victorian Lady Explorers and Pitcairn.
Jella This is Dea Birkett s story of her voyage from Lagos along the West African coast and across the ocean to Liverpool as a member of crew on a working cargo vessel the only woman on board It traces he

  • Title: Jella
  • Author: Dea Birkett
  • ISBN: 9783442711567
  • Page: 452
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Jella”

    1. "Die Suche nach Stille und Einsamkeit, die uns Europäer antreibt, wird in Afrika als Krankheit oder psychische Störung behandelt." (S. 81)"Das ist Jella", wird die Frau im weißen Arbeitsoverall vorgestellt, wenn jemand an Bord der Minos kam. Da auf der Strecke von Lagos nach Liverpool längst keine Passagiere mehr transportiert werden, muss die merkwürdige Person ja eine Bezeichnung erhalten. Jella bedeutete kleiner Junge, Lehrling, Schiffsjunge. Umständehalber war die Autorin zum Matrosen [...]

    2. An enjoyable read about a sea journey from Africa to UK. It does make you wonder though if she is exploiting the sailors she writes about.

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