The Elephant in the Classroom: Helping Children Learn and Love Maths

Techniques and strategies for teachers to use in interesting their pupils in mathematics.
The Elephant in the Classroom Helping Children Learn and Love Maths Techniques and strategies for teachers to use in interesting their pupils in mathematics

  • Title: The Elephant in the Classroom: Helping Children Learn and Love Maths
  • Author: Jo Boaler
  • ISBN: 9780285638471
  • Page: 338
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Elephant Etymology The word elephant is based on the Latin elephas genitive elephantis elephant , which is the Latinised form of the Greek elephas genitive elephantos , probably from a non Indo European language, likely Phoenician It is attested in Mycenaean Greek as e re pa genitive e re pa to in Linear B syllabic script.

    1 thought on “The Elephant in the Classroom: Helping Children Learn and Love Maths”

    1. What's Math Go To Do With It? and The Elephant in the Classroom by Jo Boaler are different versions of the same book. The first focuses on American classrooms, while the second takes a United Kingdom approach. While it's interesting to compare the different examples and approaches, they're basically the same book.[return][return]Boaler does an excellent job exploring the importance of math for today's digital citizens while discussing the need for changes in teaching practices.[return][return]If [...]

    2. Made me fall in love with Maths again, and I'm a History Teacher! Raises really improtant and interesting questions and ideas about teaching any subject. Written for specialists and non-specialists in mind, even I could follow it.

    3. I love this book. It is a guiding light. The author's writing and research is very insightful. Every parent of a school-aged child should read this.

    4. Fantastic book to read for any teacher or parent, well written and covers many topics currently taught on PGDE courses

    5. This book is fantastic for any teacher or parent that wants to gain insight into raising attainment and interest in mathematics. Boaler provides insight into how mathematics is traditionally taught and outlines her methods and research on what she considers to be the future of mathematics teaching. She also provides lists of many different sources, such as: books, games, websites and apps that are available to engage children. This books aim is to change the perception that mathematics is abstra [...]

    6. A book every math teacher should read. It's already changed some of the things I do in my classroom and made me proud and assured of some practices I employed previous to reading it.

    7. I liked this book because it opens your eyes about math and includes many different studies and some good reference books. I just gave it 4 stars because for me it was hard to read through and understand all the studies and get really sucked into the book. I started reading this book at the same time as What´s Math Got to Do With It? and I thought the second book was so much easier to understand. I also like that What´s Math Got to Do With It? focuses more on the U.S includes common core, and [...]

    8. Very accessible, not just for those teaching maths. With sections basically for everyone including teachers, students, and parents, this small book (compared to others) is really quite good. It comes with some puzzles and really stresses what maths is as opposed to what maths is taught to be.Very easy read but a good one none the less.Recommended for anyone who is interested in Maths/education or learning. 4*

    9. I was inspired by Boaler's passion and desire to see young people learn maths in a creative and dynamic setting, and was won over by her arguments for mixed ability sets, and the effective employment of group work. I would have appreciated more practical ways that I could transfer this to my classroom practice, although my pupils have benefited from her 'number talks' ideas.An excellent read, Boaler's work is very important.

    10. A good book only problem is, it didn't tell me anything I didn't know and won't be read by the people that need to read it.But hey ho. Doesn't mean it shouldn't have been written. Some of the research projects are great.

    11. A fantastic book to make you think about how maths is taught. I have always loved learning about maths and teaching it. Many of the reluctant mathematicians in my class have grown to love maths with the enthusiasm that I have shared with them. I would recommend this to anyone who teaches maths.

    12. Really interesting and enlightening - challenged a number of preconceptions I had about maths teaching.

    13. I read this as I'm about to start my teacher training in a months time, it's an excellent read which raises some very interesting points.

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