Doctor Who: Father Time

The Doctor is living alone in a farmhouse, with his books, experiments and cats for company He still doesn t know who he is, but the blue Police Box outside looks vaguely familiar.Giving private tuition to a dazzlingly gifted ten year old named Miranda, the Doctor learns that she and her family have fled the planet Klade There was a bloody revolution there, in which allThe Doctor is living alone in a farmhouse, with his books, experiments and cats for company He still doesn t know who he is, but the blue Police Box outside looks vaguely familiar.Giving private tuition to a dazzlingly gifted ten year old named Miranda, the Doctor learns that she and her family have fled the planet Klade There was a bloody revolution there, in which all the imperial family was slaughtered, with the exception of the infant Miranda Her nanny brought her to Earth, to save her from the atrocities of the Republicans, but the Imperialists are after her too.
Doctor Who Father Time The Doctor is living alone in a farmhouse with his books experiments and cats for company He still doesn t know who he is but the blue Police Box outside looks vaguely familiar Giving private tuiti

  • Title: Doctor Who: Father Time
  • Author: Lance Parkin
  • ISBN: 9780563538103
  • Page: 119
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Doctor Who: Father Time”

    1. WHAT A FANTASTIC STORY! I want so badly for Miranda to reappear in the story now!!! (edit: There is a picture of her in his wallet in Doctor Who: The Year of Intelligent Tigers apparently. But she needs to be in the show.) Even though the pacing is a bit choppy and there's some teenage angst, it's a wonderful story overall with a few really cool new characters. The Doctor still hasn't found his memories and you can really see the effect it's having on him. Good job, author people. If you love th [...]

    2. nwhytevejournal/2092950ml[return][return]Years before Georgia Moffett sprang from David Tennant's thigh (or wherever), the Eighth Doctor had an adopted daughter: Miranda Dawkins, lost scion of a imperial family from the far future, growing up in the vividly recalled 1980s (reminiscences of Thatcherism rather appropriate for the moment), the target of youthful desire from her classmates and assassination attempts from her political enemies, and trying to get to grips with both. It's not completel [...]

    3. I found this book to be a bit different from most of the other Doctor Who books I've read. In this story the Doctor has lost his memory of all of his previous lives, so he's living as a 'mostly' normal human being. This slows down the story a bit. However, just because the Doctor's forgotten who he is, doesn't mean that his enemies have forgotten him.So join the Doctor as he: Doesn't have his sonic screwdriver, keeps his TARDIS in his backyard as a lawn ornament(since he has forgotten what it is [...]

    4. Featuring Paul McGann's 8th Doctor, Father Time is one of a number of novels published by BBC Books when the series was on hiatus. It's also from halfway through an arc-plot, in which the Doctor can't remember who he is or what's happened to him. Accept that, and jump in. I'm sure there are additional references to that arc through the book, but I didn't spot them, and had no trouble enjoying the book in its own right. The story takes place over a decade, and finds the Doctor accidentally adopti [...]

    5. Exciting, emotional, violent, poignantere's a very 21st century series vibe to this classic series tale, and it's definitely one of the high watermarks of the BBC Books 8th Doctor amnesia arc. I found the ending to be a bit of a quick tie-up, compared to the build-upbut what a magnificent build-up it was. If only the first section of this arc ended here, and not with the less-than-thrilling "Escape Velocity"but we can't have everything.

    6. Sort of bizarre but good. The Doctor as a sort of super business consultant kind of meshes with his traditional 'scientific advisor' role, and if it had been made clear that he viewed it all as an interesting exercise in problem solving that just happened to result in a lot of money, I'd have been happier than with Millionaire!Doctor (OK, I am biased - I remember reading this brilliant story where he, Fitz and Anji were playing Monopoly and Anji was getting incredibly frustrated with the Doctor' [...]

    7. This was one of the better Eighth Doctor Adventures, I felt, and definitely one of the more accessible and less convoluted ones. The loss of the Doctor's memories meant the EDA could have almost a partial soft reboot of the Doctor and his adventures, which I imagine gave authors like Parkin a bit more freedom in terms of allowing the Doctor to be less of a know-it-all. Having come to this after a lot of audio and television , it's all rather refreshing.It's lovely seeing the Doctor as a father a [...]

    8. The Doctor is now in the 1980s, he has some memories but is still not himself. He gets embroiled in an alien blood feud, and finds a child with similar biology to his own. This is a character driven piece, with the Doctor still trying to find himself, while becoming a father. There's still lots of questions about this novel, who is Miranda, and what happened to the Time Lords. A very good read.

    9. This was the first Doctor Who book I've read. I have a few more sitting on the bookshelf and after finishing this one, I'll be reading more.Doctor who has a daughter? He doesn't use the TARDIS (or even know what it is)? He doesn't own a sonic screwdriver and he still saves the day?! Awesome!

    10. Lance Parkin generally does a good job with his Doctor Who stories, and Father Time doesn't disappoint. It's a good tale, taking place over a decade, with lots of action and character development. And the Doctor gets (another!) a daughter to raise!

    11. Not bad, enjoyable but nothing special. The main villain kept changing his motivations for no discernible reason.

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