Doctor Who: Blue Box

The Nineteen Eighties as we enter the Age of the Personal Computer, the newborn Internet spreads across America, and the computer invasion enters our homes Across the technological frontier, an incredible war begins between the criminals and their savvy opponents A brilliant young programmer, a beautiful college student, and a mysterious hacker known only as The DoctThe Nineteen Eighties as we enter the Age of the Personal Computer, the newborn Internet spreads across America, and the computer invasion enters our homes Across the technological frontier, an incredible war begins between the criminals and their savvy opponents A brilliant young programmer, a beautiful college student, and a mysterious hacker known only as The Doctor join forces to combat an electronic threat fallen into the hands of a notorious computer outlaw Respected computer journalist Charles Chick Peters was an eyewitness as these unlikely heroes fought their hi tech skirmishes across the nation s vunerable capital and inside the world of the computer Blue Box is the compelling true story of a secret computer project that could literally change the way you think.
Doctor Who Blue Box The Nineteen Eighties as we enter the Age of the Personal Computer the newborn Internet spreads across America and the computer invasion enters our homes Across the technological frontier an incred

  • Title: Doctor Who: Blue Box
  • Author: Kate Orman
  • ISBN: 9780563538592
  • Page: 351
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Doctor Who: Blue Box”

    1. Given the lack of female writers recently on the TV version of Doctor Who, I thought it would be interesting to try out some of the female writers of Doctor Who in other mediums.And given that The Sixth Doctor’s reign was one of the most troubled eras of the show, featuring The Doctor and his young female companion in an almost abusive relationship, with that companion – if we’re honest – being little more than a leotard-clad scream-monkey there to be lusted after and pawed over by every [...]

    2. Oh, finally, an actual adult. Perhaps sensing that the Past Doctor line was suffering from an affliction that could be termed "a lack of quality", the BBC go and bring in one of their best and most reliable authors, Kate Orman. Typically, any cover sporting her name is more or less a guarantee that you're not only going to get a good novel but a well-thought out one as well, not just coasting on the good feelings we have for the show but with some of the elements that you can find in other, prop [...]

    3. Kate Orman was one of the top rank of Who novel writers during the long hiatus. Her books were experimental, original and, to be honest, better than most of the others. It's long baffled me why she didn't manage to parley her Who successes into a successful novel writing career outside Who, as fellow top-tier Who writers Paul Cornell and Ben Aaronovitch did.This was her final Who book, released after I had kind of given up on the BBC Who books, so I was pleased to run across it in a shop recentl [...]

    4. A transsexual narrator, a gratuitous slam against American law enforcement by having a highway cop come out of nowhere to try and rape Peri only to vanish in about 3-4 lines never to reappear, and a story that moves along at the1200 baud rate of the early computer. I recommend giving this angry scribbler with an agenda a pass even if you're offered this piece of crap for free. I see her projecting herself into the character of Swann. She wants things her way and will ruin the lives of anyone who [...]

    5. nwhytevejournal/1546301mlA decent enough novel taking the Sixth Doctor and Peri to the phone phreaking and computer hacking culture of mid-80s America, the story told in first person by a transsexual Australian journalist. Ages ago I read Underground: Tales of hacking, madness and obsession on the electronic frontier by Suzette Dreyfus which covers some of the same ground from an Australian perspective, which was really all I knew about it; Orman's novel seems a fair reflection of what happens w [...]

    6. It moves along at a nice clip, especially in its second half. It also wallows in some convincing early 80s techno-nostalgia for those of us old enough to remember that seemingly-distant past. However, it's certainly not the best of Kate Orman's "Doctor Who" novel canon. She doesn't have the same love & affection for the 6th Doctor & Peri that she does for the 7th & 8th Doctor; her adoration in those efforts positively glows on each and every page. In all honesty, the novel never real [...]

    7. What a wonderful surprise this book was. It's a genuine, grown-up novel in the Doctor Who universe. The portrayal of Peri's character, in particular, was extraordinarily sensitive. Best Who novel I've read, by a long way. Setting the novel back in the 1980's was an inspired choice as well. For one thing, it gives the author an opportunity for profound insights into the evolutionary arc of computer technology and the social transformations it would unleash; but it also acts as a subtle and rather [...]

    8. I'm not sure I'll finish this one - it's very slow going. I never met Peri or the Sixth Doctor before, and I still don't feel like I have. So far, he's made a few phone calls, but otherwise has only been in one scene of the book - and it wasn't with Peri. The POV is an external character who doesn't know them either, and that's hard, too. The plot is interesting - computers and technology set in the 1980s - but I think I'll have to keep this one on the backburner until I see an adventure. Unless [...]

    9. Past Doctor Adventure (PDA) with the sixth Doctor and Peri. Reads like a draft was published by mistake. A number of internal inconsistencies, narrative gaps, and a couple of badly-written chapters. If you just want to read a Doctor Who book, sure, go for it. But if you're not much into Doctor Who books, don't bother.

    10. Don't get me wrong, the book was good, but it just didn't have the 'Who' feeling, mostly probably because of the "why are you renting a camper and hiding in the forest and ignoring the fact that the TARDIS would be a much better place to hide away" moments.

    11. One of the (one star) reviews on this book opens with "A transsexual narrator, " Well then.As a 'gender bending, character assassinating' degenerate lefty, consider me sold.

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