Mosses from an Old Manse and Other Stories

Mosses from an Old Manse is Nathaniel Hawthorne s second story collection, first published in 1846 in two volumes and featuring sketches and tales written over a span of than twenty years, including such classics as Young Goodman Brown, The Birthmark, and Rappaccini s Daughter Herman Melville deemed Hawthorne the American Shakespeare, and Henry James wrote thatMosses from an Old Manse is Nathaniel Hawthorne s second story collection, first published in 1846 in two volumes and featuring sketches and tales written over a span of than twenty years, including such classics as Young Goodman Brown, The Birthmark, and Rappaccini s Daughter Herman Melville deemed Hawthorne the American Shakespeare, and Henry James wrote that his early tales possess the element of simple genius, the quality of imagination That is the real charm of Hawthorne s writing this purity and spontaneity and naturalness of fancy.
Mosses from an Old Manse and Other Stories Mosses from an Old Manse is Nathaniel Hawthorne s second story collection first published in in two volumes and featuring sketches and tales written over a span of than twenty years including s

  • Title: Mosses from an Old Manse and Other Stories
  • Author: Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 207
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • 1 thought on “Mosses from an Old Manse and Other Stories”

    1. Though Hawthorne is one of my favorite writers, and this is the first of his books that I ever read, I've never gotten around to reviewing it here until now --an inexcusable lapse that I'm finally rectifying! I've read all of it at least once, and the 1967 date is only approximate; this was a favorite reading staple of my middle and late teens, and I've read several of the pieces here more than once (some as recently as the 90s or later). Some of the stories greatly influenced my youthful imagin [...]

    2. Absolutely beautiful writing. Hawthorne's prose is untouchable. It's a joy to read even when the stories lag. Although that seldom happens. "Rappacini's Daughter" and "Feathertop" were my favorites, tragic tales of sci-fi and fantasy.

    3. Esta recopilación es muy floja. Y más si buscas lo que te indica la tapa: relatos fantásticos y siniestros. Yo pondría: relatos descriptivos y filosóficos. La vieja rectoría (3/5):No es un relato, él nos describe su residencia. Yo me lo planteo como el sitio en el que escribe por las noches estos relatos que leo, mientras se escucha el ulular de los búhos. Emplea un método embudo, en el que describe lo más grande, y un elemento de el lo describe y así hasta llegar el fin, en el que su [...]

    4. An early collection of tales. Some of the subtle, almost subliminal problems Hawthorne has with female sexuality (for instance, as metaphorically developed in Rappaccini's Daughter and The Birthmark) are interesting for the light they throw on Hawthorne's attitude toward women, and The Artist of the Beautiful marks an early example of the theme of heart over head that Hawthorne will continue throughout his writing life. As tales, these pieces often don't follow traditional dramatic arcs, which c [...]

    5. Also for my SF/F class, also stultifyingly boring. There's something a bit more alive about Hawthorne's prose than Poe's, I think, but once you've read a couple of stories, they all seem to sound the same. I got to the point where I was skimming in self-defence.

    6. Mosses from an Old Manse (1846/1854) is a collection of 26 tales and sketches by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Hawthorne's imagination, insight into human nature, elegant and clear style, quiet humor, lack of sentimentality, empathy with human sin and suffering, and range of genres are all impressive. His pieces here include overt allegories, fanciful dreams, vivid sketches, explorations of the artistic spirit, investigations of "the gloomy mysteries of the human heart," proto science fiction, psychologi [...]

    7. There's something about Nathaniel Hawthorne's writing. I listened to a librivox recording of this book years ago. It was narrated by Bob Neufeld and his voice is just perfect for these stories.Even if I didn't really understand some of these stories, Hawthorne has a style of writing that is just comforting to listen to. One story involved just a description of a fireplace. His prose is simply beautiful.

    8. According to the Introduction in this edition, Herman Melville dubbed Nathaniel Hawthorne "the American Shakespeare," and after reading this second of his collections of essays and short fiction, that seemingly startling comparison makes sense. Hawthorne's elegant -- at times approaching majestic -- writing, the breadth and depth of his literary vision, and his insights into the human condition, do feel Shakespearean.

    9. What can one say about Hawthorne? If you enjoy his work, Mosses is a must-read. I had the opportunity to visit the Old Manse just after re-reading the book, and it of course enhanced the experience.

    10. One of Hawthorne's better known collections. Note: the Kindle version is essentially only about half the stories in the volume. And, funny enough, doesn't include the Mosses From and Old Manse.

    11. One of the best short story collections I have ever read. Humor, Transcendentalism, History, Philosophy, and the supernatural all rolled into an incredibly readable ball.

    12. "Mosses from an Old Manse and other stories" is a collection of short stories published separately under the author's name. It consisted of "The Birthmark", "Young Goodman Brown", "Rappaccini's Daughter", "Mrs. Bullfrog", "The Celestial Railroad", "The Procession of Life", "Feathertop: A Moralized Legend", Egotism; or The Bosom Serpent", "Drowne's Wooden Image", "Roger Malvin's Burial" and "The Artist of the Beautiful". The collection is freely available from Gutenberg Project and other sites.De [...]

    13. The first edition was published in 1846 with 23 stories, and later expanded to 26 stories in 1854. This edition reprints 11 of them. Most of the stories are allegorical and depict some of the darker aspects of human nature. The stories don’t hold up particularly well for modern readers, being somewhat wordy and not especially sophisticated. My brief comments about each story follow.• “The Birthmark” (1843) • A scientist endeavors to remove his wife’s birthmark and discovers that Natu [...]

    14. Hawthorne rocks the world. Unfortunately he is greatly misunderstood. We read him in school, oftentimes, through the lens of The Scarlet Letter, which is usually taught all wrong. Hawthorne, like The Scarlet Letter, is usually presented by teachers as a critic of his time and culture. If that's all that Hawthorne is good for then by all means we should grow up disliking him. But I'm telling you, people, that he is good for so much more. Read my review of The House of the Seven Gables for a more [...]

    15. A collection of short stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne. My first book by this author and I will be coming back to his work! His writing is beautiful and it really draws me in. Free on the kindle.Stories read:The Old Manse - Some beautiful descriptions of nature in this one!Mrs. Bullfrog - Mr. Bullfrog finds out his wife has a secret.Fire Worship - An ode to open fireplaces and a lament about the "modern" stoves that were replacing them. I loved it!Buds and Bird Voices - An essay about spring.The C [...]

    16. I should say first that I am not a big fan of short stories. I generally find them somewhat frustrating and incomplete. However, I am finding that, particularly when trying to read authors I don't particularly like, I can appreciate them much more. Hawthorne, for instance. I tried reading The House of Seven Gables over 10 years ago, and got bored and gave up within the first 50 pages. His layers upon layers of description and background were just too much for my teenage brain to wade through. I [...]

    17. This is an anthology of short stories some of them familiar from freshman english classes. I enjoyed revisiting Young Goodman Brown, Rappuccini's Daughter, and most of all the horrifying Tale The Birthmark, where a husband dwells upon his wife's hand-shaped facial marking until she feels the force of his contempt to the point of voluntarily undergoing his experimentation. In the end she is cured of her marking, but also of drawing breath on this mortal plane. I have to say that enjoyed The New A [...]

    18. I really wanted to love this book. I toured the Old Manse in Concord, MA this past summer and began learning more about Massachusetts' transcendentalists and friends, finding their philosophies and biographies intriguing. I also was aware of Hawthorne's reputation as a literary "relative" of Edgar Allen Poe. But with the exception of his fantastic and more essay-like entries ("The Old Manse" and "Fire Worship"), few of Hawthorne's tales rise above heavy-handed allegory. The ones that do (famousl [...]

    19. Meh. I like Hawthorne on a good day, and some of his best known stories ("The Artist of the Beautiful", "The Birthmark", "Young Goodman Brown") are collected here. There were also a few new delights for me: I loved "Roger Malvin's Burial"and "The Old Manse". However, there is no mistaking that he is a clumsy allegorist at times. "Egotism; or, the Bosom Serpent", "A Select Party", and "The Christmas Banquet" are particularly painful. Also, his essay-musings contained here read as incredibly self- [...]

    20. Hawthorne, NathanielTales and SketchesIn compilation only.1) The Old Manse2) The Birth-Mark3) A Select Party4) Young Goodman Brown5) Rappaccini's Daughter6) Mrs. Bullfrog7) Fire-Worship8) Buds and Bird-Voices9) Monsieur du Miroir10) The Hall of Fantasy11) The Celestial Rail-Road12) The Procession of Life13) Feathertop14) The New Adam and Eve15) Egotism; or, The Bosom-Serpent16) The Christmas Banquet17) Drowne's Wooden Image18) The Intelligence Office19) Roger Malvin's Burial20) P.'s Corresponden [...]

    21. "Egotism; or, The Bosom-Serpent" is my favorite out of any of Hawthorne's short stories, but "The Birthmark" and "Rappaccini's Daughter" are also excellent examples of Hawthorne's mastery of symbolism and allegory. I'm a true fan of Hawthorne's style and his writing. These stories and Hawthorne in general helped to shape and cement my appreciation for great literature versus just reading for sheer pleasure. However, I have to say that more so than some other classics, Hawthorne IS a sheer pleasu [...]

    22. I must admit that I struggled with the language on a number of occasions and that did make the stories hard work. There are some good elements in each of the stories. I particularly liked the science aspect in Birthmark and Rappaccini's Daughter. They are certainly good short stories but left me wanting more depth of character or something to shock or surprise me, perhaps fuelled by modern trends in short stories and films.

    23. This is my first book by Hawthorne (better late than never, I guess) and I am surprised by how much I like his writing style and the topics of his short stories. This was a reading assignment in the one of the MOOCs that I am currently taken on Coursera (Fantasy and Science Fiction). Excellent course, by the way I will probably read some of Hawthorne's other books now, starting wit the Scarlet Letter.

    24. Trying again to read Hawthorne for the Coursera SF/F class, I got much more interested in his writing than I had long ago when I was young. I guess I’ve grown up despite my best efforts! Like many others on the class forum, I particularly enjoyed the tale “Rappaccini’s Daughter”, an interesting reversal of the Grimm Brothers’ “Rapunzel.”

    25. This is a very strange book. Puritanical mixed with fantasy mixed with a great writer who is working within the limits of his time. Hawthorne was a huge influence on Melville, which is interesting to think about, since Moby Dick is so much more modern. Interesting to watch how the generations take from each other, what they offer, what passes and what lasts.

    26. This book contains some of my favorite high school/college reads such as Mrs. Bullfrog, The Birthmark, and Young Goodman Brown. I enjoyed revisiting Hawthorne's stories and can say that I appreciate them more with age. In addition, I visited Old Manse last week and find Hawthorne's description to be perfect.

    27. Read for Coursera: Fantasy and Science Fiction: The Human Mind, Our Modern WorldMay not be exact editionRead for course:The BirthmarkRappacini's DaughterThe Artist of the BeautifulYou do need to concentrate on these because of the language but they are rewardingly creepy once you get stuck in.

    28. To me, a bit more complex than Poe, they share some themes and ways of exploring them. Even though I was reading this book for the Cousera Fantasy and Science Fiction course, I found it hard to get into it. Didn't really like Young Goodman Brown or The Birthmark, but got very interested once I read Rapaccini's Daughter. That was my mind changer and realized I was reading a great writer.

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