Some Extraordinary Popular Delusions

Describing bizarrely popular Victorian street slang, the madness of crowds, stock market mania from the South Sea Bubble to Tulip fever , popular fashions, fads, crazes, schemes and scams, this brilliantly entertaining and ever relevant study of human folly shows that we are always susceptible to hysteria and bamboozlementEAT IDEAS Throughout history, some booksDescribing bizarrely popular Victorian street slang, the madness of crowds, stock market mania from the South Sea Bubble to Tulip fever , popular fashions, fads, crazes, schemes and scams, this brilliantly entertaining and ever relevant study of human folly shows that we are always susceptible to hysteria and bamboozlementEAT IDEAS Throughout history, some books have changed the world They have transformed the way we see ourselves and each other They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted They have enriched lives and destroyed them Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.
Some Extraordinary Popular Delusions Describing bizarrely popular Victorian street slang the madness of crowds stock market mania from the South Sea Bubble to Tulip fever popular fashions fads crazes schemes and scams this brilli

  • Title: Some Extraordinary Popular Delusions
  • Author: Charles Mackay
  • ISBN: 9780141192925
  • Page: 284
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Some Extraordinary Popular Delusions”

    1. I understand completely why this text was reissued: the parallels to contemporary events (like the dot-com bubble, the housing bubble, the crash of 2007 and frenzied investment in Iraqi infrastructure and petroleum projects) are so striking as to almost seem contrived. It's like history has conspired to bear out MacKay's thesis to perfection: you could hardly hope for better validation outisde of a laboratory!The illumination cast by his thesis itself is probably worthy of a five-star rating, bu [...]

    2. Excerpted from the original: four exceedingly-readable chapters on the follies of the multitude. Including one of the best accounts there is of the idiocies of an economic bubble.

    3. It seems the lack of copyright for this publication has left readers several dozen editions, each radically different from the last. Beware the Dover edition, it is about 400 pages short of the original, and includes only three chapters, the last of which it includes only 6 pages of, ending abruptly in the middle. The chapters I did read were interesting enough, if not for Mackay's knack for storytelling then for their shocking resemblance to modern market frenzies. I will say he does at times g [...]

    4. Mackay debunks and pokes fun at pseudoscience, popular delusions, and hoaxes (here he examines economic bubbles, popular follies of great cities and murder through poisoning).Popular Follies of Great CitiesThe South-Sea Bubble The TulipomaniaThe Slow Poisoners

    5. Un libro muy jugoso para el interesado en la economía y sus historias más vergonzosas. Tiene unos toques amarillos deliciosos y está muy bien traducido. Un capricho culpable muy recomendable.

    6. This book focuses on three bubbles: the Mississippi Company bubble, the South Sea bubble, and the Dutch tulip mania bubble.It is fascinating on two levels: one, the mechanics of how a bubble is formed and expanded are interesting on their own; two, reading about them is a little bit like watching a car crash in slow motion.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *